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15 ™PAGE ISSUE! 



NOW INCORPORATING 



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THE NEW 



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ADVENTURE NOW 
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A STAR IS EOKN-. 



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WITH THIS ISSUE - COMMODORE 
• BUSINESS AND AMIGA USER- 



Good news! 



If you wont to get the most out of your Commodore 128 or 64, 
we have goods news for you. The Pocket 128 and 64 Series 
of Software both offer you serious, professional quality 

software potass that m easy to use and inewwnarc. 



How easy? 

Pocket 128 or 64 Software is so easy, you're ready to start 
using it as soon as it's loaded into memory. Even if you've 
never been in front of a computer before, you'll be up and 
running in thirty minutes. In fact, you probably won't ever need 
the reference guide . . . 'help' is available at the touch of a key. 
That's how easy. 

How seri§us? 

Pocket 128 or 64 packages have all the power you're ever 

likely to need. They have al of the features you'd expect in 

top-of-the-line software, and then some. The good news is that 

Pocket 128 or 64 Software Packages are priced way down 

there . . . where you can afford them. 

Fast, powerful, easy to learn and inexpensive. 

Say, that is good news! 

All for one and one lor all 

Pocket 128 or 64 Software Packages offer you something 
else you might not expect . . . integration. You can combine the 
output of Pocket Writer, Pocket Filer and Pocket Planner 
into one piece of work. You can create a finished document 
with graphs, then send individually addressed copies. 

lite bottom line is Solutions 

The word solutions is our middle name and bottom line. When 
you purchase Pocket 128 or 64 software, you can count on 
it to solve your problems. 



Pocket 
Planner 64 

apnaaanavT 



Pocket 
Writer 128 



Pocket 
Planner 128 

Spreadsheet 



Filer 64 

Database 




Pocket 
7riter64 

i Processor 



Pocket Writer 1 28 or 64 
Word Processing 

What you see is what you get 



lis!liliiorSI;ii!iiiii 



/hat I 



what 



wnar text will look like when you print it. What you see is ' 
you get . . . on screen and in print. There are no fancy codes to 
memorize, no broken words at the end of a line. 

Easy to learn and sophisticated. Pocket Writer 128 or 64 
offers standard word processing features plus . . . 



• on-screen formatting and 
wordwrap 

• on-screen boldface, 
underlines and italics 

• no complicated format 
commands to clutter text 

• on-screen help at all levels 



• spelling-checker lets you add 
words to your dictionary 

• 40 or 80 columns on screen 

• files compatible with 
PaperClip™ or other word 
processors 



Pocket Planner 1 28 or 64 
Computerized Spreadsheet 

Make fast work off budgeting and 
-recasting 



Pocket Planner 128 or 64 software lets you make fast work 
of all your bookkeeping chores. Cheque books, household 
accounts, business forecasting and bookkeeping are just some 
of the jobs that Pocket Planner 128 or 64 packages make 
easier. You can even create four different kinds of graphs. 

Accurate, sophisticated and easy to use. Pocket Planner 
128 or 64 offers standard spreadsheet features plus . . . 



• accuracy up to 16 digits, 
about twice as many as most 
spreadsheets for the 
Commodore 128 or 64 

• sideways printing available on 
dot matrix printers, for 
oversized spreadsheets that 
won't fit on standard paper 

• on-screen help at all levels 

• compatible with VisiCalc" 1 '' files 



• 80 column on-screen option 
for the Commodore 64 in 
addition to the standard 40 
columns 

• graphics include bar, 
stacked bar, line and pie 

graphs that can also be used 
in word processing files 

• smart evaluation of 

formulae for accurate 
complex matrices 



Pocket Filer 128 or 64 
Database Manager 

agement made easy 



With Pocket Filer 128 or 64, you can organize mailing lists, 
addresses, inventories, telephone numbers, recipes and other 
information in an easily accessible form. Use it with Pocket 
Writer 128 or 64 (or other word processors) to construct 
individually customized form letters. 

Pocket Filer 128 or 64 packages are fast, sophisticated and 
truly easy to use. In addition to standard database features 
they offer . . . 



iM PaperOip is a registered trademark 
of Batteries Included 



• use up to 255 fields per record 
(2,000 characters per record) 

• sorts by up to 9 criteria, can 
save 9 different sorts 

• print labels in multiple 
columns 

• flexible report formatting 
including headers and 
footers 



• optional password protection 
including limited access 
viewing or updating 

• on-screen help at all levels 

• print from any record to any 
record 

• arithmetic and trigonomefc 
functions in reports i 
to 16 digit accuracy 



7M Visicolc is a registered trademark of 
Software Arts 



Solutions! 




Your Commodore 128 or 64 



You want the very best software you can find for your 
Commodore 128 or 64, right? 

You want integrated software — word processing, 
database and spreadsheet applications — at a sensible 
price. But, you also want top-of-the-line features. 
Well, our Pocket 128/64 software goes one better. 



yrith Pocket 128 or 64, you'll find all the features you 
can imagine . . . and then some. And Pocket 128/64 is so 
easy to use, you won't even need the reference guide. 
On-screen and in memory instructions will have you up 
and running in less than 30 minutes, even if you've never 
used a computer before. 

Pocket Writer 128 or 64, Pocket Planner 128 or 64 and 
Pocket Filer 128 or 64 . . . Solutions at sensible prices 
from Digital Solutions Inc. 



Serious software 
that's simple to use. 



International & Distributor enquiries to: 



f /J Digital 
// Solutions 
fA Inc. 



30 Wertheim Court, Unit 2 
Richmond Hill, Ontario 
Canada L4B1B9 
Telephone: (416) 731-8775 
FAX: (416)731-8915 
Telex: 06-964501 



Pocket Writer 128 and 64 are available in French — full AZERTY keyboard support. 



152 pages of probably the best Commodore magazine in 
the Universe! 




...NEWS 



OVERVIEW 

Caged PC's . . . Transatlantic Link . . . 
Computerised radios . . . New handled 
Ariola ... 132 Matrix . . . Lewd Leather 
Godesses . . . and much, much more . . . 

6,7,8 



...REVIEWS 



PETSPEED 1 28 

The latest compiler 28 

MUSIC FAIR 

Ian Waugh computes the notes! 77 

PLUSGRAPH 

Top x4 utility 82 



...FEATURES 



The secrets behind the Mega-Empire! 

10 to 14 



US GOLD 

The secrets behin 

SHOWDOWN 

The lowdown on Olympia's showdown 

18 to 22 
Commodore goes North 24 

128 

C/PM part (I 67, 68 

COMMODORE 
CONGRESS 

International interaction 78 



...CONSTA 
FACTOR 



COMMUNICATIONS 

MICRONET 

Shades out of the dark 1 6 

SUPERFELIX 

The truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth — and if you believe that 
you'll believe anything! hehehe . . . 

30,31 



CHARTS 

What's in and out! 



45 



THE MUD PAGE 

Not one, but two new guest wizzes! 54 

MINTERMANIA 

The Grand Llama Wacks Out! 62 

BASIC 

Getting down to it for beginners part 8 

73,74 

LETTERS 

Our postbag swelling as usual! 81 



HINTS & TIPS 



Block save 64 
128 Banker 



PROGRAMS 

Printer Enhancer 64 

CLASSIFIED 

Little ads for big bargains 



86 
86,87 



88 



97,98 




COMPUTING 

INTERNATIONAL 
November 1986 



:i/rn V A f^X , 




COMMODORE 
BUSINESS & AMIGA 
USER 

All the latest on the greatest micro! 65 



MgameswQrM) 

Ultima IV . . . the crowning adventure 

60 

MEGA REVIEWS 

C64, C1 6, Amiga 

C-64: W.A.R Miami Vice . . . Robo 

Knight . . . Leaping Louie . . . Green Beret 
. . . Surf Champ . . . Best of Beyond . . . 
Iridis Alpha . . . Galaxibirds 
C-16: Monty on the Run . . . Jetbrix . . . 
Classics II . . . Jailbreak . . . Yie Ar Kung 
Fu . . . Tombs of Tarabash . . . Street 
Olympics . . . and Bev's favourite, Dirty 
Den! To top them all, it's Madness Time 
on the Amiga! Plus, Bulletin 1000 

PREVIEW TIME 

We give you the bizz on the latest mega- 
wizz games 

Jack the Awesom-Nipper, Amazing 
Uchi-Mata, Terrifying Trailblazer 84 



iKbA _,-j_'4 have room 

Even w«h152pa9eswe<l.dMha 

Sreverytmnf hi ^Sng Teld over! 

So its Desktop Pu b l'^;9 emsMusi c 
There'«be.4Memo^ ^ 

;S^2i — - 




Dear Reader, 



This month we are publishing the largest ever CCI. It 
includes a a substantial section which is devoted to 
Commodore Business and AMIGA User. This is now 
being sold as a separate publication but we thought that 
it would be of interest to all Commodore owners. 

CCI's larger size reflects the growing optimism of the 
computer industry (See the PCW Feature) and also the 
recovery that Commodore is making from its serious 
financial problems of the last 18 months. Commodore 
specific software is now the taking largest part of the UK 
and of other countries' software markets. In the UK, the 
64 and the C16 between them now sell about 45% of all 
games. 

It is something of a relief that Commodore has 
returned to profitability. It has a better future than many 
thought would be the case just a short time ago. The 
new 64C is already proving to be a success. As you can 
see from AMIGA User, there is an encouraging growth 
in the amount of products for the AMIGA to back it up 
as the most exciting machine on the market. The 
International Conference held by Commodore (reported 
in this issue) confirms the returning confidence. 

We hope you like the solider CCI and find the new — I 
hesitate to use the term "spectrum" of colours across 
the magazine name agreeable. A change now and again 
refreshes everything. 

We are also introducing other new features like 
Adventure and Simulation Sections. Increasing 
size will bring more spa e for programs too. If you 
would like to see other aspects covered in forthcoming 
CCis, I should be happy to hear from you what you 
would like included. 



/$"<? 



Antony H. Jacobson 
Publisher 



Managing Editor and Publisher 

Antony Jacobson 

Editorial Assistant 

Julian Rosen 
Features Editor .. Anthony Mael 
Editorial/Production/ 
Subscription Controller 

Sharon Gilkes 

Senior Advertisement Manager 

James Mack 

Advertisement Manager 

Max Jacobson 

Finance Director 

B.J. Lewis M.Sc. F.C.A. 
Consultant Art Editor 

Graham Baldock 

Illustration/Artwork 

M.J./M.L Arts 

Darren Chandler 

Photography 

Paget Joseph 

Contributors 

Ian Bennett 

Leslie L Bunder 

Bill Donald 

Sherri Gilkes 

Tony Lydeard 

Jeff Minter 



Rae West 

Neil Day 

E. Deghaye 

Courtney King 

Ian Waugn 

Chas Duncan 

Beverley King 

John Arthur 

Telephone 01-278 0333 

Editorial ext: 274 
Advertising ext: 280/286 
Subscriptions ext: 274 

Address: 

Finsbury Business Centre 

40 Bowling Green Lane 

London EC 1 RONE 

Distributed by: Comag, Tavistock 

Road, West Drayton, Middx UB7 

7QE 

Printed by Chase Printers Group 

Typesetting: Carlton Barclay 

Published by Croftward Limited 

Commodore Computing mtcrnabonai - an iHfepwJa m—gnfat (at 
Commodore computer users - h not connected in any way with Com- 
modore B mine* Machnes U K I td i t is published 1 2 times per year by 
Croftward Limited The pubiishm do not accept liabiSty for any 
iicorrect statement or errors contained in materia) from Mependent 
sources or author) which may be reproduced from time to time. 

© Croftward Limited 1 986 



ADVERTISERS 
DIRECTORY 



Adamsoft 92 

Addictive Games 59 

Alligata 41 

Anco Marketing 57 

Anglosoft 55 

Arcana Software 55 

Bug Byte 59 

Calco 83 

Colleen Ltd. 26 

Compumart 78 

Computer Cupboard 95 

Database Publications 33 

Datel Electronics 61 

Delta Pi 75 

Digital Solutions 3 IFC 

Dimension 9 

Dosoft 95 

Dynamite 27 

Evesham Micros 63 

FCC Systems 92 

First Analytical Ltd. 17 

First Publishing 15 

First Software 79 

Gremlin 36 
H&P Computers 20, 85 

ICPUG 85 

JCL Software 75 

Konix 47 

Meedmore Ltd. 76 

Micronet 800 23 
Precision Software 25, 27 

R.E. Limited 78 

School Software 85 

Selec 83 

Sircal Instruments 27 
Sixty Four Software Centre 39, 64 

Superior Software 43 

Supersoft OBC 

System Software 29 

Trilogic 85 

Trojan Products 83 
US Gold 12, 59 

UK Soft Centre 59 

Wigmore House 25 

Wizard Software 29 



news . . .news . . .news . . .news 




Tarzan 
Lord of the 
Martech 

Tarzan — Lord of the Jungle, 
is a new arcade combat adven- 
ture from Martech which will 
be released in November. It is 
the official licensed version of 
the game, based on the hero 
created by Edgar Rice Bur- 
roughs. 

Set in the sprawling jungles 
of Africa, the game concen- 
trates on Tarzan's quest for 
Jane, his mate, who is kid- 
napped by hostile natives. 
They have taken her to their 
village hidden in thedepths of 
the dark jungle. The jungle is 
enormous and very danger- 
ous, it is very easy to get 
hopelessly lost. Tarzan, in his 
relentless search for Jane, 
will encounter many hazards 
in the jungle which must be 
avoided or overcome. 

Some of the many different 
animals are Tarzan's friends 
— some attack on sight! The 
natives, equally hostile will do 
all they can to kill Tarzan. He 
must fight them in fierce 
hand-to-hand combat. Also 
hidden in the jungle are mys- 
terious temples and caves. 
Tarzan will need to explore 
these also — at his peril!! 

Tarzan will not rest until he 
finds and rescues Jane. He 
will fight to death with all who 
stand in his way. If you see 
him coming better step aside. 
A lot of men didn'tand a lot of 
men died. It will be £8.95 in 
November. 



Young 
Masters 



Code Masters isa new budget 
software house. It is made up 
of the individuals who were 
directly involved in sourcing 
most of Mastertronic's soft- 
ware between the Company's 
formation in April 1984 and 
the end of 1985. It aims to be 
the No. 1 software house in 
the world. 

Code Masters consists of 3 
Darlings; 18 yearold Richard 
Darling, his 20 yearold brother 
David, and their father Jim. 
Together they make a for- 
midable team as Jim was one- 
time Managing Director of A. 
I. Products, the company then 
responsible forsourcing all of 
Mastertronic's software, while 
Richard and David are award 
winning programmers whose 
games have sold in excess of 
a million copies. Their prodi- 
gious range includesThe Last 
V8, Master of Magic and the 
highly successful Games 
Creator for Mirrorsoft. 

All of Code Masters' games 
will be full priced quality but 
will sell for £1.99 and their 
first 12 products will be laun- 
ched at the end of September. 
The releases will include Red 
Max, an atmospheric arcade 
adventure in which the hero 
rides a motorbike in a sleep- 
ing city, and BMX Simulator, 
the sequel to the top selling 
BMX Races. 



PC 49? 



These days you do not need a 
policeman to protect your pro- 
perty — computerwise. PC's 
can protect themselves. In Cali- 
fornia, USA, Anchor Pad Inc. is 
offering a lockable cage that 
bolts your PC to the desk top. 
It certainly has confidence 
that your PC will not 'take a 
walk'. It is offering a 'revolu- 
tionary no theft pledge'. It 
guarantees to replace a 
machine protected by Anchor 
Pad that any nefarious charac- 
ter encou rages to 'escape' from 
the cage. 



The £30 Releases 



A suite of accounting soft- 
ware called RELACS is being 
released at £30 per module 
for single-user and £90 per 
module for multi-user ver- 
sions. The suite includes cus- 
tomer/supplier/company 
accounts, stock, sales and 
purchase order processing, 
foreign currency, sales and 
purchase analysis, diary/ 
message and telecommuni- 
cations facilities. 

RELACS is fully integrated 
and easy to use, with detailed 
help screens and full colour 
capability. It links into other 
software, such as spread- 
sheets and word processing 
packages, and offers all the 
features commonly found on 
more expensive mini compu- 
ter software. RELACS has a 
long track record, having been 
originally written and imple- 



mented on Texas and NCR 
mini computers. 

The software is written in 
RM Cobol and hence can be 
used on a vast range of com- 
putersystems underMS.DOS, 
Concurrent. DOS and UNIX. 
It is possible to move REL- 
ACS between operating sys- 
tems, so users wishing to 
upgrade can do so without 
recompilation of programs: 
information can be transfer- 
red between computer sys- 
tems by floppy disc — with- 
out re-entering data. 

Included in the package 
price are a 90-day free Help- 
line, and a 30-day free app- 
roval period. A sample 
accounts package including 
customer accounts,company 
accounts, invoicing, stock, 
and RM Cobol runtime is 
available at £90 for single- 
user and £270 for multi-user. 



Triple S 



Leading computer dealer and 
distributor Worldwide Com- 
puters, a UK wide operation 
with offices in Greater Lon- 
don, Brighton and Glasgow 
has launched a System Swap 
Service, the first of its kind. 
'Triple S' guarantees that in 
the event of breakdown a 
complete computer system, 
including printer and peri- 
pherals, will be replaced by 
exact or higher performance 
equipment while the custo- 
mer's f au Ity system is repai red 



by Worldwide Computers' 
own engineers. 

The Triple S service, which 
also guarantees replacement 
system del i very withi n 6 work- 
. ing hours in the London area 
and 24 hours anywhere on 
the UK mainland, costs £250 
for any computer system up 
to a value of £5000 including 
printer and peripherals, and 
can also be purchased to 
cover equipment not origi- 
nally supplied by Worldwide 
Computers. 



Electric Dreams 
for USA 

Electric Dreams, already well 
known in Europe, has been 
launched by Activision in the 
USA. It is planned to take to 
the US successful entertain- 
ment programs from around 
the world. The lable is the first 
of it's kind in the USA. The 
first three imported products 
scheduled for release are 
Rocky Horror Show, Spin- 
dizzy and Zoid. All three 
(from the UK) have been 



massive successes in Europe. 
They will cost $29.95 in the 
USA. 

James Levy, President and 
Chief Executive of Activision 
commented that Activision is 
the strongest software com- 
pany in internatinal markets, 
so it was natural for us to 
bring some of the great soft- 
ware we were seeing to US 
audiences. The group is now 
searching for the best offer- 
ings from Europe as well as 
Japan, Australia, Canada and 
South America. 



6 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



...news... news ...news... news 



Samleco announce 

another 132 column 

Matrix Printer 



Samleco have brought out a 
low cost dot matrix printer, 
the DX-136. 

The DX-136 is a 120 cps, 
132 column, 9 needle printer, 
designed to meet the same 
robust operating standards 
as the other printers in the 

Samleco range and sharing 
80% commonality of parts. 

It comes with a heavy duty 
push-pull tractor as standard, 
with an alternative of friction 
feed only and will provide 
draft, correspondence and 



near letter quality print asl 
standard. A full range of lanr! 
guages is built into theequip- 
ment, which also uses the 
same unique interchangeable 
interface cartridges used on 
the other printers; these ena- 
ble the device to interface 
with any computer, including 
the IBM PC. 
Contact: 

Samleco 9, Fairacres, Indus- 
trial Est. Dedworth Road, 
Windsor Berkshire, SL4 4LE 
Tel: 0753 85471 7 Telex 838791 





WtMrAWtD 7%&rvoua 
MP.'! WW jacks W- 

MflT/}f HIS Pool DU>P4. f 




First UK- USA Micro Link 



A British company has ac- 
hieved a world first by provid- 
ing a link to allow computer 
users on both sides of the 
Atlantic to chat to one another 
using their micros. 

MicroLink, the UK's fastest 
growing electronic mail ser- 
vice, is able to offer this facil- 
ity via satellite to New York. 

And the cost will be approx- 
imately half that of a conven- 
tional transatlantic telephone 
call. 



The breakthrough has come 
about as a result of a deal 
struck between MicroLink and 
Mnematics, a giant American 
database. 

With the help of its US 
partner, MicroLink has set up 
a complex electronic gate- 
way which will enable the 
exchange of messages 
between micros in the US and 
the UK. 



The new service was offi- 
cially opened when Derek 
Meakin, head of MicroLink, 
sent the first message to his 
opposite number at Mnemat- 
ics, Greg Squires. 



Correction 

Cheetah's 125 joystick was 
incorrectly labelled in last 
month's add-on guide as the 
Mach LTheMach 1 has 4 fire 
buttons, autofire and retails at 
£14.95. 



COMPUTER- STYLE RADIO 



1990 may see the transformation of the 
humble trannie. The new generation of 
"intelligent" radio will enable the listener 
to dispense with tuning since it will be 
controlled by such things as touch sen- 
sitive displays which can automatically 
interrupt music to bring drivers a traffic 
flash from a different channel or relay 
new deadlines on a 64 character visual 
display. 

The BBC, in the UK is to launch a new 
Radio Data System (RDS) in the autumn 
of 1987. The service involves adding an 
inaudible digital signal to VHF-FM 
transmissions which will issue instruc- 
tions to specially designed radio 
receivers. 

A whole host of European countries 
are also attempting to develop RDS 
operations and have agreed RDS as a 
European broadcasting union standard. 

The basic service which will begin in 
September 1987 will make it easier for 
listeners to find the station of their cho- 
ice. A short code identifies a particular 
channel and selects the strongest sig- 
nal. The basic service will also display 
the name of the station being listened to 



and broadcast an accurate clock time. 
By monitoring information on other 
channels the basic service will allow 
instant retuning to other stations. 

It is estimated that the modernised 
radio sets necessary to accommodate 
the new system will initially cost between 
ten and fifteen per cent more than cur- 
rent sets though the price will fall as 
mass production rises. Already, the 
Dutch electronics giant Philips plan to 
launch an RDS set in early 1988. 

Working RDS systems were produced 
as early as 1976 and at one stage there 
were eight competing systems in Europe. 
However, it has taken a decade to pro- 
duce a single standard that was agreea- 
ble to all, making it a multi-national 
invention. 

The capital cost of generating the 
additional digital information on the 
broadcast single is low but provision of 
more sophisticated services at a later 
stage — such as visual display news 
flashes would initially be more expen- 
sive but obviously a probable develop- 
ment. 

The RDS would use programme type 



codes which could search for 32 pre- 
determined programme types such as 
serious music and drama. Similarly, 
another code could provide the receiver 
with two separate volume controls 
allowing greater sound balance. The 
system could also provide a limited 
capacity data channel (like telex) which 
would be able to transmit a computer 
program or sports results to an external 
computer printer or visual display unit. 

Before the launching of the RDS ser- 
vice, West Germany has made a revolu- 
tionary decision to replace one of their 
four television channels on its high 
power direct broadcasting satellite with 
1 6 channels of digital stereo radio. Such 
broadcasts could be received in much of 
southern England on dish aerials only 
44 cms in diameter. 

Radio, for so many years, the poor 
little cousin of glamorous TV can come 
back into the forefront of communica- 
tions by linking up with computers and 
providing invormation of much greater 
value than largely "entertainment" 
orientated TV. 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 7 



...news... news ...news... news! 



Computer 
Erotica 

Infocom have sent us infor- 
mation about a newtitle called 
(we want you not!) Leather 
Goddesses of Phobos. They 
gave us three levels of details 
Tame, Suggestive and Lewd. 
We think you'resophisticated 
enough for the Lewd! so (we 
quote) "Grease up for a erotic 
romp through space in LEA- 
THER GODDESSES OF 
PHOBOS, Infocom's up-and- 
coming work of interactive 
fiction. Written by Steve 
Meretzky (a guy who knows 
his stuff), LEATHER GOD- 
DESSES OF PHOBOS is a 
hot intra to Infocom's new 
Comedy genre. Early in the 
story, you reveal yourself as a 
handsome stud or a sexy 
siren, and you'd betterbelieve 
it makes a difference! 

The saga begins in 1936 in 
Upper Sandusky, Ohio, where 
you're boozing it up at a 
sleazy bar. Suddenly, you're 
seized by aliens, who pin you 
down with their slimy tenta- 
cles as they carry you off to 
Phobos, a moon of Mars. You 
learn that you've been snat- 
ched by the raunchy Leather 
Goddesses of Phobos. They 
want to test you out with all 
kinds of indescribably 
degenerate equipmentin pre- 
paration for their coming in- 
vasion of Earth, which they 
plan to turn into their private 
playground. For the first time, 
you admit that there's a limit 
to sexual freedom. 

So having freed yourself 
from the restrictivegrip of the 
Goddesses, you plunge into 
the seamy side of the solar 
system with your playmate 
Trent (or Tiffany, if you're 
playing as a female fatale), 
groping your way through 
puzzle after puzzle as you 
hunt for the things you need 
to build a special Anti-Leather 
Goddesses Machine. You're 
often distracted, however, by 
the erotic adventures to be 
had on other planets, in par- 
ticular the Sultan's wife (or 
Sultaness's husband) with 
whom you have a full hour of 
wild sex. 

LEATHER GODDESSES 
has two lesser "naughtiness" 
levels, but don't get sucked 



into either of them. Go all the 
way with Lewd! 

You'll get a rise out of the 
packaging, which contains a 
3-D comic book that really 
shows off the fine points of 
the Leather Goddesses. You 
also get a sensuous scratch 
'n' sniff card (scratch it, sniff 
it) and an intimate map of the 
catacombs. 

LEATHER GODDESSES 
OF PHOBOS is geared to the 
Standard Level player. It will 
be available in September for 
£29.99 for Amiga. 



Hotline from Laskys 



A deal between high street 
retailers Laskys and the soft- 
ware group interlex will pro- 
vide Laskys microcomputer 
customers with access to a 
hotline service for problem 
solving. 

Microcomputer users who 
have in the past found the first 
few months of ownership dif- 
ficult because their computer 
literacy is poor and their 
understanding of both the 
hardware and software before 
them is limited, will now be 
able to take out a three- 
month subscription to the 



Interlex telephone advice 
service. 

Laskys see the addition of 
the hotline service as an 
important step forward in giv- 
ing their potential customers 
the confidence necessary to 
make the decision to pur- 
chase and to select the right 
product. 

The package will, for a fee 
of £39.99 (inc VAT), offer a 
six-day service (9:00am to 
9:00pm weekdays, 9:00am to 
1:00pm Saturdays) covering 
all the hardware and software 
options availablef ram Laskys 
53 shoos. 




Ariolasoft 
Labels 

No longer purely dependent 
on American C64 based pro- 
duct, Ariolasoft issignificantly 
expanding its own product 
range, including many new 
independently sourced pro- 
grams. The majority of which 
will be released simultane- 
ously across 3 or more 
machine formats. 

To market this increase in 
'Home-grown' software effec- 
tively, a new arcade/action 
label, REAKTOR, and a stra- 
tegy/adventure label 39 
STEPS have been created. 

First out on REAKTOR will 
be 'DEACTIVATORS', a game 
full of 'explosive' action and 
unusual gameplay. 

Launching the 39 STEPS 
label will 'THEY STOLE A 
MILLION' — this is your 
chance to plan the perfect 
raid. Choose the target, the 
team and use the blueprints 
to plan the job — then press a 
key and watch it all happen 
before your very eyes! 



New Guide 
to Computer Success 



A new practical guide written 
primarily for the owner or 
manager of a small business 
who is planning to buy a 
computer system for the first 
time has been published by 
Enid Mumford, Professor of 
Organisational Behaviour, 
Manchester Business School. 
The 78-page "Using Com- 
puters for Business Success" 
booklet explains how to ana- 
lyse business needs before 
choosing hardware and soft- 
ware. In simple step-by-step 
terms, it also suggests how 
companies can be reorga- 
nised so that new technology 
is introduced into a well- 
functioning business environ- 
ment and how jobs can be 
redesigned so that staff make 



Programs under licenceand 
in the Productivity range will 
continue to appear under the 
Ariolasoft label. 



the best possible use of the 
computer. 

"The objectives of making 
these changes areto improve 
business eff iciencyand effec- 
tiveness and to increase the 
job satisfaction of staff" says 
Professor Mumford, in an 
introduction to the booklet. 

The publication will also be 
useful to the manager of a 
function or department in a 
large company who recog- 
nises the value of examining 
business needs and consider- 
ing the reorganisationof work 
before introducing a new sys- 
tem. 

The booklet, which is based 
on the ETHICS method (Effec- 
tive Technical and Human 
Implementation of Com- 
puter-based Systems) deve- 
loped by Professor Mumford, 
costs £8 and is available from 
Manchester Business School, 
Booth Street West, Manches- 
ter, M15 6PB. Telephone: 061 
273 8228. 



8 Commodore Computing November 1986 



DIMENSION 

computers Ltd. 



27/29 High Street 

Leicester LE1 4FP 

Tel: (0533) 57479 




THE MIDLAND'S LARGEST HOME COMPUTER STORE 



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Tape-to-Disc and Utilities Cartridge £39.95 

FREEZE FRAME 3 £39.95 

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New Commodore 64/1 28 Modem £79.95 

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With Commodore Graphics and 8K Buffer £64.95 

Music Maker 128 Keyboard & Software £24.95 

8 Channel Synthesiser Pack 

With full-size keyboard and software £1 49.95 

Comdrum Digital Drum Synthesiser £29.95 

Quickdisc +1 541 fast load/utility cartridge £1 9.95 

10 Commodore Compatible Discs with FREE plastic disc 

holder £9.95 

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To order, either send cheque/P.O. with coupon or ring (0533) 57479/21874 with 
Access/Barclaycard number. Please allow 7 days for delivery from receipt of order or 
cheque clearance. 

Please add £1.00 towards carriage and packing on any software order. 
Hardware orders add £1.00 under £65.00 and £5.00 over £65.00. Printer orders 
add £5.00 carriage. 

Send to: Dept. No CCI11, 
Dimension Computers Ltd. 
Street, Leicester LE1 4FP. 
Item 



27/29 High ff^| pSPj 



Quantity 



Total 



Price 



Name 

Address. 



Telephone: 



QeoffRey 
Bpown 

esq 

Sovereign 

of the 

Qold 

GmpiRe 




■afc- 






He controls around 25% of all the 'home 
entertainment' software sold in the U.K. 
and a great deal in other countries. 
Through his own software company. 
ThatisU.S Gold. He also commands a 
business that distributes about one third 
of all the games software that is bought 
in the U.K. and a considerable amount 
Internationally. That is Centresoft. He 
drives a red Testarozza Ferrari with his 
initials on the numberplate. He is re- 
garded by business associates and oth- 
ers in his world with a mixture of affec- 
tion, respect and fear. 

"He's a nice guy who deserves every- 
thing he's got..." 

"He's a ruthless bastard who has 
changed the software industry — for the 
worse." 

Two comments from people in the 
software business who know him 
well ... He is Geoff Brown, Managing 
Director and virtually total owner of the 
largest empire of "Home entertainment" 
software in Europe, possibly the world. 




Jrown has in four years risen from 
teacher to entrepreneurial millionaire, 
from unsuccessful rock musician to 
entertainment mogul, from computer 
games player to computer world power. 
His mercurial rise epitomises the quick 
fortunes that can be made by quick 
minds in a brand new businesses — in 
this case, computing — in which the 
only rule is that there are no rules; where 
the strong, fast, creative individual can 
have a profound and personally reward- 
ing effect; where a man with an idea, 
with ideas, can not only change the 
industry he confronts and create a luc- 
rative future for himself but actually 
make up that industry's future as he 
goes along. 

Brown isatall slim man with a casual, 
unassuming air. He does not give the 
immediate impression of a workaholic 
dynamo. 

"What is the secret of U.S. Gold's suc- 
cess?" We asked him. 

There was not a moment's hesitation, 
and though confidently, even arrogantly 
stated, the reply was essentially modest. 

"The others were so bloody awful! 
U.S. products were simply not reaching 
the U.K. market in any quantity. The 
Americans d id n't even believe the market 
existed. It took a long time to convince 
them . . . Anybody could have done it . . ." 

But no-one did until Geoff Brown 
crossed the Atlantic and persuaded U.S. 
companies that they could not sell their 
games for £30 or £40 in the already 
beginning to boom UK and European 



markets. He convinced them that the 
best, most profitable way for them to 
exploit this "non-existent" area would 
be for them not to try to sell their expen- 
sively packaged disks themselves but to 
license their hot selling games to him. 
He would pay them a few dollars a time 
and mass market the games. Nearly all 
of them on cassette fortheodd manout 
UK computer kids-on a label he would 
specially create. 

It was a simple idea and with the mar- 
keting flair that has brought him excel- 
lent rewards he aptly called it "U.S. 
Gold". Brown certainly found a Klon- 
dyke with U.S. Gold. 

Within 18 months kids were buying 
games because they were U.S. Gold. 
Never mind what games they were, it 
was the label that guaranteed their up- 
to-the-minute, top-of-the-market, Levis, 
Big Mac, BMX, The Real Thing U.S. 
style sock-it-to-us authenticity. At the 
1985 Commodore Show, U.S. Gold 
wasn't there but on the CGI Stand we 
had some U.S. Gold posters. The kids 
nearly rippeddownthe Stand to get them. 
It was surprising not if a U.S. Gold game 
got to Number one in the Charts but if it 
didn't. 

It was a simple idea. Get hold of games 
from a whole set of different U.S. com- 
panies and market them to the kids 
under a single label. The better the 
games — and U.S. Gold did have some 
of the best companies tike Epyx to sell — 
the more it would create a snowball 
effect on other games that might come 
from a totally different surce. The idea 
was — well a U.S. Gold mine. But why 
had no-one thought of it before? 

Possibly because primarily it is not 
merely a business propistion but a con- 
cept and Geoff Brown is above all a 




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THE EMPIRE OF GOLD 

conceptual thinker. Andjike all concep- 
tual thinkers, he does not leap from his 
bath and shout 'Eureka' but develops 
ideas from existing lines of thought. 

Centresoft 

U.S. Gold is his most publically well- 
known name but it was based on Cen- 
tresoft. It was from his experience with 
Centresoft that the concept of import- 
ing, i.e own label distribution emerged. 

Centresoft is today the largest dis- 
tributor of games software in the U.K. 
and also has substantial connections in 
other countries. Distributors are, to the 
public, shadowy organizational entities. 
They buy products — frequently on sale 
or return — from the games manufactur- 
ing houses and sell them on to wholes- 
alers or direct to retail shops. A com- 
pany like Gremlin or Ariolasoft for 
example does not want to go to the 
trouble of maintaining a sales force or 
dealing direct with orders from hundreds 
of shops in the UK or even thousands in 
other countries. So it sells in bulk to 
distributors at a discount of around 50% 
of the street price. The distributors take 
around 10% and sell them on to shops. It 
is up to the distributor to push the 
games into the market. Although of 
course the individual manufacturer has 
the marketing decisions to make too, 
nevertheles, it often depends on the 
drive which a distributor puts behind a 
product how much of it actually gets 
into the shops. 

That is why in the software industry 
there is an intense suspicion of Geoff 
Brown and his Centresoft/U.S. Gold link 
up. What if, for example a U.S. Gold pro- 
duct say Leaderboard were in direct 
competition with another company's 
product, say Ariolasoft's Golf Construc- 
tion Set. Wouldn't it be to U.S. Gold's 
advantage for Centresoft to lessen the 
impact of the competitor's game? 

Brown shakes his head impatiently 
and points out that Centresoft is, has got 
to be, entirely independent of U.S. Gold. 
"It wouldn't be good, business for it to be 
anything else. It handles about 30% of 
all the games in the UK, there are a lot of 
competing products among them. U.S. 
Gold and its competitors. Centresoft" 
he states unequivocably "is entirely 
independent of U.S. Gold." 



Centresoft was started in the then mod- 
est Brown apartment near Birmingham, 
ith boxes of Atari joysticks cluttering up 
the living room. It was begun with just a 
few hundred pounds and the conviction 
that, once again, somebody was doing 
something that he, Brown, could do 
better. 

Brown acknowledges the debt he 
owes to the sharp business brain of his 
wife Anne. She still handles the legal 



and licensing negotiations. She created, 
to a considerable degree, the business 
environment in which he could exercise 
his ideas. 

He had liked to play computer games 
and realised that the way they reached 
shops was amateurish and disorganized 
compared with say the record business. 
So he set out to create an organization 
that would be professional and eficient, 
that would provide a service that the 
market could reply upon. "We have a 
highly expert team now. . . a twenty-four 
hour a day service. The best there is." 



There is no doubt that you can hype a 
game into the charts. But you can't keep 
it there if it is not good enough, "We 
have had five number ones this year you 
can't buy that," counters Brown. "We 
have good products. We take a lot of 
trouble marketing them correctly. That's 
where our strength is." 

He is scornful of the charge that cer- 
tain magazines that receive massive 
advertisng from U.S. Gold and Ocean 
labels are influenced by it into favourit- 
ism,. '"They give us fair reviews. Some 
good, some bad. Some times they tear 




Personal Power 

Suspicion of Brown in the industry is 
heightened by the fact that his influence 
stretches further even than the powerful 
U.S. Gold/Centresoft sphere. He is 
closely connected with the other soft- 
ware giant Ocean. David Ward, Ocean's 
MD is a director of U.S. Gold and Brown 
is also a director of Gremlin, a fast grow- 
ing games company that is now number 
five or six in the U.K. 

So around six or seven out of every 
ten games bought in the UK and many 
more across the world stem directly 
from the Brown Empire — and he is able 
to influence the sale of a great deal 
more. That strength, that immense per- 
sonal power is what othe games houses 
suspect and fear. It is making some new 
and old games manufacturers take up 
marketing arrangements so that their 
games can be sold through U.S. Gold. 

However others say that when the 
name on the box, the big marketing 
budget, the power to influence the 
media, the hype that almost irrespective 
of the quality of a game can jump it into 
the top 10 in the charts then there is 
justifciation for worry over there being 
such immense power in the hands of 
one individual. 



our games to pieces ... No we don't pay 
them more than anyone ele. Of course 
we do deals on price. If we gave your 
magazine 48 pages a month, you'd give 
us discounts too. But we get no special 
treatment." 

The apparent injustice of the charges 
has animated him, aroused him from is 
relaxed, laid back manner. He is an 
unlikely businessman. Tall, almost lan- 
guid, dressed casually in green. He is 
one of the new breed of entrepreneurs 
who ave made the rare jump from 
gamesplayer, performer intellectual to 
businessmen, decisionmaker, influence 
wielder, from thinker to man of action. 

He has two university qualifications a 
BSc in Maths and a degree in Education. 
He was a teacher and a musician in a 
small-time local group. As he gets from 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 1 3 




THE EMPIRE OF GOLD 

the table to sketch his company's organ- 
izational structure on a flip chart, he 
might be back in the classroom. 

He is a man of ideas, ex pressed easily 
and fluently. He has clearly thought 
carefully about the implications of his 
business. He is neither shy nor arrogant. 
His expression is difficult to read. He 
would probably be a good poker player 
or difficult to outmanoeuvre in a busi- 
ness deal once he knew what he wanted. 
He is relaxed and confident. 

"There was a lack of professionalism 
in the industry . . . We did the right 
things at the right time... Americans are 
tough to deal with . . . until they trust 
you... No I don't see the dedicated 
games machine taking off. The home 
computer is already virtually a games 
machine ... we are already beginning to 
make games for the 68000 chip machi- 
nes . . . when the Amiga takes off we 
could get into that too . . . but the devel- 
opment cost of the 68000 games is very 
high, too high... We see opportunities 
at the lower end of the business market, 
especially in the PC area... The soft- 
ware business is moving like the music 
business. First the full price releases, 
then the compilations, then the low 
price labels. We're moving that way too. 
WHF 8 



"That's a long time to predict. Too long. 
In this business changes can come very 
quickly.Compare the situation twoyears 
ago with now. It's totally different." 

The computer world, the games world 
is certainly still changing fast. The con- 
ditions that Brown with Centresoft and 
U.S. Gold so successfully exploited are 
not going to stay the same. In fact they 
are not the same even now. 

Changes 

We spoke to U.S. companies con- 
nected with U.S. Gold and other labels 
this side of the Atlantic. There is a clear 
realization that they are not getting all 
they could out of these markets. Some 
are beginning to look seriously at set- 
ting up their own organizations for 
European and other non-U.S. markets. 
One told us "Geoff's a great guy but why 
do we have to make it all for him? We get 
a couple of dolars a throw, that's all. We 
can make a lot more than that if we do it 
ourselves." 

It may not be as easy as they think for 
the Brown Empire is a very effective 
machine. It is costly to achieve such 
efficiency. However even distribution 
channels will change as cable and 
videotex style networks allow down- 
loading of software and as other tech- 
nologies crossover into computers. 




That's why we created the Americana 
label. We had a lot of games that weren't 
right for full price... you can't release 
everything at that level. They're good 
games. They've gone very well, . . . Now 
we're doing arcade conversions oursel- 
ves... Gremlin is working on Gauntlet 
for us... and we've got others coming 
from the Arcades too. With games like 
Gauntlet and Masters of the Universe, 
we'll being looking for more number 
ones in the next few months . . ." 

The market is changing. U.S. Gold is 
moving away from only imports. It is 
recognising the need to create its own 
games. 

Where will U.S. Gold . . . Centresoft be 
18 months, 2 years from now? 



What does the thoughtful Geoff Brown 
think he will do in the face of such 
changes? 

He smiles. "Get back into the music; 
perhaps... I'm involved already in re- 
cording a band." 

No, he's not in the band himself. It is 
not a question of age, he is still into 
playing computer games. It is clearly 
important to him to keep in touch with 
younger generations. Now into his late 
thirties, he has no children of his own. "I 
like young people ... I get on well with 
them ..." Outside the large modern 
building on an upmarket industrial 
estate outside Birmingham to which the 
organization recently moved, we see 
him with his attrative dark haired wife 



climb into the shiny red Ferrari. Is the 
£60.000Testarozza a toy forgamesplayer 
Geoff or a status symbol for the Manag- 
ing Director Brown of the Gold Empire? 
Is he merely a fortunate ex-maths 
teacher who was in the right place at the 
right time or a shrewd tough-minded 
businessman who had the sharpness of 
intelligence to see that someone, he, 
could seize a young, disorderly industry 
and shake into profitable shape? Is he 
now concentrating on gathering a highly 
professional team around him to consol- 
idate his hold over it or looking back 
over his shoulder to his past rocking 
days and gigs? Is he really nice guy or 
ruthless opportunist? No-one whom we 
asked was able to answer those ques- 
tions with any certainty. For everyone, 
even for those who favour him least, 
Brown is something of an admitted 
enigma. 

King of the Castle 

At the PCW Show, amid the deafening 
hubbub, the teeming crowds, the frenzy 
of showtime activity, there seemed just 
one place where peace and quiet reigned. 
It was the upper floor of the grandiose 
U.S. Gold/Centresoft Stand. We looked 
down from the gallery and saw there all 
alone, at the top of the castle-like edi- 
fice, contemplative, at a table was the 
Lord of the U.S. Gold empire. He sat 
unmoving, apparently, enigmatically, 
lost in thought. Was the ex-teacher solv- 
ing a maths problem? Was the musician 
considering a remix? Was the games- 
player remembering a number one in 
the charts? Was the wealthy entrepre- 
neur considering the purchase of a solid 
gold Rolls Royce? 

Geoff Brown's thought processes are 
of interest because he affects us. He 
influencesourchoices, enhances or res- 
tricts important areas of our leisure. He 
plays a role in our lives, Whether his 
influence will increase or diminish, it is 
impossible to say. What is certain is that 
nothing that Geoff Brown does will be 
done without the use of creative intelli- 
gence and imagination. Those are excit- 
ing qualities in a man who has the power 
to put them into action. The already 
impressive progress of the ruler of the 
U.S. Gold Empire will continue to be 
well worth watching. 



14 Commodore Computing November 1986 





With the growing popularity of Commodore 
Computing International Magazine, newsagents and 
bookstalls sell out quickly. More and more frustrated 
readers wanting the one magazine every Commodore owner needs 
are finding they are missing out and some months having to do 
without the latest news, reviews and vital feature articles and 
programs. 

The popular solution is to place an order for your Commodore 
Computing International Magazine with your newsagent or by direct 
subscription to us. 

A subscription means you get the magazine delivered to your 
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Micronet's 
Multi-user Game 



Despite their claim to have a multi-user 
game, Starnet, running, Micronet have, 
until now, lacked any real competitor to 
Multi-User Dungeon, affectionately 
known as MUD to its avid followers and 
players. Indeed, anyone who reads our 
magazine regularly will know all about 
MUD by now, as we have been carrying 
articles about multi-user games 
(MUG's), MUD in particular, for quite a 
while now. 

Enter SHADES. Written by Neil New- 
ell, originally as a hobby because he 
enjoyed playing the original MUD so 
much on Essex University, SHADES has 
recently been launched on Micronet, 
the computer network, which has a 
large Commodore user-base. 

Shades began because over Christ- 
mas'85, Essex MUD was out of action 
and to satisfy his own curiosity, and 
because of his addiction to MUD, Neil 
sat down and started the project. 

At this stage the game was only a few 
subroutines slung together, but a friend 
convinced Neil to hook it up to a modem 
and miracle of miracles, it worked! 

The original game had only 20 rooms 
and 5 objects. He put the dial-up 
number on a few bulletin boards, and 
received a good response. At this time 
Shades was being run from home on 
Neil's own computer. Demand for the 
game grew, and a few more lines were 
added, including at one stage his own 
voice line which was rather annoying if 
you happened to want to speak to him! 

Micronet had for some time been 
looking for a MUG to run, and had con- 
sidered quite a few, MUD2 included 
(which I am told was turned down 
because BT wanted to charge too much 
for it). Shades was chosen because of its 
popularity, and because Neil himself 
took the time and bother to demonstrate 
Shades and its potential properly to 
Micronet. Negotiations began in May, 
when Neil first contacted Mike Brown, 
Mnet's Technical Manager because he 
thought, rightly, that Shades had com- 
mercial potential. 

The game went into operation very 
recently and was in fact only a few days 
late (unlike some . . . ). Presently it costs 
only 30p/hour, but this ridiculously low 
charge will not last long, and after the 
trial and test period is over this is to rise 



to 99p/hr; still incredibly cheap for what 
it is. 

Shades is based in principal around 
MUD, although it differs in theme quite 
considerably. Neil admits he was heav- 
ily influenced by MUD. "MUD," he says, 
"is still the best!" A large section of it is 
the standard Middle Earth scenario, but 
many sub-scenarios exist such as the 
Ruined City which has a robot wander- 
ing aimlessly about and the mansion, 
which is based around the legendary 
publishing magnate of Citizen Kane 
fame, William Hearst's own mansion! 

Currently Shades has around 500 
rooms, but more are due to be added as 
soon as they have been written. Four 
games can run concurrently, each hold- 
ing 16 players, though both of these fig- 
ures can be increased, should demand 
remain at its present level. A few days 
after the launch, all 64 lines were 
jammed solidly for hours, with free lines 
being seized the moment they were 
vacated by people quitting (or dying . . .?) 
In fact, some people seem to like the 
game so much that they are even play- 
ing at times when Prestel charges con- 
nect time making it very expensive 
indeed to play. 

Asked about Lap of the Gods (better 
known simply as GODS), Neil says 
"Clever, and interesting, but personally 
— and people's tastes vary widely — I 



never really got into it. Of course this is 
probably mainly because I haven't had 
the time to play Gods what with pro- 
gramming Shades so don't take my 
word as gospel!" I must say that I myself 
liked Gods tremendously, as anyone 
who read my review of it a few months 
back will know. 

At present there are no wizards in the 
game (apart from Neil himself of course 
who plays as an archwizard, naturally!) 
as it has only been running for such a 
short time. The original version of 
Shades is still being run from Neil's own 
computer (a PDP II) but has very few 
lines. 

If you want to play Shades on Mic- 
ronet, then go to page 81188114 for 
instruction on how to play. If you have 
ever played MUD before then you won't 
really need to read these, because 
commands are so similar, and the idea 
the same. To get points, you drop trea- 
sure in Shade's equivalent of the Swamp, 
the King's treasure room. Once you 
have read the instructions go to page 
8117 where you will be able to set up 
your persona and enter the game. 
Shades is available 6pm to 8am week- 
days, and 1 pm from Saturday afternoon 
to 8am Monday morning continuously 
(many sleepless nights here I think!) 
Good luck on your quest, and don't 
forget where you read about it! 

While I have not played it at length, 
what experience I have had-so far makes 
me believe that it is of excellent quality 
and well worth playing. 



Vou 



B *** ^ enter 




Advent J, 



9am e 



ir© 




16 Commodore Computing November 1986 



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ifeatuie, 



Has the Leopard 
reall y changed 



Outside Olympia, there was a deserted 
bus shelter with an advertisement that 
read "Has the leopard really changed its 
spots?" Inside the National Hall, there 
was a noisy, packed, frenetic world that 
bubbled with optimism and confidence 
From last year's depressed and down- 
beat so-called "Main Event" — CCI was 
virtually alone in pointing out fftenhow 
really down-in-the-mouth the home 
computer industry actually was —this 
year's PCW Show had revived to a 
totally different atmosphere. It certainly 
seemed that the neurotic computer leo- 
pard had changed its spots. 

"Terrific!" . . . The best ever!" enthused 
Paula Byrne. She should know for 
though now Marketing Manager at 
Rainbird, BT's growing quality label, 
she started the year at old favou rite Mel- 
bourne House. Preparations for two 
stands at a show like PCW are enough to 
exhaust anyone but the dynamic Paula 
was still bouncing even on the last day. 
"It's gone amazingly well . . . our stand 
has been packed the whole time. . ." 

Rainbird was far from the only soft- 
ware house to enjoy the changed 
atmosphere. All the big companieswere 
overwhelmed by the crowds and en- 
couraged by the business. U.S. Gold's 
glittery casle was always besieged by 
avid fans who may have been impressed 
by the videos — createdby Bulletin 1000 
— but a little disappointed by the lack of 
games to get their hands on. Ian Ste- 
wart's fast rising Gremlin attracted loads 
of admirers for Jack the Nipper and 
Trailblazer, their new releases. David 
Ward at Ocean's Rambo bedecked 
stand two story construction appeared 
to need protection by a burly gentleman 
who looked suspiciously like a Man- 
chester United Minder. 

The biggest and permanent crowds 
however were those that climbed all 
over a real arcade machine that Elite had 
brought. Space Harrier is soon-to-be 
released from the successful Steve Wil- 
cox stable,while Alan Sugar's Amstrad 
PC's were successful in grabbing, the 
early headlines, the interest at the Show 
itself must have disappointed him. The 
less than attractive, heavy-rimmed mon- 
itors drew a sprinkling of curiosity seek- 
ers but a PC is a PC is a PC, even if it is 
cheap and the general public soon 
melted away. 



its 
spots? 



A slightly surprising success was the 
rejuvenated Mirrorsoft whose substan- 
tial stand drew a constant audience for 
their PC Fleet Street Editor. Pat Bitton, 
Mirrorsoft's Marketing Manager, took 
equal first place for CCI's Sharpest Suit 
Prize. She wore an elegantly cut three- 
piece trousered number. 



THE 

BIGGEST 

-EVER 

PCW 

SHOW 




3-7 SEPTEMBER 1986 
OLYMPIA LONDON 

Sponsored by Personal Computer World 



The other prize winner in the same 
category was MikeMeek of Mikrogen — 
very smart flecked grey with white 
shoes. It almost outdid Mikrogen's im- 
pressive Nick "Stainless" Steel who 



paraded the Show equipped with metal 
arm and an interestingly red-foil haired 
girl companion. She is shortly to have a 
character of her own in a computer 
game, Mikrogen tell us. If you total up 
the space occupied by the fourBT com- 
panies, Rainbird, Firebird, Beyond and 
Odin, they probably occupied more 
startspace than any other company 
organization. 

Beyond built theirs as a somewhat 
cardboardy Starship Enterprise control 
cabin. We wouldn't have trusted it to 
take us boldly where etc, especially as it 
seemed mostly crewed by a lone khaki- 
shorted blonde who was pouting with 
boredom and filing her nails every time 
we passed. 

Firebird and Odin, now led by the 
non-stop enthusiasm of Tom Watson 
seemed at one time likely to be sub- 
merged by the torrent of kids demand- 
ing news of Firebird's increasingly suc- 
cesful Silver and Gold ranges and to be 
allowed to put there money down for 
Firebird Tee shirts. 

There were pressmen from all over 
the world — they kept coming up and 
interviewing CCI for opinions on the 
Show — and many trade visitors from 
outside the U.K. Dick Ollins of Trimicro 
from the U.S. pointed out that there are 
no more shows like this one in the 
States. "People don't bother any more" 
he said. "Here it's very encouraging." 

The export coup of the Show seemed 
to be the deal brought off by Jane Cava- 
nagh, Export Manager of Telecomsoft 
— BT's joint software marketing arm. 
Jane hammered out, on behalf of Fire- 
bird and Odin a deal worth over£1 mil- 
lion in games to be sold to Germany for 
the rest of 1 986. Big though it was, how- 
ever, the deal was outdone by the $3 
million contract with U.S. games house 
Epyx by joystick manufacturer Konix. 
Epyx is to sell 500,000 Konix joysticks 
under the Epyx label in the States. 

That level of commercial activity may 
not have been typical but there was an 
enormous amount of trade activity bus- 
iness completed at the Show. 

While over the nine years of its life, the 
PCW Show has progressively become 
more home orientated, it was very plea- 
sant to see that thestand that constantly 
drew the largest crowds in the "Busi- 
ness" section of the Show was Commo- 
dore. It was always jammed with eager 



Commodore Computing November 1986 21 



ifeatuie. 



Has the Leopard really changed Its spots? 

AMIGA viewers. The demonstrations as 



AMIGA viewers. The demonstrations as 
they have at every show at which the 
AMIGA has appeared were very popular. 
On the Commodore Stand, the Luton- 
based Bugbyte dealership was repre- 
sented by the lovely Linda Craig. Not 
surprisingly extraordinary numbers of 
men seemed to find Ms Craig's able 
demonstrations magnetic. They even 
stayed on to ask endless questions of 
the demonstrator. Surprise, surprise 
Chris Kaday, Commodore UK's recently 
promoted MD was even more ebullient 
than usual. He gave the impression that 
he is a man who believes he has come 
through the worst and better days are 
ahead, he was particularly eagerthat we 
should see the Misubishi colour printer 
forthe AMIGA. Itwas indeed an impres- 
sive combination and may prove an 
interesting bundle with the AMIGA for 
around £5000. Also on show were the 
long awaited RubyComm forthe AMIGA, 
Y2's interesting videotex package and 
an exciting musicproduct from Mimetics. 

CCI's 64s 

While Commodore drew the crowds for 
the AMIGA, CCIgave the public thefirst 
chance to get their hands on the sleek 
new 64C. They came in their waves and 
at times we had to form queues, espe- 
cially as CCI's stand also had some as- 
yet-unreleased games like Gremlins 
Trailblazer. Also on the stand was the 
marvellous GEOS and the excellent 
Mouse and Cheese package from Wig- 
more. The mouse is to be bundled in 
Commodore's Christmas 64C packCCI 
had the ever popular Bulletin 1000draw- 
ing big crowds as usual. 

One ot the less feasant facts was that 
CCI was given evidence of "back-up" 
packages on sale on the Show being 
used to rip off unreleased games demon- 
strated there. Piracy is illegal and CCI 
was told that at least one stand-holder 
narrowly escaped prosecution by re- 
turning a pirated disk to its legitimate 
and irate owners. 

Enormous 'effort and expense had 
gone into the construction of many 
stands. Activision's contained banks of 
blaring videos and its subsidiary com- 
pany, Electric Dreams took the CCI 
prize for the most original stand. "I 
wanted a pyramid" Dream's Marketing 
Manager Clare Hirsh told us. Like 
Tutankamun, she got one and impres- 
sive it was, too. 

Ariolsoft's stand was less elaborate 
but their not very agreeable looking 
caricature tee shirts were much in evi- 
dence. Even some of the less dominant 
software houses had gone to great 
lengths to present themselves well. 
Bubble Bus had their well-loved bus in 
their normal prominent position. Ann 
Lovejoy had however to drive a car not a 



bus half way across the country every 
day to bring in more stock. Domark 
whose top people were neatly bowtied 
had a trivial pursuit design look about 
their stand. Alligata found that their new 
PUB Games was a great draw. Cascade 
with what must be the surprise hit of the 
year ACE, looked very well received. 
Long established Addictive Games and 
the new Piranha both seemed to do ex- 
tremely well and the Minter Llamasoft 
was as always a centre for admirers. 
Hewson forgot the English summer and 
used Christmas decor on their stand. 

So apart from the flood of new games 
(see box) what was new at the Show? 
Not a great deal. There was a new joys- 
tick from Cheetah and another one from 
Mastertronic. Precision sold our con- 
tributor Bill Donald's AMIGA book like 
wildfire. Or rather Bill Donald sold it 
himself as he was at Precision's Stand. 
Haba had an interesting CAD package 
for the AMIGA. Atari had a huge area 
and very little new on it. Micronet made 
a considerable impact, at least there 
were constant crowds at Lynne Ben- 
nett's elbow to see that the free modem 
offer. And on the stand of burgeoning 
publisher First Publishing (or First 
Software, if you prefer) the energetic 
Marketing Manager Kate McGibbon 
showed some interesting new AMIGA 
and other booksand a nicely turned out 
FIRST Magazine. 

Maturing 

"The industry is maturing" we were told. 
"The vertically rising changes in devel- 
opment of new products no longer app- 
lies." What that means is that it does not 
seem necessary to introduce revolu- 
tionary new products every five minutes 
and that companies are beginning to be 
professionally run and market driven, 
instead of thrown together by technical 
wizzes who cannot read a balance 
sheet. 

There is certainly a slowing down of 
technical change and the computer 
industry seems tobe saying "Sorry folks 
this may seem lessexciting to you but its 
a damn sight more comforting to our 
bank managers." Many, even most, of 
the companies at the Show evidenced a 
growing professionalism in marketing 
and presentation, a maturing of busi- 
ness expertise. "This time last year we 
were wondering who would go bust 
next" the boss of one games company 
told us. "Now there are about 12 com- 
panies left. All of them much better off. 
Though, "he went on thoughtfully," 
there may be only 10 this time next 
year." 

Has the home computer leopard 
really changed itsit, spots? Is the up and 
down, boom and bust, announce your 



product before you've got it, techno- 
novelty driven homecomputer world 
become a stronger, maturer animal? It 
would be brave to claim it completely 
changed its spots, completely became a 
reformed character. 

However there was at this PCW Show 
anoticablydifferentatmosphereasense 
that, as CCI was told "The shake-out was 
tough but it did us good". There was a 
greater belief in itself, a belief that for a 
great many people and a great many 
companies the once flaky home compu- 
ter industry could more than live just for 
today, that it was more than just a fig- 
ment of Sir Clive's imagination, that it is 
a real live business that can go on and 
stronger, for a very long time yet. 



PCW 

Games 



It was Gamesworld at the PCW this year 
with loads of new games being announ- 
ced or previewed. At the Show arcade 
conversions seemed to be the flavour of 
the month. Elite are converting the 
arcade-hit, Space Harrier due for release 
in December, and are also converting 
Paperboy which has enjoyed huge suc- 
cess. Now Paperboy I can see being 
converted into a good game, but how on 
earth they plan to convert Space Har- 
rier, a 68000 based machine with X- 
number of co-processors I just don't 
know. The result should be interesting 
to say the least! Both will retail in the 
U.K. at 9.95 cassette, 14.95 disk. 

US Gold are releasing another popu- 
lar arcade hit, Gauntlet (the two-player 
version) later this year (which probably 
means next year knowing programers' 
notions on what the word 'deadline' 
implies). US Gold's releases are covered 
in-depth in the US Gold interview also 
carried in this issue. 

Firebird released Warhawk at 1.99 at 
the show, of which they claim to have 
sold an incredible 400 copies in two 
days. Warhawk is a classic space shoot 
'em up with nice sound, music, and gra- 
phics. Harvey Head Banger, a conversa- 
tion from the Amstraddle was also 
announced and will be released later in 
September. 

Rebel Star sees a slight departure 
from Firebird's normal line of games, 
and is a simple war game. All three of 
these games are in the Silver Range 
which retails at 1.99 each. Contrasting 
with this is Cholo, a 3D vector-graphic 



22 Commodore Computing November 1 986 






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Commodore Computing Nov 1 



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ifeatuie, 



type which will retail at 17.95 on disk. It 
does however look good, so expect a 
review very soon. Pandora is also fairly 
original, and should do well as long as it 
is well programmed. Sentinel looks like 
a real stunner with 10,000 different 
landscapes drawn in 3D "vanishing 
point perspective" graphics. On the 
C16 side their latest release is Torpedo 
Alley based on the ancient Sea Wolf 
arcade-game 

CDS were announcing the launch of 
Collos us 4 Bridge which they say plays 
as good a game of Bridge as Collos us 4 
Chess does at Chess. We'll sit our editor 
down to play this, as he claims he's an 
avid Bridge player. Let's see how far he 
gets with this program . . . 

Domark launched Trivial Pursuit, an 
excellent conversion of the board game 
of the same name. This is the 'official' 
version of the game, and looks to be well 
written, and humorous which, after all, 
is what Trivial Pursuit is all about; mind- 
less satisfaction at solving absolutely 
trivial questions! Read the review. Loth- 
lorien launched Legions of Death, a war 
game, which seems to be what Lothlo- 
rien are best at producing. Bug-Byte 
announced Miami Dice, and Jeep 
Command. 



Beyond had a huge stand designed to 
be the Starship Enterprise, showing 
Startrek videos, and demos of the new 
game which also looks very good. 

Gremlin were showing Trailblazer on 
CCI's stand, which features some nice 
scrolling and animation. You control a 
ball which speeds along a chequered 
road, avoiding and jumping over obsta- 
cles in your path in a race to beat the 
robot controlled ball, or another player. 
The display is split-screen. See the pre- 
view in this issue. 

Mirrorsoft are working on Raid 2000 
for November, and Terror of the Deep 
for December. They are also working on 
an Amiga game for release in January 
called The Bermuda Project, written by 
Eugene Evans of ex-Imagine fame. 

Melbourne House have a long list of 
releases lined up. Asterix and the Magic 
Cauldron is based around the Asterix 
book by the same name, and will retail 
for 9.95. You play as Asterix, and have to 
collect 7 pieces of the magic cauldron 
that is used to brew the potion that gives 
the Gauls their strength. Obelix follows 
you around, but has to be kept fed or 
else he will wander off, and as you need 
him to finish the game this could be a 
little bit of a hinderance! Romans, wild 



boars and the like stand in the path of 
your quest. Watch out for the review! 

Inspector Gadget, based on the car- 
toon character of the same name, was 
written by new talent discovered by 
Rachel Davis on her Compunet Quests. 
Other software houses take note — 
there is a tremendous amount of talent 
floating about onCompunet just waiting 
for you to go along and sign them up! 
Melbourne have done this with some 
success . . . Judge Dredd is also coming, 
as is of course Fist II, followed by 
Bazooka Bill which is the result of a tie- 
up with an Australian company, Arcade. 

Activision had Hacker II and Ariola- 
soft did nor have the 64 Marble Madness. 

Martech were definitely launching U- 
Chi Mata and Tarzan. Nobody could 
dispute this with the Jane lookalikes 
walking about in imitation leopard-skin 
caveman-cover 'alls'. 

Addictive Games, who are finally 
releasing games to live up to their name 
such as Arac and the Arachnidroid (see 
last month's CCI) launched Head Coach 
(to be reviewed), and Mikro-Gen laun- 
ched Stainless Steel (ditto). 

Well that just about rounds up the hot 
releases for this year's PCW Show. Until 
next year, Nanu Nanu! 



THEO 



• lit 



£ SHOW 



Why should London get all the fun? 
Intercity trains may get you there from 
anywhere but there are lots of people 
with Commodores north of a line from 
Bristol to the Wash, so why shouldn't 
they have a show on their doorsteps 
instead of always giving it to the 
Southerners? 

Database, the most recent Commo- 
dore Show organisers answered these 
questions with a single word — Man- 
chester. Of course, it could not have 
anything to do with the fact that they 
themselves are based in Stockport justa 
few miles away... 

Anyway, at UMIST —University of 
Manchester Institute of Science and 
Technology — a very suitable place, if 
you think about it — on September12th 
to 14th, the 8th Official Commodore 
Show took place. 

Inevitably, it was somewhat oversha- 
dowed by the Personal Computer World 
Show just the previous weekend. A 
number of the exhibitors, especially the 
major games houses, who would doubt- 
less otherwise have come were just 
unable to field the resources so quickly 
after the big Olympia show. Neverthe- 
less, more than 30 companies took part, 
including Commodore themselves who 
had a mini-village for the increasingly 
popular Amiga and to launch officially 
for themselves the new 64C. Chris 
Kaday, Commodore's newly appointed 
Managing Director, was able to exercise 



his frustrated talents as a showman in 
the special Commodore Theatre 

Communications was one of the focal 
points of the Showand indeed is becom- 
ing a major factor in the minds of Com- 
modore owners everywhere. Microlink, 
Modem House and the independent 
Compunet Club were there and another 
very popular stand was Micronet 800 
whose offer of a free modem seems to 
be making a major impact whereverthe 
ubiquitious Lyn Bennett takes the Swish 
new Micronet stand. 

The Show might have been subtitled 
"Commodore Market". Anyone in search 
of bargains had come to the right place. 
There was a wide range of products 
from games to peripherals, at heavily 
marked down places. From well-known 
suppliers like Evesham, Meedmore.Tri- 
logic, Adamsoft, Micro Media and Home 
and Business. System Software had 
their Petspeed and Oxford Pascal to 
show and Colleen impressed with their 
music package.Sophus.madesomething 
of a sensation recently with their trans- 
puter mounted in an Amiga. 

Manchester's Piccadilly Radio re- 
ported the Show live from a specially 
built studio and brought to the public 
not only such computer world notables 
as CCI's own controversial columnist 
Llamasoft chief Jeff Minter but also 
local celebrities like (we kid you not!) 



Sexy Bexy, a Manchester-based pop 
singer. 

CCI's own stand — one of the largest 
— had its usual crowds Getting the Best 
tee shirts and sweatshirts which seemed 
to have taken off as a must fashion item 
in the normally shirtsleeved North. An 
amazing number of new Commodore 
owners appeared also to be discovering 
CCI for the first time — we obviously 
have been too publicity shy ourselves in 
the past — and bought back numbers of 
the magazine. CCI also provided the 
games — many of them not yet on the 
streets — for the games arcade where, 
as on CCI's stand, the kids were able to 
get their hands on the new 64Cs. 

Plenty of the stands did excellent bus- 
iness but there wasamong others a feel- 
ing that coming so close after the PCW 
Show, the Commodore Show was at a 
distinct disadvantage. 

Nevertheless, thousands of those who 
came went away happy in the knowl- 
edge that they had got some cheap and 
good value early Christmas presents for 
others or even for themselves. One 
cheerful visitor staggered off with not 
one but two monitors. "Half the price I'd 
pay at Christmas in the shops!" he said 
grinning. "We need a Commodore Show 
every week!" That might be just a bit too 
often for some of us . . . 



24 Commodore Computing November 1986 



MS2000/NEOS MOUSE 



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ARTIST 64 Mouse or Joystick 



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•GIVE YOUR 64/128 — AMIGA TYPE GRAPHICS* 
Full colour working. Full screen working. Zoom and Pan. 
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Commodore and Epson printdumps. Add other print 
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— (Colours weave over and under each other) "Colour 
Cycling" "Duplicate objects without certain colours." See 
C.C.I. Review Oct. 86. 

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Pets peed 128/64 



The latest addition to the PET- 
SPEED family being for the C128, 
this review looks at both the C128 ver- 
sion and that forthe C64. Those readers 
who are not familiar with PETSPEED 
are missing part of the history of Com- 
modore computers 

So what is PETSPEED? It is a 
compiler for the various dialects of 
Commodore BASIC although it can 
compile extensions to BASIC such as 
SIMON'S BASIC, etc. In this issue of 
CCI, there is a review of Oxford PAS- 
CAL and a brief discussion is made of 
just what a compiler does. Since this 
review deals with a true compiler I'll be 
looking at this question rather more 
deeply and seeing how this product 
measures up. 

Consider the following BASIC pro- 
gram fragment: 

10 D = 4 

20 E = 6 

30 D = D + E-8 

40 PRINT D 

In simplified 6502 assembly language 
this would look like this: 

LDAD 

CLC 

ADCE 

SEC 

SBC #8 

STAD 

JSR $FFD2 

Notice how 4 program lines have deve- 
loped into 7 in the assembly language 
version. The BASIC interpreter inside 
your machine has performed this auto- 
matically for you and converted your 
BASIC program into a language under- 
stood by the processor. In point of fact, 
assembly language is not the true lan- 
guage used by the processor since there 
are furthersteps required. Theseare the 
conversion of the assembly language 
into hexadecimal op-codes which gives 
the following: 

A9 04 

18 

69 06 

38 

E9 08 

8D04 

20 D2 

FF 
This hopefully explains the differences 
between a high-level and a low-level 
language. In basic terms, the higher the 
level, the slower the execution since it 
has to pass through these stages of 
translation until it reaches a language 
form understood by the processor, 
which is binary numbers. The PETS- 



PEED compiler takes the users high- 
levelcode, in this instance Commodore 
BASIC and shifts it closer to low-level 
code. The code created by PETSPEED 
is termed p-code or psuedo-code since 
it is not machine code, rather assembly 
language which has been optimsed for 
speed of execution. In effect the inner 
workings of the compiler are a unique 
language peculiar to PETSPEED. Thus 
the two fundamentals of how a compiler 
operates are the ability to translate the 
high-level language into a language the 
processor understands and secondly, 
the optimisation or refinement of this 
internal code for maximum execution 
speed. 

The product for the C64 and C1 28 are 
supplied on a single 1541 format disk 
together with a manual. Both use the 
novel coloured matrix as a means of 
copy protection although the C64 man- 
ual makes mention of a security dongle 
for this version which appeared to miss- 
ing from the package sent to me. 
The manuals are fairly terse and 
assume that you are an experienced 
programmer — a not unrealistic app- 
roach since compilation is not going to 
produce any benefits on a program run- 
ning to a few lines of BASIC and most 
experienced programmers are going to 
be producing substantial volumes of 
source code. 

The C64 version of the software is 
able to cope with most nuances of 
standard Commodore BASIC 2.0 other 
than the inclusion of LIST, RUN and 
SAVE. Dynamic arrays cannot be com- 
piled since PETSPEED cannot look 
ahead and compute the ultimate size of 
these. Thus statements such as: 

10DIMX(Y) 
will not be accepted and unhappily 
compilation will stop dead in its tracks 
meaning a complete and tedious restart. 
The acceptable form for arrays is: 

10DIMX(25) 

It would have been nice to be able to 
recover from this and divert errors into 
an errors file although I've probably 
been spoilt by using AMIGA compilers. I 
could not get this version of PETSPEED 
to accept that I was using a 1571 drive, 
the system kept defaulting to the snail- 
like 1541, although in all fairness the 
1571 was unknown at the time PETS- 
PEED 64 was designed. The address 
location of each variable and array can 
be located by a running a utility program 
named REPORT, a very useful and 
powerful facility with output to the 
screen or Commodore serial printer. 
The use of integer variables is strongly 
recommended by the software suppliers 



for best results with PETSPEED 64 — 
you should be doing this anyway 
although very few programming texts 
appear to point out the advantages of 
integers over floating-point variables in 
terms of saving memory. PETSPEED 64 
is still the best BASIC compiler for the 
C64, although in common with the 
hardware, it is beginning to show its 
age. 

PETSPEED 128 takes advantage of 
the superior hardware in terms of 
memory and processor clock speed — 
the compilation process can take place 
under 1.0MHz. or 2.0MHz. modes. The 
dynamic array problem is solved by halt- 
ing execution of the compilation cycle 
and requesting the user to input the 
array's size. Certain BASIC 7.0 state- 
ments such as RESTORE and COLLI- 
SION are restricted in that they cannot 
take an expression and must instead use 
a constant line number and RESUME 
NEXT is not supported although 
RESUME <line number> is. Extensions 
to BASIC 7.0 are fully supported by this 
version of PETSPEED and the manual is 
considerably more detailed than that for 
the C64 version. 

A powerful directive in PETS- 
PEED 128 overcomes the problem of 
BASIC 7.0's inability to redirect the 
standard input of the C128 — thus your 
program can support internal files. 

The manual gives some coverage to 
the problems associated with the 1571 
drive and provides techniques to 
over come this. There is an additional 
utility on the disk called ERRORS which 
will locate the line number of the prob- 
lem area in yoursource code, again very 
useful. Overall PETSPEED 128 is a piece 
of software no serious programmer can 
afford to be without. Do not be misled 
into thinking it will improve the quality of 
your BASIC programming — bad source 
code remains bad source code and no 
compiler on Earth will change this. 
There is no question that PETSPEED 
will improve the execution speed of your 
program and provided your source 
code is clean, that is error-free, based 
on solid algorithms and follows the 
recommendations in the complier man- 
ual, execution speeds can approach 
that of true machine code without the 
considerable hassles assembly language 
undoubtedly makes. PETSPEED has 
always been a good product and it has 
been made even better in the C1 28 ver- 
sion — highly recommended. 
Supplier: Systems Software (Oxford) 
Ltd. Tel. 0865 54195 

Prices: £49.95 (C128 Version) 
£39.95 (C64 Version) 



28 Commodore Computing November 1986 




OXFORD PASCAL 



^^ 



+ Full standard Pascal + extensions * Full Linker * Graphics and sound extensions 

* Speed... Fast to compile. Fast to run * Powerful Editor * 84 page tutorial/reference manual 
+ Resident (in ram) and disk compiler * Compact Code * Stand alone compiled programs 
OXFORD PASCAL includes TWO compilers: 

I) A resident compiler that runs in RAM just like a BASIC interpreter. Ideal for learning Pascal and debugging. 
2) A FULL disk compiler which lets you use the whole of memory for Pascal programs. 
\ The package includes a LINKER allowing modularisation and separate compilation PLUS a locator to 
create stand alone programs which run independant of the Pascal system. 



<0^55?£a 






\ UOfc "«***whA BOX. 



\ 




PETSPEED BASIC COMPILER 






• UP TO 40 TIMES THE SPEED OF BASIC • Program analysis utility included 

* Compiles ALL BASIC commands * Extensions to BASIC 

* Compatible with machine code * Long variable names option 

* Makes large programs smaller * Recommended by Commodore 

Using PETSPEED couldn't be simpler; just type in the name of your program, wait a few minutes and then see 
your software run up to 40 times faster. 



TH* 



\1» 



HACK-PACK including RAM-DISK 

The ultimate utility pack for the 1 28 



cortww 



* FULL TOOLKIT commands include FIND, CHANGE, DUMP, MERGE, TYPE, INFO etc 



Great Vawc 

•Amiga style RAM-DISK £39."* 

Imagine a disk drive like the 1 54 1 or 1 57 1 only many times faster. This is RAM-DISK. RAM-DISK responds to all the usual disk commands such as DLOAD, DSAVE, 
. DOPEN, COPY, APPEND, CATALOG etc and behaves exactly like a floppy drive. The only difference is that everything happens much faster. RAM-DISK is modelled 
on the RAM-DISKS supplied as standard on the AMIGA, the ST and the AMSTRAD and provides a way for you as a programmer to fully exploit the 1 28's large 
memory. The COPY command can be used to move files from a physical disk drive to RAM-DISK and vica versa. At the end of a session all the files held on RAM-DISK / 
can be backed up onto floppy disk. RAM-DISK is accessible from BASIC or machine code. It^AKl 

•THE COMPRESSOR l^is--* 

The compressor is a utility for compressing programs down to their minimum size. Just type in the name of your program, wait a minute or two and then see a new version 
with all spaces and REMs removed and with up to 255 characters packed onto each line. Makes your code smaller and faster and protects programs from unauthorised tampering. 

; Order Form 




Please rush me: (tick appropriate box(esj) 

□ PETSPEED 64 

□ PETSPEED 128 

□ OXFORD PASCAL 64 DISK 

□ OXFORD PASCAL 64 Cassette 

□ OXFORD PASCAL 1 28 

□ HACK-PACK 128 

□ THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL OFFER 



SEND YOUR ORDER FORM TO:" - — — " — ■ — — — — 

S.S.O.L 1 6B WORCESTER PLACE OXFORD OX I *| W Tel (0865) 54 1 95 
I enclose cheque/postal order for 



(prices include VAT. Please add £ 1 .50 p.p. U.K7C3.00 outside U.K.) 



NAME. 



ADDRESS . 



PHONE. 



MAKE ALL CHEQUES PAYABLE TO S.S.O.L 



Allow 1 4 days for delivery. 



COMMODORE 
PLUS-4/C16 

ELECTRIK PENCIL!!! 

A truely excellent high resolution art program. M 
masterpieces can be quickly drawn using the powerful facilities 
provided by this package The program is entirely written in 
high speed machine code and includes Variable pencil size. 
Variable drawing speed. Easy select cursor menu, pixel draw/- 
plot. freehand, lines, circles, flood, characters/letters plotted on 
high-res screen at any position, 121 colours all usable simul- 
taneously, hard copy to printer, load and save of pictures to 
cassette or disc, joystick or keyboard operation. Many other 
facilities too numerous to mention Complete with instructions. 
Bring some colour into your life with ELECTRIK PENCIL. 
Impressive results in no time at all. Amaze your friends!! 
Cassette only £7.95 
Disc only £9-95 



THE MIRROR - TAPE BACK UP 

Superb tape to tape back up copier calering for the majority of 
PLUS-4/C16 games Backs up both standard and FAST loading 
software All major loading systems catered for Very large 
menu of both general back up routines and popular games 
Basic, machine code and protected games all easily handled. 
NO extra hardware and NO second cassette unit are required. 
Easy to use with full instructions. Very popular utility. 
Excellent value, £7.95 



THE WAND TAPE TO DISC 



MERLIN ASSEMBLER 

100 o/o machine code assembler for the Plus-4/CT6 Very fast 
assembly of source code Easy entry/editing of code via the full 
screen editor. Full error messages pinpointing the errors. Full 
load/save and printer facilities Intelligent assembly. Variable 
names, labels, hex/decimal, text and data statements, remarks, 
post indexing of variables etc. Many other facilities too numer- 
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assembler Comes with instruction booklet and FREE booklet 
of machine code routines. 
Cassette £8.95. Disc £13.95 



BLACK CAT - CASSETTE 
CONVERTER 

Have you ever wanted to use your Plus-4 Wordprocessur, 
Spreadsheet, Business graphics etc with a cassette unit? This 
program allows you to save your files to cassette rather than disc 
{as forced to by Commodore) Quick, convenient, easy to use 
Only £3.95 



TAPE HEAD ALIGNMENT C1 6/Plus-4 



COPY KING - PLUS 

* Powerful copier for FAST LOADING programs 

* FREE this month a suite of additional back up rou 

* Back up copies are made on blank TAPES at ta 



required. 

* Very reliable loading sys 

* Buy the market leader 



The perfect cure for the 
cation as for the Commi 



>rity of loading problems Spe 
5 64 (see below). Only £6 95 



COMMODORE 64 

EVER HAD A LOADING PROBLEM? 



;h people appr 
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/1th a very large menu of 
We have had many letters 
te this utility. Don"t be left 



hen send off for WIZARDS "TAPE HEAD ALIGNMENT Kl 
1' no one should be without one' The most common cause c 
lading failure is bad alignment of your tape heads, This k 
lows you to set up the tape heads of your cassette unit for th 
ist possible loading conditions In many cases this will make 
imarkable difference in loading reliability. Our kit comprise 
■'. ( 1 ) A precision recorded cassette containing a sophisticate' 
st program (2) A special adjustment screwdriver (3) A direc 
jn indicator (4) A turning meter. (5) A detailed instructor 
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agnose any loading problems. All of this for only £6.95'!! 



BARGAIN JOYSTICKS!!! 

Incredible value Biand new Ouickshot II Joysticks 
£5.95 plus £1 00 for p&p Features include 



* New improved design 

* Fits any computer with Commodore/Atari joystick pc 
(Not the PIus-4/C16.) The best selling joystick m the worlc 



HALF PRICESPECIALTHIS MONTH!!! 

Copycat and Lightning Load together tor only £5 95. Separately 
£5.95 each, 

COPYCAT Our highly popular tape to tape back-up copier for 
Commodore/standard rate loading systems 

* Wizard sound effects 

* Cassette magic sense 

* Thousands sold. 

LIGHTNING LOAD II Converts almost all your slow loading 
games/programs into SUPERFAST TURBO loading versions 



excellent program 
RAPID dispatch of orde 



admg is over when you buy 



UK p&p FREE. Europeans please ADD 50p Ou 
ADD £1.50 for AIR MAIL Overseas orders welcc 
ments must be in pounds sterling 



Cheques/P.O.s to: 

WIZARD SOFTWARE 



(Dept. AA), 20 Hadrian Drive, Redhills, Exeter, Devon EX4 1SR 



Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's SUPER FELIX! He knows who 



Twang goes 
Jane 

I am not surprised that the 
name of Lady Jane ('Made 
in Heaven') Smith of Tele- 
comsoft is rarely off any- 
body's lips these days. Not 
only are there rumours that 
both the Archbishop of Can- 
terbury and the Pope per- 
sonally requested a photo- 
graph of her in her daringly 
cut nun's habit to keep in 
their vestries, but it has 
been reported to me by 
unimpeachable sources 
that the most exciting event 
at the PCW show was an 
'encounter' between the 
gorgeous Jane and none 
other than Sir Marc Pierson 
(his family owns The Finan- 
cial Times, Madam Tus- 
sauds etc). Jane who was 
wearing her now famous 
black rubber nun's habit 
apparently required the 
lower part (skirt I believe it 
is called) to be carefully 
'buffed' (not my word I 
assure you) with black 
cherry Blossom shoe pol- 
ish. To keep up my shine' 
as she charmingly put it. 

All 500,000 males at the 
PCW show volunteered but 
Sir Marc — whose family 
billions were founded on 
the fabulously successful 
Beyond software and who 
is reputed to have paid a 
cool 5 million dollars for 
the rights to Star Trek — 
was the incredibly lucky 
man. Apparently he, in true 
Star Trek mode, was deter- 
mined to boldly go where 
no man had gone before. 
The twang', I'm told was 



heard as far as London 
Airport. 

After his close encounter 
of the fourth kind with the 
wondrous Jane, Sir Marc 
looked pale and would only 
comment that 'Lady Jane 
was' heavenly, absolutely 
heavenly*. 

We also heard that Jane, 
who arrived at the show in a 
chauffeur driven Mercedes 
truck (a present from the 
German company for past 
spiritual services to the 
Mercedes Board of Direc- 
tors) to carry away her 'col- 
lection'. This was several 
thousand tee shirts donated 
willingly by every stand at 
the show in acknowledg- 
ment of ex-nun Janey 
Waney's successful prayers 
for the software industry. 
We understand she is 
modelling them wet' at a 
fashion show in a Jacuzzi in 
the Vatican on Christmas 
Eve. As everyone is saying 
these days 'Isn't Jane abso- 
lutely divine?' 



Barryhead 
Revisited 

I can reveal that Lady 
Amanda du Barry in a cor- 
porate coup d'etat has 
grabbed control of the entire 
U.K. Press Relationsempire 
of the fast-growing Ariola- 
soft. The lovely Lady 
Amanda, who a mere year 
or so ago joined Ariolasoft 
as Marketing Supremo 
Frank ('Tomorrow the 
World') Brunger's P.A., has 
now emerged not only 
looking like Dallas's Sue 
Ellen, but a winning-style 
player in Ariolasoffs giant- 
sized software successstory. 
Sources intimately close 
to Lady Amanda who is 
interestingly retiring for a 
press officer, refuse to pro- 
vide personal details — ('I 
have no personal life. I am 
entirely devoted to Ariola- 
soft') — and staunchly 
maintain that itwas not her 
aristocratic connections but 
her achievements in get- 




For King and 
Courtney 

Mr Courtney King, Sir — 
CCI's reviewer and world 
influence on the C 1 6 scene 
— during his recent visit to 
CCI Tower was less than 
impressed at our efficiency. 
His palatial mansion, it has 
a swimming pool on every 
floor and a full size golf 
course in the basement, in 
wildest Hants is run like a 
military establishment. So 
he sent his sister famously 
beautiful (Miss Jamaica 
1985) Beverly-Angela to 
sort us out. 

Beverly-Angela reputedly 
is the most brilliant student 
ever to have studied eco- 
nomics at any university. 
She is also a highly in 
demand and very highly 
paid business consultant 
with clients like IBM, and 
next chairman, her brother 
Michael, is thought to be 
the largest shareholder, 
beating Shell, and the UN. 
The billionaire Sultan of 
Brunei is said to be madly 
in love with her and to have 
offered her a position as 
'close personal adviser'. 
'Name any price and I will 
throw in the largest dia- 
mond in the world', he said. 
She told us. 'I have no inten- 



| tion of accepting such 
minor offer. Anyway, my 
chef who used to work in 
the fabulous Beewea Res- 
taurant doesn't like Brune- 
ian plmentoes.' 

CCI could only afford 
about 89 seconds of 
Beverly-Angela King's in- 
credibly expensive time 
but in that short period she 
has brought her amazing 
brain to bear and solved 
all of our problems. 'She 
swept through our organi- 
sation,' said Dry Fly Sherri 
CCI's production princess 
with her usual brillant turn 
of phrase 'like Hurrican 
Charlie'. I can assure you 
that even the shortest ac- 
quaintance with Mr Court- 
ney King, Sir or his extraor- 
dinary sister could change 
your life. It has certainly 
changed mine. 

Beverly has now gone off 
to re-organise the World 
Bank which she is financ- 
ing with her own money. 
'Capitalism is on the way 
out... If s time somebody 
sorted out this global mess,' 
she said casually as she 
left in her solid gold Rolls 
Royce. If anybody can do 
it, it will be Ms. Beverly- 
Angela King. Dont be sur- 
prised if the whole world 
ends up ruled by a King. 



ting top golfers to, I quote, 
'play around' and a certain 
large American gentleman 
(called, I believe, 'Refrig- 
erator') to touch base' that 
gave her the newpress job. 
I'm sure those scurrilous 
rumours concern onyl Ario- 
lasoffs smash hits 'Golf 
Construction Set' and 
Touchdown' football game, 
not the cool Lady Amanda 
herself. But who can tell 
these days? By the way, I 
fear Lady Amanda, whose 
family estate includes fab- 
ulous pearl bearing oys- 
terbeds off the east coast of 
the U.K., is purchasing a 
new automobile. Her Fer- 
rari broke down while she 
was practising! or the Grand 
Prix at Brands Hatch, 
storming off the track in 
spite of a personal apology 
from Enzo Ferrari himself, 
snarling about having to 
push this old banger' she 
immediately ordered a 
Lamborghini. Ah yes, as 
Scott Fitzgerald said to Lady 
Amanda's Grandmother's 
butler, the rich are different 
from the rest of us. 



N'eau 
Comment . . . 

I hear that John Picking the 
live wire marketing supremo 
of Addictive Games had a 
real problem when his hotel, 
the Dorchester I believe, for 
the PCW, period ran out of 
water. The Management 
were at their wits end till 
John Picking used his con- 
siderable influence with the 
chairman of the Metropoli- 
tan Water Board and had a 
truck of ice cubes brought 
in as a stop gap to enable 
everyone to clean their teeth 
at least. 

Addictive have an Ameri- 
can Football game ready 
to hit the streets shortly. 
John told me that he is 
selecting the most beauti- 
ful girls in the world for a 
team of cheerleaders start- 
ing with the smashing girl 
featured in their tee shirt 
ads. It seems that she is 
Miss World Football and 
believe it or not turned out 
to work at John's local pub. 
John, the spoil sport, 
wouldn't tell me if she was 
as good at Addictive Games 
as she looks. 



30 Commocft Computing November 1986 



you are! And why! 



k PpNT TbocH -mi 5 t5C>I5 Qxi-Yde 1 



Loud Show Report 

IN 




That nice Sir George Jefferson, he's the 
Chairman of British Telecom and gives 
me all my phone calls free, tells me that 
they have discharged the previous Boss 
of Firebird so thatthey could takeon the 
world famous Open Champ golferTom 
Watson. I must say Tom is a real 
sportsman. He offered to come and play 
around with Anthony Mael's gorgeous 
grandmother who happened to be on 
CCI's Stand. Evenoffered to help theold 
lady clean herteeth with his niblick, I am 
told. Really good sports these Firebird 
chappies, especially in the bunkers. 

And what's this I hear about Ariolasoft 
and Electronic Arts? Are the true lovers 
splitting up? And is divorce in the air for 
US Gold and Microprose? And howwas 
it that nobody had told John Philips of 
Activision that his company had an 
AMIGA Gamemaker out (My Editor 
swears that when he told Johny about it, 
Activsion's Marketing Wiz rushed off 
and was never seen again!) If it comes to 
that why was Activsion's bigboss look- 
ing so lonely on his Guiness Book of 
Records Stand? And where was Argus 
Press, have they given up any connec- 
tion with the computer industry. (My 
Editor says that if it weren't for Peter 
Holme and Bugbyte, we'd all be asking 
Arguswho? He thinks that'sajoke!) And 
where was Pauline (Bondage — Endu- 



rance — There is such a thing as a C16 
International Karate) Garsden? Hiding 
under the empty On the Hook Stand I 
suppose. And why was that disgusting 
Tiny Julie Rosen parading round the 
Show with a man who he claimed was 
his father! A likely story. Nobody who 
writes for this magazine would have a 
dad who would openly admit to owning 
a nasty obscene AT**I! Of course the 
man who really runs the world is not Sir 
BobGedditoff, butSir David Carlos ''.He 
is, I can reveal, the power behind eve- 
ryone, everywhere in the computer 
world. I have to tell you that I saw him 
talking earnestly to everyone on every 
stand simultaneously. Echoing through- 
out the hall, like Midas' words to the 
grass, was the phrase. "I have solutions 
for all your problems." Sir David can 
help you too withyour personal orcom- 
puter problems. Write to him c/o the 
illegible Michael Boxter 007, Brighton 
Pier, with s.a.e. of course. 

I have to offer apologies to everyone. 
CCI committed the heinous sin of put- 
ting a tacky game on one of the sexy 
new 64s on our stand at PCW. It must 
have been frightfully boring as one little 
kid actual ly fell asleep over it and had to 
be carried away snoring by his fat dat. 
What was the game that got theSt Felix 
of Boredom Prize? I wouldn't dream of 
telling you it was Thanatos's Sanxion. 
And by the way, just to confuse matters 
we hear that there is now to be a game 
called Thanatos. Bore them all to death 
is what I say. 

I heard at the Show or rather I had 
79,000 out the claimed 80,000 that had 
been printed thrust into my pocketsand 
handbag that a newcomputer mention- 
ing newspaper called 'Plop' I believe 
was being published. The MD, Tony 
Stock, my Editor tells me has the most 
impudent way of approaching ouradver- 
tising sales staff — he offered one of 
them, Max the Ad, who happened to be 
driving past Olympia in his solid plati- 
num Rolls about a million pounds a 
month to go and work for this so-called 
"newspaper". I read with attention all 
79,000 of the copies thrust at me and 
couldn't find an interesting or correctly 
spelt word about computers. It did have 
the name Tony Hetherington all over it 
so I suppose that might be the reason. 
Still, perhaps anything would be better 
than the other PCW— Popular Comput- 
ing Weakly. They managed to mention 
the new 64s at the Show but not that 
they were on CCI's Stand. Oh aren't we 
just green with envy darling! I suppose 
they must be shaking in their shoesy- 
woosies. How would you like someone 
to come and 'plop' all over your weakly 
doorstep? Or is it, in view of how boring 
it has become, called being 'banged to 
rights'? 



Adios, 
Amigos! 




SONGS OF 
DISTANT EARTH 

Arthur C. Clarke 
Grafton — £9.95 



Science fiction novels usually conjure 
up images of space wars, ray guns and 
other bizzare ideas. Reading Arthur C. 
Clarke' novel, The Songs of Distant 
Earth, may change your outlook as to 
the ideas with which science fiction can 
deal. This novel is so much more than 
the exploits of a heroic figure in outer 
space and his equipment of this ultra 
modern era. It examines human rela- 
tionships and the impact one civilisation 
has on another. 

The novel deals with the relationships 
that follow between the Thasalssans 
previously 'seeded' from human stock, 
and the wakened survivors of a doomed 
earth, travelling in a hypership until then 
kept in suspended animation. The survi-/ 
vors land on Thalassa in search of ice to' 
repair the protective shield of their 
spacecraft. Clarke looks at the relation- 
ship between woman, man and his 
environment and political conflict so 
accurately, one feels he is writing of the 
earth now, for there are so many paral- 
lels between Thalassa and earth today. 
Clarke does this extremely well by care- 
fully blending science fact with imagina- 
tive fiction. Examples of this can be seen 
when he writes about certain tech- 
niques used by the earth survivors all of 
which link directly with scientific theory 
held by scientists today. Also impres- 
sive is the way he talks about religion in 
his work. He gives us food for thought 
by suggesting a possible development 
for the many conflicting religious faiths 
that exist today. 

On the whole I found the book 
extremely well written and it makes 
enjoyable reading for all ages as there 
are themes included to interest eve- 
ryone. A book I would recommend to all 
to read for it brings to light some of the 
more serious issues that fact us today 
and their implications for the future. 
Arthur C. Clarke has yet again proved 
his great gift for building upon science 
of today and many of the issues that 
surround us to bring a book that is more 
of predictive value than fantasy. Let us 
hope he continues to set the pace in 
science fiction writing and goes on pro- 
viding us with such brilliantly written 
novels of ourselves, our environment 
and our knowledge. B A K 



cutest Felix 



Commodore Computing November 1986 31 



//n$ide/njfO k 




Check for Yourself! 



Bulletin 1000 



CCI brings you once again exclusive 
news of what the marvellous Bulletin 
1000 will be showing in the coming 
month at quality computer stores around 
the UK. (Does any other country have the 
same idea going?) 

Led by the svelte, high-voltage Julie 
Inskip, Bulletin 1000 sets out to present 
you with an entertaining half hour video 
that gives you a chance to see before you 
buy the hottest properties on the current 
games market. Here you can see the 
latest list of goodies that Bulletin 1000 
will parade for your delectation. If your 
own local computer store isn't showing 
you Bulletin 1000's latest taster of 
what's going on in the GamesWorld, ask 
them why! Keep up the great work, Jump- 
ing Julie! 



HEUSON 


ALLEY HAT 


ANCO 


THAI BOXING 


ANCO 


SPORTS 4 


MIRRORSOFT 


ZYTHUM 


ADVANCE SOFTWARE 


HARDBAL L 


BEAU JOLLY 


COMPUTER HITS 3 


DURELL 


THANATOS 


DUREL L 


BIG 4 


ARIOLASOFT 


DEACTIVATORS 


ARIOLASOFT 


CAMEL OT UARRIORS 


ARIOLASOFT 


MARBLE MADNESS 


ARIOLASOFT 


THEY STOLE A MILLION 


OCEAN 


HIGHLANDER 


OCEAN 


GAL VAN 


OCEAN 


MIAMI VICE 


OCEAN 


THE GREAT ESCAPE 


OCEAN 


STREETHAUK 


OCEAN 


NIGHTMARE RALLY 


IMAGINE 


HONAMIS GOLF 


H^I^RH 



IP* 

£38© 

m-i-i 



XYCLOff DIA SMACTIffA cw.-^^ 



HOD /T THERE, DUCK. 
^Aj'VE GOT YOU CWEREO. 



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€^# Qscommodore 



computer show 



LOCATION 



Champagne Suite & 

Exhibition Centre, 

Novotel, Hammersmith 

London W6 



PRESENTTIME 



Looking for ideas for gift 
Take your pick from mai 
thousands of products 
from stocking fillers to 
major presents, including 
all the latest software and 
hardware releases. 







■ 






i*r 




■ 






1 



RANGE 



On show: the 
entire Commodore 
family - from the 
C16 and Plus 4 to 
the 64, C64, C128 
and the fabulous 
Amiga. 



MUSIC HALL 



When the versatile C64 takes to 
the stage you'll be treated to an 
amazing kaleidascope of sound 



M ■ ■ i IFTfSM 



■^j HOURS 



10am-6pm Friday 
November 21 

10am-6pm Satu 
November 22 

10am-4pm Sun 
November 23 



Windows, icons 
and pull-down 
menus - see the 
innovative GEOS in 
action. 



AMIGA VILLAGE 



The centrepiece of the whole show - this 
is where you'll see for the first time the 
exciting new products that will make the 
Amiga the most talked-about computer 
range of them all. 




Write today for 
your advance 
tickets. Walk past 
the queues and 
save money too - 
£1 per head off 
the normal 
admission p 



Everyone who's anyone in the growing 
Commodore world - including a number 
of mystery celebrities. The last time a 
Commodore Show was held in London it 
attracted a record 20,000 visitors. 



■ Advance ticket orders l 

Please supply: 

"] Adult tickets at £2 (saved) £_ 

I I Under-16s tickets at £1 (save £1 1 £ _ 



Total £. 



] Cheque enclosed made payable to 
Database Publications Ltd. 

J Please debit my credit card account 



Access 



I I I I I L_ 



Visa 

Admission at door: 

£3 (adults), £2 (under 16s) 



9th official November 

Cm. commodore 21-23 

computer show 1 986 

Post to: Commodore Show Tickets, 
Europe House, 68 Chester Road, 
Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 SNY. 



Name ... 
Address 



Signed 



PHONE ORDERS: Show Hotline: 061-456 8836 
PRESTEL ORDERS: KEY *89, THEN 614668383 
MICROLINK ORDERS: MAILBOX 72:MAG001 

Please quote credit card number and full address, Ref. CCMI 




War-Martech 

If, when you read an inlay card and 
you read about blasting aliens, you 
put it down straight away, well, my 
message to you is 'dont judge a book 
by its cover' nor WAS by its inlay 
card. 

Although WAR is a shoot-em-up 
game, it's not like your run-of-the- 
mill, what another old shoot-up game. 
It does resemble 'Starforce' a little, 
but instead of the screen running 
from top to bottom it scrolls from left 
to right. It is also much harder than 
'Starforce'. It is the usual story of 
aliens heading towards earth and 
you've been chosen (whether you 
like it or not) to fight them off. Do 
games designers read nothing but 
old fashioned SF? 

This alien planet is kept going by 
twenty cylinders and they're all 
linked together. Some are residen- 
tial, some are military etc. Each 
cylinder is connected via an escape 
portal, for the VIP aliens to escape if 
you manage to destroy the cylinder. 
When the game starts, aliens will 
come flying at you. When you've des- 
troyed all the aliens, the screen will 
go a different colour and a count- 
down will start. You then must get 
into the cylinder to destroy it. You 
have to choose the right colour code 
to get out. 

WAR has a smart way of doing the 
loading screen, but it does take a 
long while to load so go and make a 
cuppa or something! 

The graphics are sharp and clear 
and easily recognisable. The sound 
is also very good. The high score 
table is quite hard to read but is quite 
well done. Overall it's one of the best 
games released recently where you 
can let your aggression really hang 
out. 



Martech is beginning to emerge as 
a top games house. Some of the 
squarer critics may have looked 
down their nose at the Samantha Fox 
release but the games playing pub- 
lic certainly took it. WAR is a very 
good follow up to that successful 
release. 




34 Commodore Computing November 1 986 




Miami Vice — Ocean 



You've seen them on TV. You've heard 
the pop songs. Now take on the role 
of drug-buster in the exotic city of 
Miami in the scuffed designer-label 
shoes of Crockett and Tubbs. Like, 
man, yeah, uh . . . if you know what's 
good for you, like let's go for it . . . 
Crockett and Tubbs, man, have just 
heard that a one million dollar 
shipment of contraband goods is 
due in the city on Thursday. All you 
know is that these big deals usually 
take place under cover of darkness 
on Sunday- Your task is to squeeze 
out as much info as you can by inter- 
rogating all drug dealers you know 
of. You start off with the scum of the 
city and go downhill from then on, 
ending up with the big cheese of the 
place. (The big cheese! Cheddar or 
Camembert? Ed.) The top people will 
have more information if you don't 
shoot 'em first. 

To carry out your task you are 
supplied with a car that would do 
James Hunt extremely well. You must 
drive round the streets of Miami 
trying to discover the hideouts of the 
drug dealers. The car has pretty easy 
controls with accelerator, brakes and 
left and right turns. If you are travel- 
ling too fast or too slow you car will 
not turn correctly. When you get to a 
location that you'd like to investigate, 
you must stop on the desired road 
and get out. Your car display will 
change. If you find a bag of contra- 
band, it can be collected by walking 




over it. Your boss has provided you 
with a timetable of where crooks will 
be at what time (very useful!). 

The graphics are pretty small and 
pretty weedy but the sound is smart 
and closely resembles the MV theme 



tune. Overall a nice try at a smart TV 
prog. I think Ocean could have come 
up with another winner! Certainly the 
TV series has got millions of fans so 
why not the game? 
O.K. my man, let's hit 'em! 




GRisp 



Commodore Computing November 1986 35 



/ AHfiL WHAT A LW£Klf DA 1 /.... FOR A WALK TO TfiL SHOPS, 



A HER£ WE 



jvimtm 




Gremlin Graphics Software Ltd., 
Alpha House, 10 Carver Street, 
Sheffield S1 4FS. Tel: (0742) 753423, 
Telex No: 547274 



MSX-AMST. 



AR£ ^fOM TOO MMCfi Of A WIMP TO PLAf THIS ^AML 




Leapin Louie 

You care special agent Louis Mooney 
(Leapin' Louie to his friends) and 
you've been captured by some bad 
guys (by the evil forces of the Grong 
Empire actually, but who cares?), so 
you have to escape. To do this you 
must get to the shuttle bay, passing 
through ten rooms on the way, col- 
lecting batteries in each room to 
work the transporter that gets you to 
the next room (Phew! I'm glad that 
bits over). 

There you have it, a perfect setting 
for a colourful platform game that is 
(in my opinion) the best of its type on 
the C16. I played this game at the 
Commodore Show on the Audiogenic 
stand and I was impressed. My view 
of it this time confirms my original 
opinion. 



On each screen you pass through 
there is the usual sprinkling of 
hazards and dangers and, unusu- 
ally, there is the added problem of 
dying if you fall from a great height 
(Dont people generally? Ed.). Robots 
are also on the prowl but they only 
walk from left to right and are usually 
quite easy to Jump over. 

While all this is going on there is 
music blaring out in the background 
- sound and graphics seem to be get- 
ting better with every release now, 
and this game is no exception to a 
welcome trend, even if your man 
does rather look like a matchstick 
bird. The graphics are well above 
average. This is the best platform 
game I have played for the CI 6. A 
good buy. 




Robo Knight 

Robo Knight is US Gold's first Ameri- 
can C 1 6 game and if future releases 
live up to this standard, they will do 
well. 

At first glance it looks terrible - 
chunky graphics, stupid storyline 
and 'only thirty-two rooms to explore. 
However, all terrible thoughts soon 
leave as you start playing the game. 
You have to collect fifteen shields 
dotted around the castle so you can 
reach the Sword of Power (Yawn . . . 
how original!). There are three types 
of obstacles trying to stop you in your 
quest for the Sword. First are the drills 
which descend from the ceiling to 
smash on your head (ouch, nasty!), 
second are the stepping stones over 
the water. You have to jump across 
these and lastly, but not leastly (eh? 
Ed.) are the wells which slide open 
and shut — passing these takes not a 
Utile skill. 



As you toddle around the 
castle you may find black 
holes in walls and green 
patches on the floor. These 
are doors. The green 
patches are doors in front 
of you, the black holes doors 
behind you. There are 
ladders to climb as well, 
which lead to upper floors. 
On one screen there is a 
piece of black screen which 
hides a door. 

This game is a strange 
mixture of arcade adven- 
ture and laddrs and plat- 
forms which is a refreshing 
change. It has good gra- 
phics and gameplay but 
(though only one sound effect) but is 
a good buy for £2.99. What I want to 
know is why they called it Robo 
Knight! 




Commodore Computing November 1986 37 





destined to go to the top of the CI6 
charts as well (unless Winter Events 
stops it). 

It involves you, Monty Mole trying 
to escape to do this you must go 
through some thirty screens, collect- 
ing gold coins from each location to 
become a mole of leisure. There are 
secret passage ways is surprising 
places and you must go through pla- 
ces like the sewage works, (I won- 
dered what that smell was) a tree 
stump and a house. The graphics in 
all locations are brilliant especially 
in the sewage works but the sound 



m 




leaves a lot to be desired a dull 
thump of the pulverisers and a crash 
when you die. 

A famous friend of mine (who shall 
remain nameless) actually prefered 
this version to the 64 one saying 
"even though it didnt have great 
music and loads of screens, it was- 
more playable and not so frustrating 
— allowing you to explore the 
locations." 

Nice one Gremlin how about an 
unofficial, cut down Gauntlet type 
game, I'm sure you could do it. Get 
out and grab this smash now! 



C0URTN£yKlN& 

s/ns 
"GETOUTMP 

Gfimms t 

SMf&HNQUL 



so. 





38 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



The f%A Software Centre 

\^ 1 PRINOFTON STREET LONDON WC1R4AL- TEL: 01 -430 0954 



The specialist centre for Commodore 64, 128 and Amiga 

Selected items from stock (disk): 



C64(orC128in64mode) 



Flight Simulations 

Sublogic Flight Simulator II (d) £44.00 

Flight Simulator II (t) f 38.00 

Jet(d) £39.00 

Scenery Disks (set) (d) £90.00 

Star Disk (S. Francisco) (d) £20.00 

Scenery Disk (Japan) (d) £20.00 

Submarine Simulations 



S.H. 



Gato(d) £24.00 



Space Simulations 

SSI Imperium Galactum (d) £33.00 

SSG Reach forthe Stars (d) £39.00 

Cygnus StarFleet(d) £44.00 

War Simulations 

AvalonHill Panzers East (d) £33.00 

Legionnaire (d) £33.00 

Dreadnoughts (d) £33.00 

Tsushima (d) £33.00 

SSI Breakthrough in the Ardennes (d) £40.00 

Computer Ambush (d) £48.00 

Kampfgruppe (d) £48.00 

Battle Group (d) £48.00 

Mech Brigade (d) £48.00 

Operation Market Garden (d) £48.00 

Colonial Conquest (d) £33.00 

Carrier Force (d) £40.00 

Wings of War (d) £33.00 

50 Mission Crush (d) £33.00 

Geopolitique (d) £33.00 

Field of Fire (d) £33.00 

Cosmic Balance (d) £33.00 

Six Gun Shootout (d) £33.00 

Fighter Command (d) £48.00 

USAAF(d) £48.00 

Panzer Grenadier (d) £33.00 

Battle of Antietam (d) £42.00 

Nam(d) £33.00 

Battalion Commander (d) £33.00 

Slim Canada Gettysburg (d) £54.00 

Seventh Fleet (d) £54.00 

Fifth Eskadra £54.00 

Sim Canada Golan Front (d) £48.00 

Grey Seas Grey Skies (d) £48.00 

Fall Gelb (d) £48.00 

Sieg in Africa (d) £48.00 



SSG 



Barac 
DKG 



Carrers at War (d) £48.00 

Europe Ablaze (d) £48.00 

Battle Front (d) £39.00 

Road to Moscow (d) £39.00 

Clash of Wills (d) £49.00 



Business Simulations 

SSI Cartels & Cutthroats (d) £33.00 

RailsWest(d) £39.00 

Bluechip Millionaire (d) £33.00 

Tycoon(d) £33.00 

Baron(d) £33.00 

Sports Simulations 

SSI Computer Quarterback (d) £33.00 

Ringside Seat (d) £33.00 

Prof. Tournament Golf (d) £33.00 

Sublogic Football (d) £35.00 

Baseball (d) £35.00 

Avalon Hill Superbowl Sunday (d) £33.00 

Fantasy Adventures 

Avalon Hill Mission to Jupiter (d) £35.00 

Quest of Space Beagle (d) £35.00 

SSI Phantasie II (d) £33.00 

Wizard's Crown (d) £33.00 

RingsofZilfin(d) £33.00 

Datasoft Alternate reality (d) £1 4.00 

Origin Ultima IV (d) £50.00 

Text Adventures 

Broderbund Brimstone (d) £39.00 

Essex (d) £39.00 

Carmen S. Diego (d) £39.00 

Infocom Ballyhoo (d) £39.00 

The Witness (d) f39.00 

Spellbreaker (d) £39.00 

Trinity (1 28, 80 cols) £39.00 

Graphic Adventures 

Telarium Amazon (d) £19.00 

Dragonworld (d) £19.00 

Fahrenheit 451(d) £19.00 

Polar OoTopos(d) £39.00 



All prices include VAT. Add £1.00 forp&p 

Credit cards (Visa/Access) telephone orders accepted 

Hours: 10.00 am/6.00 pm (incl Saturdays) 




CCI Rating 



/^ 



\JiETNAM WAS 



" ■ - ■ " *■■■ 



& 






*"/A."{--J." , ^" , i — wJ 



fefStL^nne I'LL T&f h 





1 



Green Beret by Imagine 

Sambo run! Commando make way! 
Here comes Green Beret, the hottest 
new war game for the 64. Green Beret 
is harder than Commando and more 
challenging than Rambo. You play 
the hero of the movie and your task is 
simple. Rescue your fellow Green 
Beret wearers who have been taken 
prisoner. You must battle your way 
through four hectic levels to achieve 
our goal, avoiding various guards 
such as commanders, bazooka men 



and ordinary soldiers of the blue, 
brown and green variety. All the 
above can easily be destroyed with 
just a little help from your trusty knife. 
More weapons can be obtained such 
as flamethrower and other pieces of 
lethal equipment when you manage 
a personal victory. For example, when 
you eliminate a commander you get 
a flamethrower. 

Graphically, Green Beret is great 



with some smart touches, like during 
the use of a flamethrower. The char- 
acters are a little plain but the back- 
drops are highly detailed. Sound is 
also very good, with a constant drum 
beat during the game, various spot 
effects and a nice catchy tune at the 
title page. I enjoyed Green Beret a lot 
and found it surprisingly addictive. 
It's a very worth-while conversion 
from the arcade version. But do they 
have to go fighting Vietnam forever? 



Wee: £8.95 
Graphics: **** 
Sound: **** 

cSES^**** 
1 Rating: MEGA 



CCI Rating 




COURTNEY |ON6-5fcV$ 



w 



Jettrix 

Yet another game by Gremlin Gra- 
phics, this time a Jetpack kind of 
game mixed with a 'Breakout' theme. 

You control a small man with a jet- 
pack and you must shoot the rain of 
falling bricks that threaten to build 
up or fall on your head. The object of 
the game is to break out of the cavern 
or last for a certain time limit. 

Also falling with the bricks are 
spinners, which once caught can be 
dropped onto the bricks to eat them 
away, bombs, which eat the bottom 
layers of bricks that the spinners 
cant handle, and bonus circles, 
which just increase your score. 



When you have made a gap in the 
bricks or your time has run out, you 
move into the next cavern where you 
start your frenzied activity all over 
again. 

I have a few gripes about this game 
though, especially about your man, 
perhaps he could of been drawn a 
little better Gremlin? Maybe 
he shouldn't have been made to 



Well done 
Gremlin ! 
More Plasty 



move so fast, eh? Isnt he a bit small? 
Not complaining you understand 
but... 

Well anyway, apart from that, this 
game is good and though the gra- 
phics are boring and there are a 
variety of sounds which go well with 
the game. Gremlin, unlike most 
companies, use the C16's sound 
capabilities well, and it shows in 
games like this or 'Reach for the Sky.' 
Well done Gremlin, more please. 




40 Commodore Computing November 1 986 




AND THEY CALL THEMSELVES 

ADULTS!!! 





The times they've 
left you at home 
because 'you're not 
grown up' or 'not old 
enough to come to the pub' 
and look what they get up to 
when they get there! Here's your 
chance to find out what it's really 
like in those smoke filled haunts 
of adulthood. The opportunity to 
see how good you are at these 
ADULT?? games. 
Why let the mums and dads 
have all the fun. Pub Games can 
be a laugh for everyone. 



a compilation of 

BAR BILLIARDS ■ DOMINOES 
DARTS TABLE FOOTBALL 
POKER & PONTOON 
BAR SKITTLES 

available on 

Commodore 64/128 ■ Spectrum 48K ■ Amstrad 
Available soon BBC - MSX 

Alligata Software Ltd., 1 Orange Street, 
Sheffield SI 4DW. tffl 

Tel: (0742) 755796 ..ftjlN* 




ALLIGATA BITES BACK 



ALLIGATA BITES BACK 





SURFCHAMP BY NEW 
CONCEPTS 

Because no-one at CCI ever goes 
near water (for fear it will spoil the 
whisky - hie!) we asked famed Corn- 
wallian surfer, Bob (Big Spume) Col- 
Iyer to dive in at the reviewing deep 
end. Here's the pearls he came up 
with. 




WATERPROOF YOUR 64 AND 
HANG TEN! 

As a computer fanatic and also a 
surfing freak I was looking forward to 
reviewing this particular programe. 
It come from New Concepts Ltd., Ire- 
land and claims to be the closest 
simulation to the sport you can get. 

The package includes a miniature 
surfboard to clip onto your keyboard 
and it is this which controls your rides 
. . . just like the real thing! The game 
starts by asking for your personal 
details and choice of surfboard and 
also wetsuit, dependant upon water 
temperature. 

After the wind and weather check, 
you stroll across Fistral Beach, New- 
quay in Cornwall. You then paddle 
your way through the rolling surf 
which rolls across the screen A quick 
turn and then you're up and riding, 
control then moves to the keyboard 
via the clip-on surfboard. Light 
touches on the board help you per- 
form all kinds of tricks, just like the 
professionals! 

Takes a lot to get used to, but well 
worth it. I found myself washed up on 
the rocks many times to begin with, 



but soon had the measure of the 
beast, surfing waves right up to the 
beach and performing incredible 
stunts. The more difficult, the more 
points. 

The graphics are crisp, consider- 
ing the subject matter, but the sound 
is non existent. This was most disap- 
pointing as maybe a Beach Boy 
soundtrack would have made this 
game more enjoyable. Perhaps New 
Concepts will note this and include 
music for their follow up programs 
planned for 1 987, in which it will be 
possible to surf other spots around 
the world. 

One nice point is another program 
on the reverse of the cassette which 
gives details of surfing history, lan- 
guage, manoeuvres, wave types 
and safety tips on the real aspect of 
surfing. 

Contact New Concepts, Ireland 
Ltd., 37 Dublin St., Carlow, Ireland. 



■ftfo 



Grapnj, 



e -£9.9 S 



tyA 



Sound- 



** 



'ff-atrsp 



42 Commodore Computing November 1986 




Scene 1 — 

Escape from the dungeon 



Scene 2 — 

Battle with the guards 



Scene 4 — 

Flying carpets and giant Roc birds 



Scene 5 — 

The sultan transforms himself into 
a dragon 



COMMODORE 



64/128 



Scene 3 — 

Protect your camels on the desert 

crossing 

THE LEGEND OF SINBAD for the Commodore 64/128 Game Author: Jason Benham. 

Set in the golden age of Caliph Al-Rashid, you play the role of the brave adventurer Sinbad the Sailor. You have been kidnapped and 

thrown into the dungeon of Sultan Salabim's fortress. But, retrieving your plundered treasure, you escape from the dungeon by battling 

your way past the guards and vultures through the serpent-infested tunnels. 

Once past the two dungeon gates, you stumble across a discarded sword. Just in time, because a second troop of fortress guards appear 

and a terrifying battle ensues. 

Conquering the guards, you now head for home transporting your valuables on a caravan of camels across the scorching desert to Baghdad. Bravely, you defend the 
camels against the incessant attacks of the deadly beasts of the sand. 

The Sultan Salabim, furious at your escape, orders his personal bodyguards aboard flying carpets and summons the giant Roc birds. Together, they form a cordon 
around Baghdad. Undaunted, you take to the skies, and the scene is set for a dramatic showdown high above the towers of the city. ( ,,,, 

The sultan has one remaining card to play. He can magically transform himself into a fire-breathing dragon spitting huge fireballs towards you. 
Can Sinbad triumph in this titanic struggle? 

Features include: 5 screens of action — each is a separate game in itself, 5 haunting tunes, beautiful graphics, impressive animation, and a 
ingenious password feature allowing you to skip screens which you have already completed once. 

PRICE: £9.95 (cassette), £11.95 (disc). 

PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES PRIZES 

If you complete the game, you can enter our competition. The prizes include a beautiful carpet, a curved knife and a hand-carved wooden 
horseman (all genuine Arabian products), and £50 in consolation prizes. 
Closing date: 31st March, 1987. 



'L 



SUPCRIOA 
SOFIUIAAC 



Dept. S4, Regent House, 
Skinner Lane, 
Leeds LS7 1AX. 
Telephone: 0532459453. 




24 HOUR TELEPHONE 
ANSWERING SERVICE FOR ORDERS 



OUR GUARANTEE 

• All mail orders are 
despatched within 24 
hours by first-class post 

• Postage and packing 
is free 

• Faulty cassettes and 
discswillbe replaced 
immediately. 





Beyond have anally sucumbed to the 
success of the compilation tapes. 
They've produced a compilation of 
four of their best selling games. The 



dont really know how people could 
like this game as I found it too hard to 
understand, even after dissecting 
the instructions line by line. Appar- 
ently an ambassador has plans for a 
new spaceship embedded in his 
spine. An evil character called Zoff 
has ambassadorknapped this guy 
with the plans in his spine and if Zoff 
discovers the plans he will be able to 
ravage any part of the universe. Your 
job is to rescue the ambassador, cap- 
ture Zoff and destroy Zoff s starship. 
You can do these in any order, but I 
should think it helps to get the 
ambassador fellow out before you 
blow the place up! 

All your inputs to the crew of the 
Shadowfire mission are done via on- 
screen icons. The instructions are 
long and tedious to understand. The 
graphics however, are great. They're 




tape consists of 'Quake Minus One', 
'PSI Warrior', 'Shadowfire' and 
'Enigma Force'. 

The RLF have sabotaged an under- 
water power station and it will shortly 
trigger a massive earthquake. The 
game begins on the day of sabotage 
thus Quake Minus One. there are 
four other computers that you must 
capture or destroy. Although Quake 
Minus One is at first, difficult once 
you've read the intructions thoroughly 
and had a few games it becomes 
considerably too easy. 

If you've ever wanted to know what 
it's like to ride in a hovercraft then 
have a bash at PSI Warrior. You must 
guide your PSI Warrior through dif- 
ferent levels of the home silo and 
eventually to the bottom to do battle 
with the source. I didn't like PSI War- 
rior all that much as there seemed 
very little going on. Graphics are a 
bit messy and the sound is mediocre. 

Beyond have included the hit game 
Shadowfire in amongst the tape. I 



clear and sharp and easily recog- 
nisable. Pity the rest of the game 
doesnt live up to them. 



Enigma Force is Shadowfire II. It is 
supposed to be The all action sequel 
to Shadowfire'. I did like 'Enigma 
Force 'better than Shadowfire 'cause 
it's easier (You're supposed to be a 
bright reviewer. Whatever happened 
to you? Ed) You can actually move 
your chosen person around the play- 
ing area. 

After you'd captured Zoff in 
Shadowfire, you were bringing him 
back to see the emperor. Before he 
left, Zoff declared war on the Empire. 
As you crossed the imperial border, 
Zoff used his psionic powers and 
made your ship crash into a planet. 
When you wake up . . . Zoff s gone. Oh 
no here we go again!! The plant 
you've crashed into happens to be 
one of your crew's home planet, 
Syylk, who is second command. 
Syylk's people, the Insectoids are 
fighting with Zoff s loyal followers, 
the Reptiloid stormtroopers. Your 
recommended course of action is a) 
Find the Insectoid leader and con- 
vert him to an ally b) Find a space- 
worthy ship in which to escape from 
the plant in and c) re-capture Zoff. 

Commands are again issued 
through icons on screen. All Beyond 
games are difficult but this is the 
hardest yet. Graphics are very sim- 
ilar to those of Shadowfire, but they 
are still good. 

These Beyond games seem to be 
designed with the idea that a game 
that's really hard to play is what's 
needed. What's really a good game 
is one that let's you acquire a skill 
and still staying ahead of you keep- 
ing you on the edge of a cliff of 
excitement. I think these games, 
except for Enigma Force', which I 
enjoyed, push you over the cliff of 'dif- 
ficulty'. Mot really a comfortable 
experience. 




** 



Payability 



** 



44 Commodore Computing November 1986 



TOP TWENTY 



C64 


b 


GAME TITLE 


1 Super Cycle 


2 Parallax 


3 Hollywood or Bust 


4 Miami Vice 


5 Knight Rider 


6 Ghosts & Goblins 


7 Speed King 


8 Strike Force Harrier 


9 WAR 



10 Dan Dare 



COMPANY 

US Gold 

Ocean 

Mastertronix 

Ocean 

Ocean 

Elite 

Mastertronix 

Mirrorsoft 

Martech 

Virgin 



Price C&) 


RATING 


9.95 


T.B.A. 


8.95 


Awesome 


1.99 


T.B.A 


8.95 


IFFY 


8.95 


T.B.A. 


9.95 


Awesome 


1.99 


Crisp 


9.95 


T.B.A. 


8.95 


Crisp 


9.95 


T.B.A. 



GAME TITLE 

1 Monty on the Run 

2 Speed King 

3 Kickstart 

4 Fingers Malone 

5 One Man & his Droid 

6 YieArKungFu 

7 Torpedo Alley 

8 Matrix/Laser Zone 

9 European Games 

10 Commando 



COMPANY 

Gremlin 

Mastertronix 

Mastertronix 

Mastertronix 

Mastertronix 

Imagine 

Firebird 

Llamasoft 

Tynesoft 

Elite 



Price (£) RATING 



6.95 


T.B.A 


1.99 


Crisp 


1.99 


T.B.A. 


1.99 


Crisp 


1.99 


T.B.A. 


7.95 


Crisp 


1.99 


T.B.A. 


6.95 


T.B.A. 


6.95 


T.B.A. 


7.95 


T.B.A. 



Compiled by CCI from leading distributors 




CCI Rating 




C16's Classics II 

As the title suggests this is the second 
compilation of so called Classics put 
together by Gremlin Graphics. It 
consists of a solar software game, 
Monkey Magic, one by Alligata Soft- 
ware called Blagger, English Soft- 
ware's brilliant Tlmeslip and Grem- 
lins awful Xargons Revenge. 

Ill start with the worst game and 
work my way upward to the best, that 
way I can get the rubbish out of the 
way quickly. 

The first, and definitely the worst is 
Xargons Revenge. Ironically this is 
by Gremlin, the people who put the 
compilation together. After beating 
the Xargon warriors in Xargon Wars 
you decide to wipe them all out on 
their planet, but someone told them 
and their lying In wait for you. The 
game Is set out like a horizontal 
space invaders, with you stuck at one 
end while hoards of enemies swarm 
from the other end. This may sound 
like a good game but with your 
movement limited to up and down 
incredibly boring gameplay and NO 




sound this game is useless. I dont 
know why Gremlin put it on the tape. 
Their games are usually great. 

The next game on my list, Monkey 
Magic. You are on the quest for the 
Holy Scriptures and you travel along 
on your cloud above a scrolling 
background of mountains. As you fly, 
a squad of flying Insects start attack- 
ing you and your only option Is to kill 
them. 

This happens over and over again 
for I dont know how long. Sounds 
boring? Well It does get a little bor- 
ing but it has good graphics and is 
presented well. Not a bad little game 
and a worthy addition to the tape. 

The next game is one that should 
be familiar to most CI 6 owners as it 
was one of the first games released 
for our computer, Blagger. To any of 
you not familiar with this 111 give you 
a rundown of its theme. 

You play Roger the Dodger (where 
have I heard that name before?) 
master burglar and you have to work 
your way through twenty rooms, col- 
lecting keys in each one to open the 
safes. Out to stop you are some really 
wierd guards. Take the mouth that 
would love to eat you or the rose 
bushes that kill you with one touch of 
their prickly thorns (just like my 
garden. Ed.). As If this weren't enough 
your air is running out and if it nap- 
ens to run right out, yes you've 
guessed it, you die. Each screen 



requires a little thought to crack and 
will provide a lot of satisfaction when 
you do. Two small problems are the 
graphics (a little crude) and the 
speed (very slow) but this is one of 



the first and still one of the best 
platform games ever for the CI 6. 

Now I come to the penultimate 
game in C 1 6's Classics, Tlmeslip. It's 
a kind of scramble game with three 
parts to it — all on one screen! Your 
job is to destroy the time orbs and 
synchronize time in all three parts to 
save the planet from destruction. 
The first part is on the planet surface 
in a starfighter, with ground based 
missiles, cannons and other offen- 
sive weapons to contend with. In the 
second part you have to jet through 
underground caverns, armed with a 
laser, taking out the orbs as you go. 
The third and final part is in a sub, as 
you torpedo the orbs and octopus' 
in your way. 





You switch to any of the parts at 
will, enabling you to master each of 
them before trying the real thing. 

This is a great game with stunning 
graphics and good sound. The other 
games are good as well (except 
Xargons Revenge) making this com- 
pilation really excellent value. 
Another plus is that all these games 
are fast loaders. Buy it! 




46 Commodore Computing November 1986 



GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK • GRIP STICK 
s < h 



y 

CL 

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it 

y 
fe 

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4, 



No 



w 



FINGER TIP 

CONTROL 

IS WITHIN 

YOUR GRASP. 



A totally new design gives instant response 
to your command movements. 

Up to now Joysticks ot the Speedking quality 
are priced at £20 and over, The Speedking is 

microswitch based, and costs only £12.99, 
£14.99 for BBC, DRAGON and C/16 machines. 

Designed to fit your hand, not the 
table top, meaning comfort during the 
longest of games. 

GUARANTEED for Twelve Months. 
Available for Spectrum 48K and 
Plus 4. Commodore 64, 128, C16 and Vic 20 
Atari, Electron, Amstrad, BBC and 
Dragon machines. 



konix 



A Major Breakthrough 
in joystick Design 



ONLY £12.99 



Trade and export enquiries 

Wyn or Sandra 

on (049525) 5913 



70 



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•dMD • >DI±S dWD • »DI1S dMD • >DI±S dlUD • >DI±S d WD ■ »DI1S dl*D • >DI±S dmO • XDI1S dmo 









Jail Break 

Rom the cover of this game you'd 
think that this was a Commando type 
of game involving lots of shooting 
and violence (hurray!) but this is not 
the case I'm afraid (Yah! Boo! Hiss!). 
What we do have is a game derived 
from the old breakout theme, but a 
good one. 

Your job is to demolish the wall of 
bricks with your massive demolition 
device (I beg your pardon! Ed.). To us 
mere mortals that's a ball. You do this 
using your bat, which slides along the 
bottom of the screen moving from left 
to right or vice versa. The movement 
of your bat is quite slow and some- 
times it is difficult to get to the ball in 
time. But fear not, one press on the 
fire button will boost your speed 
considerably. You'll go whizzing 
towards the ball at breakneck speed, 
sometimes whizzing right past it! 
Brakes, brakes you fool! The 'demoli- 
tion device' (ball) is akward to say 
the least, it bounces in every direction 
except the right one and sometimes 
rebounds against the wall and then 
goes exactly where you dont want it. 
(If s called not having a ball!) 





7h f£2 '^ 




Despite all this, Jail Break is incre- 
dibly addictive with great sound and 
above average graphics. It is extre- 
mely well presented with instructions 
in the game, keyboard and joystick 
options, a high score table and a 
training mode which gives you un- 
limited lives. 

At £2.95 this game is a must. 
Another winner from Martin Ganon, 
programmer of Leaper (reviewed 
September CCI). Bugbyte is certainly 
putting it together these days. 



>" 



I » 



\V 



Price: £2.95 
Graphics: •** 
Sound: •••• 
MayabiUty:**** 
Collating: MEGA 



48 Commodore Computing November 1986 




da te ""Basin 6 ?" oU t 
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.-Cez&tAmTttJL- 



Iridis Alpha 




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IRIDIS is the latest Llamasoft shoot- 
'em-up and at first playing it may 
remind you of Sheep in Space. If you 
take the time to go deeper into the 
game however you will find that 
there's more to it than that . . . much 
more. 

Perhaps I'd better make it clear 
from the start that this is no game for 
wimps, sissies or adventure freaks 
wanting a gentle introduction to the 
arcade scene. Learning to handle 
Gilby (the star of the show, a highly- 
manoeuvrable spiderish droid who 
just drips lasers) will take a good 
hour at least, so be prepared for 
some hassle at the start. Not that the 
game isnt tolerant of beginners; it is, 
at least for the first few waves. It's just 
that after wave two all hell breaks 
loose. Or so it seems . . . 

The game starts out a lot like 
Defender. Your Gilby warps in, look- 
ing like a ballbearing with a pointy 
bit on the front end. You find that you 
can turn and in either direction over 
the scrolling and rather pastoral 
planet surface; you can even land 
and scuttle about; and when you 
press the FIRE button things get 
rather tough for the aliens. However, 
as you settle into this familiar setting 
and start to kick some serious ass, 
you soon find out that things ain't 
quite what they seem. For a start, as 
soon as the vapoursin' starts to get 
good you always blow up! What's 
going on? 

The answer lies in the fundamen- 
tal theme underlying all of Iridis: 
energy. As you kill, so you gain 
energy, and if you overload yourself, 
bye bye Gilby. You have to drop off 
the energy by landing on the planef s 
Core. 

Once you understand this, you get 
to wave 3 and the LickerShips, where 
you die horribly. Then you have a 
brief respite while the Progress chart 
shows you just what a pathetic dent 
the first three waves make in the 
totality of the game, then it's back to 
battle to find that now you have two 



planets and two Gilbies, but one is 
upside down and back to front . . . 

Perhaps you're getting the idea 
that Iridis is a bit more than a mind- 
less shoot-'em-up. Yeah. You gotta 
think. You have to leam to transfer, to 
keep an eye on your Entropy and 
Energy levels, and to hang around 
the Core like a pervert in a pissoir. 
The game expects a bit of effort on 
your part while you're learning, but 
rewards you with 200 levels of sheer 
heavy-metal galactic blood and 
thunder at six million miles an hour. 
Beyond the main Iridis game 
there's a bonus game that you get 
into when the planet's Core is filled 
up. You have to traverse a vertically 
scrolling course while being hassled 
by a load of flying eyeballs. This sec- 
tion is a bit like pinbaU with no 
flippers and a jet-propelled ball, and 
it's worth doing well 'coz extra lives 
are to be had on completion. Iridis 
also has an unusual pause mode in 
that the pause mode is itself a game 
called MIF; MIF has a sub-pause- 
mode accessed by pressing the ' 
key, a demo of a rotating double 
helix generated using 96 sprites, 
relaxing to watch after a heavy spot 
of alien hassle. 

Basically, Iridis is a game for the 
Luke Skywalkers of the arcade game 
field. If you're not too confident of 
your joystick abilities you'll find it a 
tough challenge to match . . . but if 
you are one of the elite, if the Force is 
with you, then go for it! 



50 Commodore Computing November 1986 






LEAPER 

Amazing all action arcade animation and sonics 
6 really nasty gribblies, 6 levels, 3 tunes, and 
even the last VW. The game you've been 
waiting for... C1 6, C64. 




. ■■■.■■ .:■■■■■ 






■■■■ ■■['. ■ ■ "■# 



£2.99 



JEEP COMMAND 

Escape through unchartered enemy territory 

under ferocious fire. Drive that jeep, Fire those 

guns, Jump the ramps. It's fast, furious and 

addictive. C64, C16. 






Argus Press Software Group, Victoria House, Leicester Place, London WC2H 7NB. 01-439 0666. 
For mail-order and 'Byte-me' T-shirts (small, med, large: £3). 



— _ 



fsasB 




To do this you must fight, and beat, 
a variety of opponents (eight in all) 
all of whom have different fighting 
skills and weapons. 

First for chop (ha ha very funny, 
Ed.) is Buchu, a fat man who hurls 
himself through the air at you and is 
good at high kicks to the head (Nice 
guy!). Second is Star who likes throw- 
ing shuriken (Chinese stars) at you. 
She's also a dab hand at kicking you 
where it hurts most — know what I 
mean! Thirdly, is Nuncha, a master of 
the Nunchaka. He doesnt actually 
use it. He just waves it in front of him 
to scare you. Fourth is Pole who (sur- 



prise, surprise) uses a pole to hurt 
you and advances on you spinning it 
around in his hands, held high in the 
air. All these battles take place in 
front of a mountain with a flowing 
waterfall. Now you must load up the 
next four from the tape and battle 
them in front of a pagoda. The going 
gets tough as you try to fight a chain 
wielding opponent, if you beat him 




sary is Sword who wields (yawn, let 
me guess) a sword. He's one mean 
son of a (censored) to beat. 

At your disposal are six attacking 
moves; the ankle kick, lunge punch, 
high kick, rising kick, face punch 
and leg sweep. You can also jump, 
though only a pathetically short dis- 
tance (I'm 200 kilos, what do you 
expect? Ed.). 

The graphics are better than ever I 
thought they could be, though sound 
leaves a lot to be desired. It's also a 
mite too easy and you can get to 
Sword rather quickly. This doesn't 
detract from its playability but 
means that some might still be 
somewhat hungry when they com- 
plete it. 



you must fight the mean looking Club 
who uses a shield and club to beat 
you senseless. Fan is next on the list, 
she uses her deadly Ninja fan to beat 
you (is a Ninja fan as deadly as a 
football fan? Ed.). Your final adver- 



■*Wee;£7.P5 



*••• 



Sophies: ; 
■Sound; ** 



iff- 



^X*SP(Very) 



52 Commodore Computing November 1986 




Tomb of Tarrabash by 
Audiogenic 

You are an archaeologist extraor- 
dinary, Indiana Bloggs, heroic and 
resourceful explorer. You have found 
an ancient manuscript that gives 
you the whereabouts of the legend- 
ary Tomb of Tarrabash that is 
rumoured to be filled with treasure. 
Your lust for treasure draws you to go 
in search of riches, but as soon as 
you enter the tomb you find if s full of 
traps and deadly creatures. 

This is the setting for this Audio^ 
genie game, it may not be original 
but it sets the scene nicely and 
promises a good game. 

You start play in the first level of 
the tomb. Ifs inhabited with mum- 
mies which are produced from a 
column rather like the transporters 
in Star Trek. There are also metal 
bars which flash up and down very 
quickly, and a kind of portcullis 
which also moves up and down. To 
get past these you have to slow them 
down somehow. I wont tell you how 
though, you'll have to work that out 
for yourself. After you get out of that 
bit its up the stairs to the second part 
of the first level, which introduces 
pits of gunge. 



When you get to the second level 
instead of the mummies ifs snakes 
you have to contend with. They fire 
at you a lot and ifs wise to keep out 
of their way (Snakes fire at you? 
What sort of snake does that? Ed.). 




The worst thing about this game is 
its slowness, which gets a little 
annoying sometimes. But the gra- 
phics are quite good and they 
remind me of Audiogenics other 
release this month, Leapin' Louis. A 
good, enjoyable game with a great 
option that allows you to complete 
a level and if you get killed, start at 
that level again. 







Commodore Computing November 1986 53 



MUD: 



By Kate the Arch-Witch and 
Frobozz the Wizard 



Let us introduce ourselves, 
Kate the Arch-Witch (alias 
Margaret Lawton in 'real' 
life) is one of the longest 
playing people on Com- 
punet MUD, having been 
on the system almost since 
it's launch, and is virtually 
part of MUD now, so 'dis- 
tinctive' is her character 
and style. "I've seen a lot of 
players come and go, and 
made a lot of friends on the 
game. 

Frobozz the Wizard (Alias 
Ken Fomen) is a wiz from 
Essex MUD, the original 
game that started the whole 
craze off. 

We would like to reassure 
you, nothing nasty has been 
perpetrated on Zaphod, but 
because of his job with CCI 
he is getting less and less 
time to keep up to date with 
MUG goings on, and, like 
us, is suffering from an 
overdose of Compunet MUD 
politics (MUD politics is a 
dangerous and sometimes 
fatal disease, contracted 
by some MUGs as a result of 
going commercial). 

Congratulations on Exo- 
dus finally making wizard, 
after many attempts! Poor 
Exodus found himself on 
the wrong side of more than 
a few wizards and witches, 
did I hear anyone say Plod 
and Lotus?), and so found 
himself getting killed off 
rather regularly. He finally 
had to resort to using the 
mode pedestrian name of 
'Seldon' and playing at 
those odd little hours of the 
day when even most MUD 
players are tucked up in 
bed. 

Congratulations also to 
Charesh, who seems to be 



I've played MUD. 



Great laugh, play a game 
and meet new people. 



I'd recommend it. 



incredibly lucky (or have 
friends in high places) 
Nearly all MUD players wish 
for piles of treasure to 
appear by magic before 
them, but a log of the last 
game Charesh played 
shows that's what really 
happened to him! All 
thanks to the Eagle-eyed 
wiz who spotted that one! 
We're told Charesh has 
since made it to wizard on 
his own merits, after his lit- 
tle windfall was deducted 
from his score! 

Mud gossip has it that the 
two hack-and-slayers Smith 
and Jones, who, in true ber- 
serker spirit, appear and 
proceed to kill anything 
that moves, are in fact two 
usually nice and quiet 
wizzes (Fill in the stars 
. . . Z*rc*n and B*l*n*r). 
I dont suppose you can 
blame them too much, as 
the author of MUD said 
"There is only so much 
being nice to people a 
body can stand"! 

The great non-event of 
the year must have been 
the MUD Spectacular, 
organised single-Archedly 
(where WERE all you other 
arches that weekend?) by 
Kate. The idea of a spec- 
tacular is that a large num- 
ber of usually docile MUD 
players get together, get 
locked in the game, and 
beat the living daylights 
out of each other until only 
one survives. Unfortunately 
the Sunday chosen for the 
event was also the week- 
end Cnet chose to test some 
new software, so the system 
wasn't running for long 
enough between crashes 
for anyone to emerge vic- 





Yeah, I'm still MUDding 
now and again. 



Well, "again" is nearly every night. 
I always leel a bit tired now. 
But it's only a game. 
Isn't it? 



torious! Anyway, all thanks 
to the wizzes who came 
along to help (and spec- 
tate) and to the mortals 
who put up with it! 

Onto even stranger go- 
ings on with Lotus the-Arch 
witch ... Since when was 
Lotus an Arch I hear you 
ask? Well, it appears that 
she fluttered her eyelashes 
at the newest Arch-wiz, 
Plod, and managed to 
extract his Arch password 
out of him! Peter (in the 
guise of Brian the Arch- 
Wizard) discovered this 
rather major bending of the 
MUD password security, 
and a great row ensued! 
Most people would (and 
have in the past) gained 
themselves some form of 
retribution for this (Look 
what they did to poor little 
Skweeky the mouse on 
Pr*st*l!), but such is the 
popularity of Lotus with 
Compunet at the moment, 
they'll probably make her 
an Arch for it! 

Bad news for players 
(and especially Wizzes) at 
Essex . . . you're all novices, 
unless you've bothered to 
go and work your way up 
again! The persona file was 
cleared by Richard, and 
everyone was zeroed. 

Speaking of MUD-2, the 
last few months have seen 
assive improvements in the 
game, and especially the 
speed of the game (not 
long ago MUD-2 was so 
slow you could have played 
it by post!) Bug-fixes and 
modifications have now 
rendered the game playa- 
ble, but it is still incom- 
plete, with many nice new 
features over the original 



MUD, but also many very 
basic things missing. How- 
ever MUSE have drastically 
reduced the entry cost to 
the system. It now costs 
only £4.95 to sign up, ver- 
sus £20 before, and is also 
presently charging time at 
half price. It's a shame 
though that all this time has 
made MUSE a bit paranoid 
and 'heavy-handed' on the 
instructions to attack cer- 
tain reviewers on sight (in 
MUD I hasten to add!) for 
writing a bad review about 
the game! Considering the 
small amount of flak MUSE 
have actually been given 
for a product which is, lef s 
face it, over a year late and 
still incomplete, they 
should be glad that many 
of the computer press used 
to play Essex MUD, and still 
public relations front. It's a 
hold it in awe! 

Micronet abandoned the 
idea of running MUD-2 on 
Prestel (due to delays per- 
haps?) and has instead 
plumped for a very interest- 
ing game called Shades. 
More of Shades later, but 
for now, it looks like a good 
MUG, well worth the small 
pittance per hour Micronet 
are talking about charging 
for it! Oh yes, and it 
appeared dead on time 
too! 

I think we have both slung 
enough MUD for one issue. 
Hope to bring you better 
news (and some hints and 
tips on MUG game playing 
styles!) next time! 

Frobozz the wizard has 
just disappeared in a puff 
of Smoke! 

Kate the Arch-Witch has 
just disappeared in a puff 
of perfume! 




Oh yeah, MUD. 
Great, isn't it? 



More like real life than 
real life, huh? 



why should 1 ever want to 
give it up? 



Doesn't affect me in the 
least. 



Well, I can't really afford 
to play it. 

And I can stop playing any 
time I want to. 

But all my friends play it. 



Yeah, I play MUD every night. 

Doesn't mean I'm an addict. 

Have you a fiver I could have? 

I promise to spend it on my first 
meal in ages, not MUD credits. 

Honest! 





54 Commodore Computing November 1986 



THE GAME OF THE GODS 





■ mnH wirrrTi rmmrnv r-nr". "nrrr 
•, inm.ftHut f hi-! k. i Htm ■ 



The fantasy quiz game that 
transforms you and your 
opponents into mighty ancient 
gods. You control four great 
warriors fighting for your honour 
in the Temple of Apollo. 
Demonstrate your superior 
knowledge and they will 
transform into stronger beings — 
but you must master the use of 
'mutations', 'teleports' and 
'challengers' to emerge from the 
battle victorious! 



"Powerplay is exceptionally well 

presented." "The most original of 

all such games currently 

available and unlikely to be 

matched." 

A & B Computing March '86 

"Powerplay is an outstanding 

piece of software. It challenges 

players mentally, but never 

becomes a bore." ". . . here's a 

game brimming over with 

originality." 

Personal Computer World Feb '86 



BBC version shown 

* A Strategic Board Game for 2 to 4 players On CASSETTE ai £9.95 for On DISC at £14.95 for 

* Arcade style 3D graphics action COMMODORE 64 BBC B 

* Rapid access to over 2000 questions on AMSTRAD CPC COMMODORE 64 
four topics AMSTRAD CPC 

* Special facility to create your own 
questions 

Available at good computer stores or direct from Arcana Software Design 




fl Rr ANA ARCANA SOFTWARE DESIGN 

^^^^ AVONDALE WORKSHOPS 

SOFTWARE WOODLAND WAY 

nrcirnT BRISTOL BS1 5 1QH 

JJholLrJM TEL: (0272) 48401 

Please quote this magazine if ordering directly 



.-. 



C16 - PLUS 4 CENTRE 



Books - Games - Budget Games 

Text Aventures - Graphic Adv 

Sport Simulators - Flight Simulators 

Utilities - Music Makers - Paint Prog 

Graphic Designers - Data Bases 

Spread Sheets - Word Processors 

Business Progs - Joysticks 

Ram Packs - Dust Covers - Leads 

Interfaces 
In fact anything to do with 

C16 or Plus 4. 

Send S.A.E. for a detail leaflet. 



C16/Plus 4 Centre, ANCO Marketing Ltd, 

4, West Gate House, Spital Street, 

Dartford, Kent. DAI 2EH. Tel: 0322 - 92513/92518 

24 Hour hot line: 0322/522631 




The 
exciting 

NEW „ 
RELEASE 

from 

NGLOSOFT 

WHAT THE PRESS SAID 

"This is one of the most original games to emerge this 
year . . high quality gameplay makes thisfully deserve a 
MEGA. Great value! Buy it now!' ' 

C.C.I. Sept. '86 

"The action can be fast and furious or cool and 
calculated, the choice is yours! . . . Droid is a highly 
playable game with plenty of mental challenge as well as 
arcade action. ' ' 

COMMODORE USER SEPT. '86 

AVAILABLE NOW FROM YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR SEND 
CHEQUE/P.O. TO ANGLOSOFT, P.O. BOX 60, COVENTRY 
(PRICES INCLUDE P&P). 

£7 . 9 5 Cassette £9 . 9 5 Disk 




Streets Olympics 

Street Olypmics is , according to 
Mastertronic, 'an addictive sports 
simulation that needs great stamina 
and strength' so you can beat the 
records. 

All this for one ninety-nine, sounds 
like a real steal! It couldnt be further 
from the truth. This must be the worst 
Mastertronic game I have ever seen 
for the C16, (Hey that rhymes!) I'm 
surprised that they had the guts to 
release it. And according to the 
charts its selling well. Some people 
will buy on names alone. 



The events you take part in are: the 
two hundred metre sprint, (run a little 
distance) eight hundred metre job, 
(run a long distance) a long dis- 
tance run combined with Jumping 
over a series of walls, and a run com- 
bined with throwing a brick (throw- 
ing bricks is vandalism a street sport. 
Well yes I suppose it is, Ed). 



In the running events, when you 
reach about a third of your possible 
speed you find you cant go any fas- 
ter. Frustrating isnt the word for this 
but the one that is, is unprintable! 
The throwing event is Just as stupid, 
when you let go the brick you arent 
presented with the brick flying into 
the air but a silly little angle chart 
with a line depicting the angle at 
which you think should throw the 
brick. 

There are two game variations A 
and B and keyboard options as well. 
The problem is when you want to 
complete in all events with the joys- 
tick, as soon as you start running the 
game stops. Words fail me, how 
ould Mastertronic not notice this 
when they tested the game? What 
gets me is that this game could have 
been good. 





The graphics are quite good and 
the sound is, to say the least, loud. It 
is a very playable game but could 
get boring rather quickly. It is though, 
a budget game well worth what yqu 
pay for, if you like shoot 'em ups. 



Auriga 



Players are yet another budget range 
company. With more and more low 
price quality games, things are 
looking up for the buying public 
who usually had to fork out eight 
quid or more. 

This time you are a Star Fighter 
and you have to shoot sixteen waves 
of enemies. To do this you must 
travel to sixteen systems. If you 
complete this mission you will 
become a fighter pilot and get thrown 
into more fighting! 

As you have most probably 
guessed this is lust' another space 
invaders game with a jazzed up 



storyline. It also has a nifty (nifty? I 
havent heard anyone use that word 
for ages, Ed.) picture on the inlay 
card that would make a great poster 
(hint, hint). 

Playing the game is a hectic affair 
Involving lots of shooting and aim- 
ing - let one ship get down too far 
and you're done for. They'll either 
drop quick little shots at you or 
crash Into y ou. When you get killed 
your ship breaks into two and rushes 
along the bottom of the screen from 
side to side freiuddly then puts itself 
together again, ready to fight once 
more. 




56 Commodore Computing November 1 986 






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• Full 3D action - 1 player 
or 2 player option. Lightning 
moves - Six Spectacular 
Backdrops. 

• See the cuts and the 
bruises on the faces of the 
boxers, as they kick and 
punch in this gruelling 
contest. 



• Enhanced 128 versions for 
that extra smooth animation 
and sound effects. 



CBM 128 
Disc only 



CBM 64/128 
(cass) 



(disc) 



WE 



£11.95 
£10-95 



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ANCO SOFTWARE, 4 WEST GATE HOUSE, SPITAL STREET, DARTFORD, KENT DA1 2EH. Telephone: 0322 92513/92518 
Mail Order: Payment by Cheque, P.O., Visa or Access. 24 Hour Credit Card Service: 0322 522631 . 




Galaxibirds — Firebird 

Galaxibirds is a cross between Gal- 
axians and Phoenix. Your task is, as 
per normal, to defend earth. You 
have your little spaceship and an 
unlimited supply of bullets to help 
you. 

The first time I played Galaxibirds 
I didn't like it. I was screaming at it to 
slow down. How many games do you 



know of that are too fast? Here's a tip 
for Quickshot 2 users. Dont use auto- 
fire as this seems to make life harder. 
As soon as I turned autofire off I got 
further. Waves of various aliens, that 
you must destroy to move on, des- 
cend from the sky. It became really 
fun. 

It's a nice try on the old theme of 
this kind of shoot 'em up game, and 
though at first very frustrating, it is 
also suprisingly addictive. The gra- 



phics are large and colourful and 
although the sound is quite primitive 
it works to good effect. It is very good 
value for money. 





Here's another CI 6 release from the 
little known company, Probe Soft- 
ware. 

You control Dirty Den (why Dirty I 
don't know), who must rescue his 
princess from the clutches of the 
nasty old wizard', Nikita who has 
kidnapped, and hidden her within 
the maze of his castle grounds. 

You, the valiant, and honourable 
Den, have to brave the maze with its 
creatures and monsters, to get to her 
chamber and finally free her. How- 
ever, being a bit of a snob, the prin- 
cess doesn't want to be rescued 
unless you bring her lots of choco- 
lates, so quite apart from having to 
avoid being killed by some ghoul, 
you have to hazard your life going 
around picking up chocolates! I cer- 
tainly wouldn't bother with a prin- 



cess like that ... But still some people 
I know might do anythingXo get close 
to the aristos. 

With only 1 2k to write the program 
in, it is very difficult to produce stun- 
ning graphics, especially as we are 
talking about a CI 6, and not a 64 
(which many reviewers seem to for- 
get . . .). However, the graphics, 
mostly the software sprites, could 
have been improved I think, and a 
few more sound effects added. The 
game is very, very simple, and is the 
sort of thing that was appearing on 
the 64 when it was first launched. It 
does have a certain appeal if you 
like quick, easy to play/get into 
games, but otherwise loses its clutch 
on you after playing for a while. 




58 Commodore Computing November 1986 



lirU.SnH Oorura 

COMMODORE SOFTWARE SPECIALISTS 



C128 BASIC Compiler 

DBASE II 

Micro Clerk [Accounts Package) 

New Paperclip (WP) 

Superbsse 128 

Superscript 128 

Swift Spreadsheet 128 

Viza Write Classic 128 


NEW 

NEW 

Special 
NEW 


47.00 d 
110.00 d 
89.50 d 
42.50 d 
87.50 d 
67.50 d 
22.50 d 
87.50 d 


Alter Ego (Male or Female! 

Alternate Reality Pt 1 

Ballyhoo by Infocom 

Borrowed Time 

Hitch-Hiker's Guide to the Galaxv 

Jewels of Darkness* 

Lord of the Rings' 

Mandragore* 

Murder on the Mississippi 

Price of Magick 

Questprobe" (Fantastic Four Adv. 

Sorcerer by Infocom 

Spellbreaker by Infocom 

Suspect by Infocom 

Ultima III 

Ultima VI 

Zark 1. II or 111 


NEW 
NEW 
NEW 

NEW 

NEW 
NEW 
NEW 
NEW 

NEW 

Special 
NEW 


22.50 d 
18.00 d 
27.50 d 
13.75 d 
24.50 d 
12.75 t 
13.75 t 
12.75 t 
12.95 d 
8.501 
8.50 t 
22.50 d 
27.50 d 
27.50 d 
15.00 d 


first Base 64 (Database) 

First Word 64 (Word Processor! 

Home Accounts 

Office Mate" [Database & WP) 

Swift Spreadsheet 64 


Special 


32.50 d 
32.50 d 
15.00 d 
12.00 \ 
22.50 d 


Donald uuck's Playground" [4-9yrsJ 
French Mistress A and B (each) 
German Master A and B [each) 
Introduction to BASIC Part 1* 
Hermit's Story Maker" (4-9yrs) 
Up and Add 'em {3-7yrs) 


Special 


8.50 t 
7.95 t 
7.951 
3.95 t 
8.50t 
8.75 t 


18,00 d 
10.75 d 


Colossus Chess 4.0* 
Ghosts and Goblins' 

Infiltrator 

Knight Games" 

Leader Board [Golf)' 

PS1 5 Trading Company* 

Scrabble* 

Spindizzy* 

Tau Ceti" 


NEW 

NEW 
NEW 
NEW 

NEW 
NEW 


8.50 t 
8.50 t 
12.95 d 


MTIIuilnWd.'mil^HH 




12.75 t 
12.75 t 
22.00 t 
12.75 t 
17.50 t 
19.95 d 
15.95 d 
36.00 d 


8.50 t 
8.50 t 
11.00 t 
8.50 t 
8.50 t 


Art Studio* 

CAD 64' (Computer Aided Design) 
Graphic Adventure Creator' 
Jetpack BASIC Compiler* 
LASER Basic* 


NEW 
NEW 

Special 


LOGO 

Rainbird Music System — 8asic 

Rainbird Music System — Advanced 


"iH" IW— i 

Home Office (Database & WP) 

Hyperforce 

Introduction to Basic Pt 1 

Leapin' Louie 

Paintbox (Drawing Utility) 

Reach for the Sky 

Steve Davis Snooker 

Viduules (Jigsaw qame) 

Winter Events 

Yie Ar Kung Fu 


9.75 t 

NEW 6.50 1 

Special 13.00 1 

NEW 6.50 1 

S.OOt 

6.50 t 

7.50 t 

Special 9.50 c 

NEW 6.95 t 

NEW 7.00 1 


Aero Jet* 
Battle of Britain" 
Crusade in Europe' 
Flight Deck" 
Germany 1985" 
Knights of the Desert" 
Silent Service" 
Solo Flight Plus" 


NEW 8.50 1 

8.50 t 

NEW 12,75 1 

NEW 8.50 1 

NEW 8.50 1 

NEW 8.50 1 

8.50 t 

NEW 8.50 1 

8.50 t 

10.75 t 

4T0RS AT LOW 

Simulator Otic only t* 

"1 llwiihout douBi trw 
DISCS iiai etscotipat 


Tigers in the Snow' 

747 Flight Simulator" (Doc Soft) 

SPECIAL - SUSLOGIC FUGHT SIMUL 
PRICES. 

JET m«bflliantr>ewF16/F18F>ghte 

FLIGHT SIMULATO 

Ej.Iri SCENEB 


ACE (Flight Simulator) 

Mercemary 

Saboteur 

tjesJ Fdgnt SimuUior on Commodore Cass 
bie —m ocirt jt i mo i-bii EisiO eicn. 


8.75 1 
NEW 8.50 1 
NEW 7.50 1 

£34 Oise £** 



\ - cassette tape d = diskette c ■ ROM cartridge * - Disc version available 

HUNDREDS MORE TITLES AVAILABLE - ALL AT DISCOUNT PRICES 

Please send siamp for our complete list (state which computer). 

Please include 50p forPosI and Packing for all orders less [han£20. Outside UK please include £1 plus75p 
for each additional item on all orders. Send Cheque. Eurocheque, Sterling money order or UK Postal Order 
with order to: 

UK SOFT CENTRE LTD (CCI) 
POBOX3S TELEPHONE 

DUNSTABLE BEDS LU6 2NP DUNSTABLE (0582) 607929 



Ahoy there you scurvy eyed 

scrawny sons of sea dogs.. 

you'll soon get a chance to 

hoist that spinnaker and 

challenge those lager 

swilling Aussie dingos for 

the greatest sailing 

trophy of all... 



THE AMERICA'S CUP 







catch you with its web of 
intrigue and payability. 

Computer & Video Games 



An arcade adventure with 100 screens featuring some of the 
finest graphics ever seen. 

You must guide Arac to assemble his army of animal slaves which 
together with the dreaded Arachnidroid will enable him to 
penetrate the fortified citadel and deactivate the three reactors. 

You will need all your strategy and arcade skills to get you through 
this one! 

£9.95 for the Commodore 64 



sssssF FOOTBALL MANAGER 



I Still in the chartsafter four years, Britain's most popular 
J Football Management game ever. Now available on 
I Amstrad at £8.95 • Atari at £9.95 • BBC at £8.95 ■ 
|Commodore64at£8.95C16/Plus4at£6.95- 
■Electron at £8.95 

• Spectrum at £8.95 • VIC 20 plus 16K 

at £7.95 ZX81 at £7.95 




► 



T-SHIRTS 



Ityou play Addictive games you must 
want one of these (the shirt!!). Small/ 
Medium/Large or XL -£4-50 each 



PAYMENTS 



Addictive products can be bought from all 
good software stockists but in case of difficulty 
may be obtained direct from us by mail order at 
the prices shown (UK P& P included but 
overseas customers must add £1.50). 

□ Access orders can be telephoned through on 
/& (0202) 296404.. 




<J**M I 



Addictive Games Ltd 
10 Albert Road - Bournemouth 
Dorset BH1 1BZ • Tel: 0202-296404 



ifeatuie/ 



Ultima IV 

the Quest for 
Self Control! 



Ultima ... the very word sent shivers up 
and down the spine. It is an adventure 
series of mammoth size and reputation. 
Usually when I get a new adventure 
game, the first thing on the agenda is to 
step outside and bump off the charac- 
ters in the immediate vicinity. Taking 
this approach in Ultima IV may gain you 
lots of treasure, but will get you nowhere 
in the game. 

Ultima IV — The Quest of the Avatar is 
an impressive game. It comes on four 
sides of disks complete with map, player 
card and two booklets — one about the 
land of Britannia, and one about spells. 
The player disk is not copy protected, so 
you can copy it and run several alterna- 
tive playfield realities concurrently. 

On starting you are lead to a gypsy 
who determines your character type by 
asking you questions. I always ended up 
as a bard — I'm nearly tone deaf — until I 
had learnt enough of the game to know 
which answers would get the character I 
wanted! 

Your character is then teleported to 
the land of Britannia. Your first task is to 
persuade others to join your party! You 
will eventually have eight people in your 
party — one of each character type — 
mage, bard, fighter, druid, tinker, 
paladin, ranger, and shepherd. Each 
type has its own innate virtue. Mages, 
for instance have the virtue of honesty. If 
you have been dishonest, and there is 
not shortage of opportunity to be dis- 
honest, you will be unable to persuade a 
mage to join your party. You have to go 
away and make up for your dishonesty. 

Your initial aim is to become an avatar 
— one who has been enlightened in all 
the eight virtues. After about 50 hours 
playing time I finally made it — only to 
discover that I was barely a third of the 
way through the game! Arrgghh! Now 
all I had to do was collect the eight 
stones, the skull, the wheel, the bell, the 



book and the candle, the three part key, 
find out the three syllables of the word of 
passage, and the one true axiom . . . 

Ultima IV, like its predecessor III, 
takes a deal of time to complete. It is, 
however, a considerable improvement 
over Ultima III in several fields. In par- 
ticular Lord British seems to have elimi- 
nated the boredom that set in a you col- 
lected cash to maximise your characters' 
attributes. The main screen display is 
similar to Ultima III — a window show- 
ing the status of your party, an input 
window, anda large window showing 
the action. The action window is con- 
structed by modifying the C64 character 
set — truly awful! Somebody please tell 
Lord British that you are allowed to use 
the hi-res graphics and sprites in adven- 
ture as well as arcade games! 

One of the key features of the game is 
talking to other characters — indeed it is 
almost impossible to get anywhere in 
the game without talking to characters. 
Ofte you will be told to ask someone else 
for information. You then have to go 
back to that person, because when you 
spoke last you didn't ask the right ques- 
tion! To get Nightshade (an essential 
ingredient of the KILL spell), for 
instance, you have to talk to five differ- 
ent people. People often ask you a ques- 
tion. Answer it honestly, they will 
remember what you said next time they 
meet you! 

The monsters are a pretty impressive 
lot — and include hostile vegetables 
(reapers). There are 33 different types, 
and you may be attacked by parties 
which are composed of different types. 
The book about Britannia tells you 
which ones are evil. This is important — 
if you wantonly attack non-evil beasts 
(as opposed to fighting back when they 
attack you) it's bad karma, and the 
paladin will refuse to join you because 
you are not honourable. 



When combat occurs the main win- 
dow changes to depict the field of battle 
with your characters and the opposition 
shown individually. There is a wide 
variety of different battlefields, which 
makes strategy as well as brute force 
necessary. My advice is to arm your 
characters with missile weapons and 
dispose of the enemy before they get to 
you! 

The dungeons are depicted as a 3-D 
maze. The opposition can be seen 
approaching (it gets bigger as it gets 
nearer!) until battle is joined. In dun- 
geons the battle screen is a plan view of 
the room in which the battle takes place 
— complete with exits in case you've 
bitten off more than you can chew! Flee 
too often and the fighter will refuse to 
join you (Thou art truly a wimp', he 
announced. Sigh . . .). 

In spite of the crude graphics, though, 
the game is both addictive and very 
enjoyable. Many of the faults of previous 
games have been eliminated, but the 
problem of slow disk loading remains, 
courtesy of the 1541 diskdrive. It is diffi- 
cult to see how this could be resolved 
given the memory limitations. Fortu- 
nately, long disk accesses happen only 
when you enter dungeons, towns and 
castles. 

If you want to cheat at the game there 
is a program on Compunet (GOTO 
MARK II) which lets you edit your char- 
acters up to max points and kit. It won't 
do you much good though — you still 
have to go and talk to people! The best 
advice I can give budding avatars is: 

1 ) Note down the name of everyone you 
meet, and where you met them. This 
way you will be able to find them again! 

2) Get hold of a sextant as soon as pos- 
sible (ask a sailor if you can't find one). 
This will let you note the location of 
important places. 



60 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



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Fighting Words 




There are not many real 
stars in the computer 
world, but among them 
undoubtably glitters Jeff 
Minter, creator of innum- 
erable smash-hit games 
We've given Jeff the free- 
dom to say what he wants 
(libel laws permitting!) 
You may not always 
agree with what he says, 
but he's certainly worth lis- 
tening to. CCI won't 
always agree with what he 
says either, but we promise 
to print it anyway! 

Back once again after having been on 
me hols to Corfu (very sunny ta very 
much). During the intervening time I 
have finished my new C64 game Iridis 
Alpha, with which I am well pleased; and 
been to the PCW show and seen a few 
interesting things of which more later. 

Firstly, for anyone who bought Iridis 
and thought the instructions were a bit 
sparse, well yes they were, because 
somewhat half the instructions got lost 
before printing. In brief, the missing bits 
explained the following: In the Bonus 
phase the objective is to move up the 
course to the top as fast as possible 
avoiding and shooting the eyeballs; in 
the Pause mode (press F1 to enter) they 
keys N and M deflect the beam, you aim 
for the target before the timer runs out. 
To access DNA press *. 

While I was at the PCW show I had my 
first look at the new Commodore 64, the 
64C. What Commodore have done is 
taken the old C64 (you know, the one 
with the crummy Basic, slow disk drive 
and the tape system so slow that without 
a turbo loader you'd be better off leaving 
the tape near the computer and waiting 
for the data to load by osmosis) and 
given it a new case, and . . . that's all. Oh, 
and they increased the price. No new 
Basic, no built-in- tape turbos or disk 
speedups; just your old clonky '64 in a 
Starship Enterprise case. Bit of an own- 
goal by Commodore I reckon. 

If they really wanted a decent suc- 
cesor, they should at least have had an 
enhanced BASIC with tape and disk 
turbos, maybe leaving the old BASIC in 
there somehwere for compatibility's 
sake. Oh, you get something called 
GEOS but that's just a shell around the 
same old stuff, it's slow, useless for 
copying disks if you only got one drive, 
and you need to boot it off disk in the 
first place, it's not ROMmed. I'd have 



Minter speaks out 

liked to see a VIC-3 chip developed, too, 
similar to VIC-2 but with the colour 
capabilities of the C16/Plus 4 machines, 
but I suppose that really is asking too 
much. So you get your clonky '64 in the 
Starship Enterprise case and that's it. 

Yes, and while I'm getting depressed 
about Commodore getting it wrong, I 
see that the Amiga hasn't dropped in 
price at all. Still as expensive as it ever 
ws . . . and Atari are catching up: at the 
Show I found out that ST owners can 
expect to be buying Blitter chips for 
their machines in a few weeks' time. The 
Blitter is that part of the Amiga that gives 
its graphics such speed. If you have an 
Atari you can bolt on Amiga-type speed 
for the price of a couple of good games. 
Mind you, I have heard the odd 
rumour that Commodore may be going 
to offer a repackaged Amiga for 5-600 
odd. If they do that then they will earn 
my undying loyalty for every. If they do 
that I shall have a party. If they do that, 
maybe they won't go bust. Then, every- 
one can play Marble Madness. 

Marble Madness on the Amiga is an 
experience everyone should have at 
least six times a day. The graphics are 
identical to the arcade version, although 
the animation gets a little jerky in the 
two-player mode when there's a lot 
happening onscreen, probably by dint 
of the fact that the program's written in 
90 percent C. Nonetheless, the game 
can't be knocked, because it is so damn 
near arcade perfect to play. Shame that 
there was no hiscore table or last score 
display though. But still brilliant and 
compulsory purchase for all Amiga 
owners. Both of them. 

Anyway, why do you want an Amiga? 
Are you going to go in there and use all 
that wonderful technology yourself, or 
are you just drooling at the thought of all 
the brilliant games you could get to play 
on it? After all, the Amiga was designed 
as a game system but that changed with 
the death of the dedicated game 
machines and the birth of the Age of the 
Micro . . . 

Well I've got news for you . . . the 
Return of the Game Systems is about to 
happen, and it'll blow your brains out 
and your joysticks up. How about a 
system for playing games that offers the 
best games potential of any micro this 
side of the Amiga, with 256 colours, 256 
(count 'em) sprites, the most amazing 
hardware smooth scroll you ever clapped 
eyes on, and arcade conversions just 
like the originals? Sounds good, huh? 
But must be expensive, ok? 

Such a system is the new Sega game 
machine, and you get all that power for 
just eighty quid. Nintendo got one 
coming out soon, too. The game carts 
are about the same price as disk 
software is now, and they're instant, and 



permanent. And they can't be pirated 
(which is good news for us software 
developers, and for you took, 'coz you 
don't have to worry about any stupid 
security codes or dongles and suchlike). 

I'm not implying that we all abandon 
our trusty Commodores and just go 
back to joystick twitching full-time on a 
dedicated system; of course not. We all 
use our computers for other things than 
games (don't we?) and the chances are 
that we'll want to have micros for 
programming, wordprocessing, and 
messing about with music and graphics 
and whatever else we're into; but we all 
love playing arcade games, and rather 
than force our poor Commodore to 
perform unnatural acts with more than 8 
sprites at once in order to make it run an 
arcade game, why not use a system that 
was designed to do such stuff ten times 
better than the C64 ever could? Espe- 
cially if the thing only costs eighty quid. 

I reckon we maybe in for a bit of a split 
in the software field. Arcade game wri- 
ters would do better programming for 
the game systems, whereas creative 
stuff like music programs and Adven- 
ture Construction Kits and Colourspace 
are obviously more suited to a proper 
micro. Anyway, we shall have to wait 
and see. I reckon that a lot of the sales of 
Commodores and Spectrums and a lot 
of low-end micros are just from people 
wanting a system to play games on, and 
with the advent of these new cheap 
game supersystems the 8-bit low-end 
market will quietly die and those who 
are really into computers to a stage 
beyond gameplaying, the enthusiasts 
and programmers, will move on up to 
mid-range 16-bit systems like the Atari 
ST and the (please God let the rumours 
of a cheap version be true) Amiga. 

Me, I intend to write stuff for both 
halves of the new market. I'm looking 
forward to doing some games for the 
new game systems (like REALLY look- 
ing forward . . . think of all those 
SPRITES . . . more moveable objects 
than the human mind can comfortably 
comprehend . . . think of the number of 
bullets you could have! the aliens! the 
EXPLOSIONS!!!) but I'm still going to be 
using proper micros for stuff like Colour- 
space (which needs special controllers 
like mice and graphix tablets, huge bit- 
maps, lots of keyboard commands and a 
certain amount of enthusiasm from the 
operator). 

Of course, I may be totally wrong, and 
maybe the game systems will flop. Time 
and Boots' till receipts will tell. Wait till 
you've seen these upstart game systems 
before you block up the Commodore's 
joystick ports and flog your illicit disk 
collection of six million cracked chart- 
toppers . . . 

Right, you've had your lot for this 
month. I'm off to play Astro Warrior on 
me Sega. 



62 Commodore Computing November 1986 



1 1 ■ h „ 

always a step ahead |* 






^S5 



software 



booklets 

stops 

lutihe 



1a»o w 



1 digta/ a 






, *">r>owt 




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Douser has ^^"S^Jll. *Hf? 

Because it is «*? „*£ a unique method 
onthematket DouW'use» . 

,!,» copies »' W" ™ , MrtwOT »"<1 

less of speed. It consists » M™» as 

DISC DISECTOR 
V5.0 

Now the FIFTH generation of the country's leading disc 
back-up/utility package is available. This latest version includes 
many more "PARAMETERS" to handle the latest hlahlv 
protected discs. * ' 

EVESHAM 3 MINUTE NIBBLER" is the latest version of the 

infamous "Evesham Nibbler" now boasting even more power 
and speed. Will now copy even the most highly 
protected discs In 3-4 minutes. Handles the latest types of disc 
protection completely automatically. This often involves the 
use of the "PARAMETER COPIER" which adds the vital secret 
code that the highly protected programs check for (This is the 
important difference that makes this the best). At the time of going 
to press this program copied virtually every disc program 
available for testing Including the latest In games and 
business software. 

"DUAl DRIVE NIBBLER" allows the use of two drives to make 
even faster back-ups. Incorporates device number chanqe 
software so no hardware mods necessary. 

"NOVA TRANSFER" will transfer to disc the latest Nova Load 
programs including multl part loaders. A very useful utility that 
also includes routines to transfer "Summer Games II" and "Beach- 
Head II" to disc. 

"DISCO" will transfer standard speed load software to disc. 
'TRANS QD" allows you to save a fast load system to your own 
discs. ' 

"DOUBLE BACK UP" is a very fast two drive back up. 
As well as these important newcomers all the old favourite utilities 
which have helped earn "Disector" such a large following are 
included. These include Menu Maker (selective). Fast 
Format, Unscratch, Disc Monitor, Disc Orderly, Fast File 
Copy, Index, etc., etc. 

The whole package is menu driven and has its own fast boot system 
built in for your convenience. Pays for itself the first day you receive it 

ONLY £29.95 
Customers with earlier versions may return them along with 

a payment of £9.95 to receive V5.0 
Programs are CBM 128 and 1570/71 compatible In '64 mode. 

m 



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MK.III 

VERSION 



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owr-ej,.,. 




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After enjoying considerable 
success since Its release we 
have now made some Improve- 
ments to "OUICKDISC+" to 
maintain Its position as the 
best value In the disc "speed 
up/utility cartridges. 
Fast LOAD (now 5-7 times 
normal speed|. Works with 
majority of protected software. Can 
be switched in and out from the 
keyboard. 

Fast SAVE at 7 times normal 
speed. 

Fast Format takes just 20 seconds. 
Fast Backup copies an entire disc in 
four minutes (not protected 
software). 

Very Fast File Copier for selective 
file copying at HIGH speed. Now 
handles files up to 248 blocks long. 
Improved DOS commands |DOS 
5 I ) makes for easy use of the disc 
drive, eg. S(RETURN) will LOAD and 
display a directory without over- 
writing BASIC. SHIFT RUN/STOP will 
LOAD "0:*".8,1 etc. Very, very 
useful. 

Incorporates Centr ° n '" 

printer software (user port] with 
CBM graphics capability [requires 
user port Centronics cable|. 
A RESET switch is fitted. (We have 
found this to be "unstoppable ". it 
even preserves the tape buffer).. 
NO MEMORY IS USED by this car 
tridge, it is totally "transparent" and 
uses special switching techniques. 
"128" and 1570 compatible in 
'64 mode. 

PLUS MANY MORE USEFUL 
FEATURES TO MAKE YOUR 
1541 FAR MORE FRIENDLY TO 
OPERATE. 

ONLY £19.95 

When reviewing "Quickdisc+^ 
Commodore Horizons said: "A 
MUST FOR EVERY 1541 
OWNER". 

NOW EVEN FASTER 



THE BEST IN 

BACKUP METHODS 

IS NOW EVEN BETTER 

NOW HANDLES PROGRAMS THAT LOAn SUBSEQUENT 

PARTS 
Freeie Frame MKII" must have been the worlds most powerful 

and most successful backup product. The success cT£e£S' 
pawned several imitators but they are pale imitations of, Xhat we are 

Now the "MKIII" version has moved "Freeze Frame" well ahead of the 
opposition . As well as its unfai.ing skill in handling every memo™ 
"'f P~g«m available for testing up to 1st July 1986 it wTnow 

^uem^rt," diSC * e "" "** of "<>*"»> — '«- 
FEATURES 



• TAPE TO DISC 

• DISC TO DISC 

• COMPLETELYSELF CONTAINED, 
NO EXTRA SOFTWARE NEEDED 

• FILES COMPRESSED FOR ECONOMY 
OF STORAGE SPACE 

• I28/128DCOMPATIBLEIN 
64 MODE 



• TAPE TO TAPE 

• DISCTOTAPE 

• RELOAD INDEPENDENT OFTHE 
CARTRIDGE 

• NOWHANDIESPROGRAMSTHAT 
LOAD EXTRA PARTS 

• PROGRAMS RESTART FROM THE 

POINT BUTTON IS PRESSED 

OPERATING "FREEZE FRAME" 

Freeze Frame" is simplicity Itself to use. It is cartridge based so is simolv 
plugged into the cartridge port. When the computer is switched or a 
message ,s displayed, pressing "RETURN" will clear the computer back to 

cdoT. , Start UP SCreen ' SoftWare can now be ,oa *d from tape or disc 
completely as normal. The latest version of "Freeze Frame" wHI to the 
bes of our knowledge, allow ANY software to load and run normaHy 
(unlike competitive products). "wmwny 

™-. e . Z |t^r'„ Can be br ° U9ht int0 °P erati °n « any convenient point by 
pressing the button on it. You can then do one of three things- 

1. Pressing D will save a working version of the program In 
memory to a formatted disc. This version will Included" 
auto booting very high speed reload (many program" 
reload In less than 30 sees). * programs 

2. Pressing S" will save to disc with a standard reload speed 
that can be used by non 1541/70/71 drives U.S. speT 
machines etc., but perhaps more Importantly by most fast 

mssm a i d syi,ems - use Do, p n,n d ° s " '"•«" 

anything In less than 10 sees. (Also suitable for U.S. spec 

machines.) r 

3. Pressing T will save a working version of the program In 

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^ZfnZZSill SAVED WITH ""WW «came caw 

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Owners of earlier versions can return them 
and upgrade for £14.95. 

fEFFlXZEfUZS* ' S/W ■""■"■IK POWERFUL PRODUCT 

AND IS STRICTLY FOR PERSONAL USE. DONT COMPAm ■ rr^HSL 

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This package incorporates new drive stops for two 1541s that will end for good the 

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discs, availablefrom us atthe 






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Wo DOLPHIN DOS the difference is SMGG^yy, 

4/- 



Like everyone that has had the pleasure of seeing this system in 
operation you will be amazed by both the speed and ease of 
use. It is compatible with the majority of commercial software, 
speeding up both the program loading and SEQ/REL files. 
Fitting requires the insertion of two sub assembly boards, one 
in the 154! and one in the '64/' 128. This does not normally 
entail soldering, although a small amount will be necessary 
with some machines. 



ONLY £69.95 

If you require further information please send SAE for fact sheet. 
Operates with the CBM 64 or 128 in 64 mode with 1 541 disc drive. 



THE FEATURES 

25x FASTER LOADING (PROGRAM FILES) 
1 2x FASTER SAVING (PROGRAM FILES) 
1 Ox FASTER LOADING (SEQUENTIAL FILES) 
8x FASTER SAVING (SEQUENTIAL FILES) 
3x FASTER LOAD AND SAVE (RELATIVE) 
(These figures do not allow for searching) 
Easy DOS commands from function keys. 
Fast formats 40 tracks giving 749 blocks free. 
Centronics driver software inbuilt. 

Machine code monitor. 
Can be switched out if necessary. 



■■ " -~ — ~ " " " " " " " " " V " ^' " " " " " " " ^ "^ Yl 11 Y| Yt_ll-Jl_Jl 

SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. ALL ORDERS DESPATCHED THE WORKING DAY AFTER RECEIPT 






EVESHAM MICROS MICRO CENTRE 



All prices Include P&P and VAT. Send cheque. Postal 
Order or Credit Card No. Credit Card orders accepted 
by phone. Callers welcome. Wide range of goods 
stocked. Trade enquiries welcome. European orders 
send price as advertised. Outside Europe £2.00 for 
airmail. Mail order to Evesham please. 

In Australia contact: MICRO ACCESSORIES of S.A., 39b Anderson Walk, Smithfield. South Australia 5114. Tel: (081 254 6284 



BRIDGE STREET, EVESHAM, 
WORCS. WR11 4RY. 
Tel: 0386 41989 



. 756 PERSHORE ROAD, 

COTTERIDGE, BIRMINGHAM. 

Tel: 021-458 4564 



The fiA Software Centre 

\J 1 PRINCETON STREET. LONDON WC1 R 4AL - TEL: 01 -430 0954 



The specialist centre for Commodore 64, 128 and Amiga 

Selected items from stock (disk): 



Amiga 

EA De Luxe Paint £90.00 

De Luxer Paint Art & Utility £34.00 

De Luxe Print with Data Disk £90.00 

De Luxe Video Constr. Set £90.00 

Instant Music £49-00 

Financial Cookbook £59.00 

Archon £39.00 

One on one £39.00 

Golden Oldies £39.00 

Seven Cities of Gold £39.00 

Skyfox £39-00 

Maxidesk £69-00 

Maxiplan £139.00 

Maxicomm £54.00 

Marble Madness £39.00 

Arctic Fox £39.00 

Access Leaderboard £44.00 

Epyx Rogue £39.00 

Temple Trilogy £39.00 

Mindscape Brataccus £49.00 

Halley Project £49.00 

Racter £44.00 

Keyboard Cadet £39.00 

Activision Hacker £24.00 

Mindshadow £24.00 

Music Studio £34.00 

Classic Image Hex £35.00 

Unicorn Diablo £29.00 

Microsystems Scribble Word Processor £90.00 

Analyse Spreadsheet £110.00 

Rainbird Pawn £24.00 

Aegis Images £69.00 

Animator £115.00 

Draw £165.00 

Lattice Utility £99.00 

CCompiler £125.00 

Metacomco MCC Pascal £85.00 

Haba MiAmiga File (database) £90.00 

Insight Financial Time Machine £49.00 

Kuma K-Seka 68000 Assembler £75.00 

Other Valley Monkey Business £29.00 

Delta Patrol £39.00 

Infocom Trinity £39.00 

VIP VIP Professional £175.00 



Commodore 128 

Wordwriter 128 £57.50 

Data Manager 128 £57.50 

Swiftcalc128 £57.50 

Partner 128 (cartridge) £60.00 

Personal Finance £60.00 

Superscript 128 £69.00 

Superbase128 £65.00 

Popular Accounts £90.00 

Invoicing £69.00 

Payroll £69.00 

Supercombo £190.00 

Studio Payroll 128 £44.00 

Sys Soft Oxford Pascal 128 £44.00 

Petspeed128 £44.00 

Bl Paperclip £44.00 

Audiogenic Microswift Spreadsheet £24.00 

Infocom Trinity £39.00 



Timeworks 



Micropro 
Precision 
Sage 



Baudville 
Berkeley 
Broderbund 



CSM 

DTL 

Hesware 

Micropro 

Practicore 

Precision 

Springboard 

Supersoft 

SystemSoft 

Timeworks 

Xetec 



Commodore 64 

Blazing Paddles .£59.00 

Geos £59.00 

The Printshop £39.00 

The Printshop Companion £35.00 

The Music Shop £49.00 

1541 Drive Alignment £49.00 

Jetpack Compiler £35.00 

Forth (cartridge) £49.00 

Superscript 64 £49.00 

Practical II £35.00 

Superbase 64 £45.00 

Superbase Starter £30.00 

Newsroom £59.00 

Mikro Assembler (cartridge) £55.00 

Oxford Pascal £34.00 

Wordwriter 64 £60.00 

Fontmaster II Wordprocessor £69.00 



All prices include VAT. Add £1.00 forp&p 

Credit cards (Visa/Access) telephone orders accepted 

Hours: 10.00 am/6.00 pm (incl Saturdays) 



CP/M + the 128 Part II 



System cold start 



The cold start procedure is executed 
immediately after the computer is turned 
on, or the Reset button pressed. The 
cold start brings CP/M into memory and 
gives it control of theC128's resources. 
This is a four stage process. The first 
three stages are performed with BankO 
in context. 

The C128 reset routine is situated in 
the Z80 ROM. The Z80 is put in control 
when the system is reset or switched on. 
The Z80 first checks for a C64 cartridge. 
If no cartridge is present and the CBM 
key is not pressed (forces C64 mode), 
then control is passed to the 8502 and 
the system attempts to boot from the 
disk drive with address 8. If such a disk 
drive is connected and switched on, the 
BOOT sector, Track 1 Sector 0, is read 
into memory and checked for the Boot 
code. Assuming that this occurs, and 
that the CP/M system disk is in the drive, 
then control is passed to the Cold Boot 
Loader which was loaded in from the 
boot sector. This is the first stage of the 
process. 

The Cold Boot Loader enables the 
Z80 processor and passes control to the 
CP/M Loader routine, CPMLDR, in the 
Z80 ROM. This completes the second 
stage. 

CPMLDR performs the third stage in 
the cold start process. First, it reads the 
CPM+.SYS file from the disk. (Note that 
unlike other CP/M disks, CBM disks do 
not have a system area and a data area. 
There are no system tracks, since the 
CPMLDR is in ROM.) The CP/M+.SYS 
file contains the BDOS and BIOS sys- 

Table 1 Currently available software. 



NAME 

WORDSTAR 

SPELLSTAR 

MAIL MERGE 

RETRIEVE 

dBASE II 

CARDBOX 

SUPERCALC 

MULTIPAN 

POPULAR series: 
NOMINAL LEGER 
INVOICING 
PAYROLL 
ACCOUNTS- 
COMBO 
SUPER COMBO 

UTILITIES 

DEVPAC 80 
PASCAL 80 

CIS-COBOL 
ANIMATOR 
MACRO 80 
PROFORTRAN 
PROPASCAL 
ECO-C 



tern modules and their locations in 
memory. Once CMPLDR has loaded the 
BDOS and BIOS into memory, itsendsa 
sign-on message to the screen and 
passes control to the BIOS Cold Boot 
entry point. 

The fourth and last stage is done by 
the BIOS Cold Start function, Function 
0. This initializes Page 0. The fourth 
stage is completed when the BIOS Cold 
Start Function loads the CCP from the 
file CCP.COM into memory. The CCP is 
loaded into the TPA which is in Bankl, 
and BankO so that warm start operations 
can copy the CCP into the TPA from 
memory. This speeds up the system 
warm start operation, since the system 
can warm start without loading the CCP 
from disk. Since the CCP loads into and 
executes in the TPA at $0100, Bankl is ' 
put in context at this point. Control is 
then passed to the CCP. 

The CCP displays the prompt for the 
default drive, drive A. If a PROFILE.SUB 
file is present on the default drive, the 
CCP executes this submit file before 
prompting the user for a command. The 
user number is set to zero, unless 
changed by the PROFILE submit file. 
This completes the cold start. 

Communication between 
modules 

When the system cold or warm starts, 
the BIOS loads the CCP into the TPA. 
The CCP moves the Program Loader 
Module (PLM) to the top of the TPA and 
uses the PLM to load transient programs. 

The BDOS contains a set of 32 func- 
tions that the CCP and applications 



programs call to perform disk and char- 
call. 

acter input and output operations. A list 
of the functions carried out by the 
BDOS is in Table B. 

Similarly, the BIOS contains a set of 
33 functions that are called by the BDOS 
to perform hardware-dependent primi- 
tive functions, such as peripheral device 
I/O. 

When a call is made to the BDOS, the 
BDOS makes calls to the BIOS to carry 
out the function required. This can 
mean many BIOS calls for one BDOS 
Communication between the BIOS, 
CCP, and BDOS is via a 1 00 byte area of 
memory within the BDOS called the 
System Control Block (SCB). The SCB 
contains BDOS flags and data, CCP 
flags and data, and other system infor- 
mation, such as keyboard and display 
characteristics and the current date and 
time. Some of the SCB fields may be 
accessed via the BIOS. (NB: the SCB 
contains critical system parameters. If a 
program modifies these parameters, the 
operating system can crash. Use caution 
here!) See BDOS Function 49 in the 
documentation for further information. 
Communication between transient 
programs and the operating system is 
via Page Zero. Page Zero also contains 
critical system parameters, including 
the entry to the BDOS and the entry to 
the BIOS Warm BOOT routine. At sys- 
tem start-up, the BIOS initializes these 
two entry points in Page Zero. All lin- 
kage between transient programs and 
the BDOS is restricted to the indirect 
linkage through Page Zero. 



FROM REMARKS 

Micropro Wordprocessor 

Micropro For WORDSTAR 

Micropro For WORDSTAR 

Sagesoft Database 

Ashton Tate Database 

Caxton Software Simple database 
Sorcim Spreadsheet 

Microsoft Spreadsheet 

Sagesoft 
Accounting leger £99,99 

Stock control 
inc. SSP and P45 
First two above 
First and third above 
The lot 
Commodore CP/M disk & 

documentation 
Hisoft Assembler development 

Hisoft Pascal compiler 

Hisoft 'C compiler 

Microfocus COBOL compiler 

Microfocus Debugging tool 

Microsoft Standard assembler/linker 

Prospero FORTRAN 66 

Prospero Except conformat arrays 

Ecosoft 'C compiler 



APPROX COST 

(UK Prices) 

£129.99 

£86.99 

£86.99 

£59.99 
£119.00 
£124.99 

£99.99 
£129.99 



£69.99 

£69.99 

£149.99 

£149.99 

£199.99 

£24.99 

£39.95 
£39.95 
£39.95 
£129.99 
£129.99 
£129.99 
£129.99 
£129.99 
£169.99 



ERASE Erases a filename from the disk directory and releases the 

storage space occupied by the file. 
RENAME Renames a disk file. 

TYPE Displays contents of an ASCII (TEXT) file at the screen. 

USER Changes to a different user number. 

Table 3 Transient commands supplied. 

COMMAND 

DATE 

DEVICE 



DUMP 
ED 

FORMAT 
GET 

HELP 

INITDIR 

PIP 

PUT 

SET 

SETDEF 

SHOW 

SUBMIT 



FUNCTION 

Sets or displays the date and time. 

Assigns logical CP/M devices to one or more physical devices, 

changes device driver protocol and baud rates, or sets consoles 

screen size. 

Displays a file in ASCII and hexadecimal format. 

Creates and alters character files. 

Creates a new boot disk. 

Temporarily gets console input from a disk file rather than the 

keyboard. 

Displays information on how to use CP/M commands. 

Initializes a disk directory to allow time and date stamping. 

Copies files and combines files. 

Temporarily directs printer or console output to a disk file. 

Sets file options including disk labels, file attributes, type of 

time and date stamping, and password protection. 

Sets system options including the drive search chain. 

Displays disk and drive statistics. 

Automatically executes multiple commands. 



Table 2 Resident commands. 



COMMAND 
DIR 



DIRSYS 



FUNCTION 

Displays filenames of all files in the directory except those 

marked with the SYS attribute. 

Displays filenames of files marked with the SYS (system) 

attribute in the directory. 



Table 4 Transient commands on the Utilities disk. 

COMMAND FUNCTION 

HEXCOM Uses the output from MAC to produce a program file. 

LINK Links REL (relocateable) program modules produced by RMAC 

(relocatable macro assembler) and produces program files. 
MAC Translates assembly language programs into machine code 

form. 
RMAC Translates assembly language programs into relocatable 

program modules. 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 67 



tm/ 


wm—m 

SID 
XREF 


Helps you check your programs and interactively correct 
programming errors. 

Produces a cross-reference list of variables used in an 
assembler program. 


40COL none 
PRT1 none 
PRT2 none 
6551 9600 


output 
output 
output 
both 


Device 2, 40 column display 
Device 3, serial bus printer (device 4) 
Device 4, serial bus printer (device 5) 
Device 5, ext crt 


Table 5 Reserved Filetypes. 


Table 8 BDOS File System Functions. 

Disk System Reset Get Disk Free Space 


FILETYPE 


MEANING 


Drive Selection 




Chain to Program 


ASM 


Assembler source file 


File Creation 




Flush Buffers 


BAS 


BASIC source file 


File Open 




Get/Set System Control Block 


COM 


280 or equivalent machine language program 


File Close 




Call BIOS 


HEX 


Output file from MAC (used by HEXCOM) 


Directory Search 




Load Overlay 


HLP 


HELP message file 


File Delete 




Call RSX 


$$$ 


Temporary file 


File Rename 




Truncate File 


PRN 


Print file from MAC or RMAC 




I Read 


Set Directory Label 


REL 


Output file from RMAC (used by LINK) 




I Write 


Get File Data Stamps/Password Mode 


SUB 


List of commands to be executed by SUBMIT 


Interrogate Selected Disks 


Write File XFCB 


SYM 


Symbol file from MAC, RMAC or LINK 


Set DMA Address 




Set/Get Date and Time 


SYS 


Systems file 


Set/Reset File Attributes 


Set Default Password 


RSX 


Resident System Extension (a file automatically loaded by a 






Return CP/M Serial Number 




command file when needed) 


Set BDOS Multi-Sector Count 


Get/Set Program Return Code 


Table 6 Operating System modules. 


Set BDOS Error Mode 

Table 9 Drive Table. 


Parse Filename 


MODULE 


LOCATION REMARKS 








CCP 


CCP. SYS Console Command Processor. Basic 
user interface to the operating system. 


NAME TYPE 

A 1541/1571 


REMARKS 




LOADER 


CCP.SYS Program Loader Module. Loads 

transient (applications) programs from 
disk. 


B 1541/1571 
C 1541/1571 
D 1541/1571 






BDOS 


CPM+ SYS Basic Disk Operating System. Interface 


E VIRTUAL 


Shares drive 


A 




between application program and the 


F 


Not present 






physical I/O routines of the BIOS. 


G 


Not present 




BIOS 


CMP+.SYS and ROM Basic Input Output System. Performs all 
physical I/O in the system. ROM section 


H 

I 


Not present 
Not present 






contains 8502 and display drivers. 


J 
K 


Not present 
Not present 




Table 7 BDOS File System Functions. 


L 

M EXTERNAL 


Not present 

Memory disk (RAM disk) 


DEVICE BAUD RATE DIRECTION REMARKS 


N 


Not present 




KEYS none 


input Device 0, internal keyboard 


O 






80COL none 


output Device 1, 80 column display 


P 








ICPUG is a highly influen- 
tial organisation and brings 
many benefits to its mem- 
bers across the whole 
range of Commodore 
activity. CCI considered 
that a regular column from 

ICPUG would be of 

interest to many readers. 

The views expressed by 

ICPUG may not be those 

of CCI 



Considering that it came out in 1 982, the 
Commodore 64 is a very remarkable 
machine. Firstly, it has survived four 
years of use, abuse and criticism — no 
mean feat i n itself for a micro. It has sold 
over seven million units worldwide — 
more than anything else on the planet, 
been turned into a portable in the form 
of the 'SX64', and now repackaged in a 
128 lookalike box with GEOS; a GEM- 
like operating environment bundled in. 
Maybe in the future we shall see a C64D. 
One thing is certain though, that what- 
ever happens to the Amiga, its rumoured 
next-generation replacement or the 1 28, 
and 128D, the C64 is with us for a long 
time yet. 

Talking of the Amiga, I think that 
Commodore's pricing policy may well 
pay off in the long term. Commodore 
need to regain their business reputation 
and the introduction of Sidecar, which is 
a bolt-on IBM clone, complete with 
memory, slots, etc. goes a long way 
towards that aim. The staggering thing 
about sidecar, is that the Amiga treats it 
as just another task — you can still play 
Mindwalker or run d Paint, or whatever. 
Back to the price. In the business world, 
first impressions count, and if the Amiga 
is perceived as a games machine, then it 
doesn't stand a chance. Fortunately for 
us mere impoverished mortals who are 
just plain enthusiasts, Commodore have 
committed themselves to Amiga as a 
complete range — the up-market Duo, 



and maybe even a 'cost reduced' A500. 

As an enthusiast I am always 
impressed by clever programming, and 
Compunet seems to be the place to find 
it. ICPUG is of course committed both to 
Compunet and to Micronet, and we 
have our own area on both 'nets (follow 
the routing from Clubspot 810 on 
Prestel, and GOTO ICPUG on Com- 
punet). 

Overall (and many people in ICPUG 
will disagree with this), I think that 
Compunet is the better network. Slower, 
yet but far more versatile. You can 
upload programs and text, even 
graphics, with hardly a moments 
thought, and it's there, available to 
everyone else instantly. Compare that 
with i-'restel, where any text has to be 
sent or mailboxed to an editor, and it 
may be several days or even weeks 
before it appears on the net. Programs 
have to be sent off to Micronet, and 
might not appear at all! 

The ease of interaction between users 
on Compunet has provided a very useful 
forum for programmers to try out ideas 
and experiment. For example, a short 
routine may appear on the system to 
write a message in the screen border. 
Somebody else comes along and says 
'hey I like that' and produces a scrolling 
message in the border. Further devel- 
opments then start to appear, such as 
colour and even animation. 

I can't wait for the Amiga version of 
Compunet to appear! 



68 Commodore Computing November 1 986 




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President, Electronic Arts 



s Committed to the Amiga 



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We believe that one day soon the home computer will be as important 

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These electronic marvels are significant because they bring faraway 
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But so far, the computers promise has been hard to see. Software 



has been severely limited by the abstract, blocky shapes and rinky- 
dink sound reproduction of most home computers. Only a handful 
of pioneers have been able to appreciate the possibilities. But then, 
popular opinion once held that television was only useful for 
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A Promise of Artistry. 

The Amiga is advancing our medium on all fronts. For the first time, 
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The first Amiga software products from Electronic Arts are near 
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*BAS/C/ 




I n the last part of the series we looked at 
logical operators and examined what 
they were. I now want to look at what 
they can do and how they can be of use 
to us in programming, in particular the 
OR and NOT operators. The truth table 
for the OR operator is as follows: 
OR = 

OR 1 = 1 

1 OR = 1 
1 OR 1 = 1 

Similar to the AND operator discussed 
is the last part of the series, this operator 
can be ustilised for range checking and 
also for setting bits within an address 
location or processor register. For 
example consider the following code 
fragment: 

100 IF (X<8) OR (X>11) THEN PRINT 
"INVALID DISK DRIVE SELECTED" 

Here we have used the OR operator to 
test that the user has input the correct 
drive unit number as part of a disk drive 
selection routi'ne. You can see that it is 
perfectly clear and unambiguous Eng- 
lish and the only specialist knowledge 
required is the range of unit numbers 
the 1500-series drive can have. Try re- 
writing the above fragment using the 
AND operator. A hint would be using the 
assignments >= and =< 

I mentioned earlier that the OR opera- 
tor can be used for setting the bit values 
of addresses or processor registers, but 
I didn't mention what this means. You 
will recall from earlier sections of this 
series that the numbers and letters you 
type into your machine from the key- 
board are converted into binary num- 



PART 

VIII 



bers. A binary number can only consist 
of either numeric value zero (0) or one 
(1). With the exception of the AMIGA, all 
Commodore computers maintain the 
representation of the users numbers or 
characters internally in a length of eight 
of these zero's or one's which are 
referred to as bits. Hence your compu- 
ters processor is technically referred to 
as an 8-bit machine. A bit is said to set 
when its value is 1 and cleared when its 
value is 0. 

Manipulating these bits is more within 
the realms of assembly language pro- 
gramming although an appreciation of 
the whys and wherefores will be of value 
to you in preparing the way to this. Con- 
sider the following statement: 
PRINT 2 OR 8 

If you try this on your machine the 
answer will be 10 - why? Lets break- 
down the decimal number 2 and 8 into 
their 8-bit binary equivalents: 
2 = 0000001 8 = 00001 000 

Now refer back to the truth table for 
OR: 

2... 00000010 
8... 00001000 



OR =0 

OR 1 =1 

1 OR 0=1 

1 OR 1 =1 

00000010 which is the 
binary equivalent of 10. 



Try this one: 
PRINT 254 OR 64 answer: 254 
PRINT 254 OR 128 answer: 254 (?!?!!?!?) 
OR 0=0 254... 11111111 254... 11111111 
OR 1=1 64... 01000000 128... 10000000 

OR 0=1 

1 OR 1=1 11111111 ...254... 11111111 

Notice how all of the bits have been 
set, that is turned into 1's which give the 
answer of 254. The AND operator does 
the opposite: 

PRINT 254 AND 64 answer: 64 
PRINT 254 AND 128 answer: 128 
AND 0=0 254... 11111111 254... 11111111 

AND 1=1 64... 01000000 128... 10000000 

1 AND 0=0 

1 OR 1=1 01000000 10000000 

By using the AND/OR operators sim- 
ple comparative testing can be made 
provided you understand binary arith- 
metic - which you really should make 
efforts to come to terms with. The 
remaining logical operator is the NOT 
function which has the following truth 
table: 
NOT = 1 

NOT 1=1 

1 NOT = 
1 NOT 1 = 

In other words this operator changes the 
bit to its opposite condition. Try using ther 
NOT operator on a modification of our 
previous examples: 
PRINT NOT 64 answer: -65 
PRINT NOT 128 answer: -129 

Now, what do they have here? We 
have discovered a means of reversing 
the sign of a number and increasing its 
value at the same time - how can this 



Commodore Computing November 1986 73 




device since ALL DEFAULT input is 
assumed from this unit. The numbering 
system adopted by Commodore for 
these devices is as follows: 



PART VIII 



be of use? Well there is a little-used 
function in Commodore BASICthat can 
be utilised for this phenomena, namely 
the SGN function, but before we look at 
this I'll just demonstrate a practical 
example of the use of the NOT operator: 



100 IF NOT ok THEN GOSUB 500 



500 PRINT "There is an error in the 
procedure" 

The variable ok was defined earlier in 
the illustrated program code and was 
set to test for an error condition. Should 
this occur then program control is trans- 
ferred to a user warning routine starting 
at line 500. 

The SGN function relates quite closely 
to logical operations and calculates the 
sign value of a numeric expression. For 
example if an expression is negative, the 
SGN function yields a value of -1, a 
value of +1 if the expression is positive 
and finally if the expression is zero 
value. Thus if: 

A = B then SGN (A-B) is equal toO 
A>B then SGN (A-B) is equal to 1 
A<B then SGN (A-B) is equal to -1 

This all may seem a little complex and 
the question arises of "is all this neces- 
sary?" Remember back to the very first 
part of this series - computer pro- 
gramming is all about comparisons 
between values. The use of logical 
operators providefurthertools for use in 
the programmers armoury. An example 
of the use of SGN to select multiple 
branches is as follows: 
100 ON SGN(A)+2 GOTO 1000,2000,3000 

Thus if the variable (a) is a negative 
value then the program branches to line 
1 000, if equal to zero then to line 2000 or 
if positive then to line 3000. For further 
manipulations on the sign of a number 
the ABS function is provided. This 
makes a negative number positive and 
vice-versa, in the case of zero this is left 



unchanged since Commodore BASIC 
does not understand the esoteric prin- 
ciples of positive and negative zero as 
found in the high mathematics of quan- 
tum mechanics and atomic particle 
physics! 

We'll now move on to something a 
little less cerebral and talk about files 
and input/output. Whenever you press 
the PLAY button on your cassette deck 
or type in the words LOAD or SAVE you 
set in motion many operations inter- 
nally. The computerfirst has to decipher 
the instruction in terms of an input 
request - a LOAD command, or an 
output request - the SAVE command. 
In addition the computer has to have 
some means of identifying the block of 
date just as you do and some kind of a 
name must be ascribed to this data 
block or file as it is commonly called. 
Finally, there must be some type of con- 
trol over where the data or file is to be 
placed. After all, a filing cabinet would 
be of little use if the files were just 
thrown in at random into any drawer. 
We have probably all met this condition 
at some stage and are well aware of the 
frustration it brings - imagine a tele- 
phone directory that was not in any sort 
of order! There are two further com- 
mands used in BASIC programming - 
OPEN and CLOSE and it is these which 
form the next part of the series. 

Commodore BASIC uses a number- 
ing system in order to identify the var- 
ious devices attached to the computer. 
Some of these devices you probably 
may take for granted whilst others may 
be in position where you never thought 
about them and include the screen, 
keyboard, cassette unit, printer and disk 
drive. There are limitations on some 
devices, for example you cannot treat 
the screen or printer as an input device, 
they are always an output device and 
therefore a file can only be saved to 
these. Similarly, the keyboard can only 
function as an input device although 
this is not implemented as a separate 



Device 


Number 


Cassette 


1 


RS-232 


2 


Screen 


3 


Printer 


4 


Printer (alt) 


5 


Plotter 


6 


User-Defined 


7 


Disk Unit 


8 to 11 


User-Defined 


12 to 31 



Devices 7 and 12 to 31 are rarely met, 
if ever in BASIC programming. To 
communicate between devices we need 
to open to file or instruct the computer 
to inform the relevant unit that we want 
to talk to it - at this stage it has not been 
decided what form the communication 
will take, i.e. input or output. All we are 
doing is to instruct the device to listen. 
This concept of talk and listen is very 
important in BASIC programming, only 
the computer can serve as the central 
contraller and hence issue the instruc- 
tions. It is possible for another device to 
instruct a further device to do some- 
thing although the final control remains 
in the hands of the computer. For exam- 
ple, opening and then reading a file from 
the disk which contains instructions 
that the printer should do something is 
perfectly feasible, however remember 
that there is a drawback to regaining 
rapid control should anything go wrong 
and tbe program controlling this is 
flawed. 

To inform a device that we no longer 
wish to talk to it means closingthe file. It 
is very important to remember which file 
is open since you can have several files 
open at any given time, so it is vital that 
the correct file is closed after use. The 
method and control of opening and 
closing files is done by means of 
numbers, the syntax being: 
OPEN <file number> <device number> 
CLOSE < file number> <device number> 

The file number can be any number 
from 1 up to 255 although it makes sense 
to use single digit numbers as they are 
easier to remember since it is up to you the 
programmer to keep track of these num- 
bers - the system will not do it for you. 

Some examples of file initiations are: 

OPEN 1 ,1 open file number 1 to 

cassette unit 
OPEN 9,3 open file number 9 to the 

screen 
CLOSE 2,4 close file number 2 to the 

printer 
CLOSE 8,8 close file number 8 to the 

disk drive 
In the next part of this series I will be 
going further into files and how they are 
handled by Commodore BASIC. 



74 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



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all others available 

Dustcovers* 

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CBM16 £1.75 

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Cartridges 

Arrow (tape speed up 

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Help (20 programming 

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THE BRITISH MUSIC FAIR 



A musical feast for eyes 
and ears. Ian Waugh 
makes a glutton of 
himself. 



Even if your musical ability extends no 
furtherthan humming a Madonnasingle 
or saying n-n-n-nineteen, this was the 
place to be. The British Music Fair (let's 
be informal and call it the BMF) held in 
London in August. Every conceivable 
type of musical instrument was there 
including, of course, many which were 
plugged into computers with astonish- 
ing effects. 

Commodore owners had plenty to 
look at and play with. Most of the 
equipment was heavily biased towards 
MIDI — it is, after all, the best way to 
make use of a computer in your music — 
but Music Sales had their range of 
Commodore Music software on show, 
too. This included their clip-on key- 
board, the Sound Sampler, Music Maker 
II, and their new Sound Expander, of 
course, which produces brilliant FM 
sounds. There was something here fOr 
everyone, from the pro to the dabbler 
and such a range of music books to 
make your mouth water and your fin- 
gers itch. 

For the dedicated computer musician 
there was a special Computer Music 
Stand on which several manufacturers 
demonstrated their (soft)wares. 

We'll start with EMR (ElecroMusic 
Research) whose Mike Beecher was 
putting their range of MIDI software 
through its paces. 

Their Commodore 64 Performer is a 
real-time (ie. the mistakes you play are 
the mistakes you get) MIDI package. It 
lets you record on up to 8 tracks and 
boasts a host of features such as over- 
dub, transposition, count-in, an auto- 
note correct facility (or quantisation as it 
is technically and affectionately known), 
looping, text storage and an arrange- 
ment feature which lets you make up to 
64 arrangements from your 8 recorded 
tracks. The Performer costs £49.94 and 
the MIDI Interface £79.90. Phone EMR's 
MIDI Infoline on 0702 335747. 

Joreth were there demonstrating the 
very latest version of their Music Com- 
poser System which has just been 
reduced (reduced?) to £225. This in- 
cludes their own super MIDI interface. 
The program uses an MCL (Music 
Composition Language) designed with 
the musician in mind. It gives you real- 
time and step-time input with lots of 
sophisticated editing facilities. It has 
loads of extras which would take the rest 
of the magazine to talk about but if you 



give them a ring (0386 831615) they'll 
send you all the details. 

Steinberg software was on show, too. 
Their much-praised PRO-1 6 Sequencer 
(£100) was there for all to see and play 
with. This professional piece of software 
allows both real- and the step-time input 
and it is a real job to use. Also avialable 
is a music notation system called the 
TNS Scorewriter (£130) and new is the 
Edit Kit (£30) which is an editor for the 
PRO-1 6 (£30), on disc or EPROM. 

Even newer isTrackstar, an introduc- 
tory MIDI package for anyone who may 
be hesitant about taking the plunge into, 
the world of MIDI. £70 buys an 8-track 
polyphonic sequencer program plus 
MIDI interface which can't be bad at all. 
The program operates like a multi-track 
recorder to bridge the gap between 
audio and digital recording. The screen 
even shows revolving tape spools to 
heighten the effect. Contact Steinberg 
Research UK on 08675 5277. 

Rittor Music were proudly demon- 



strating Passport's Master Tracks, a 16- 
channel real- and the step-time 
sequencer with editing features such as 
cut, copy and paste with the ability to 
see and hear the music as you edit it. A 
song mode lets you build up to 256 dif- 
ferent sequences from your recorded 
tracks. Master tracks has a RRP of 
£199.95 and a Passport interface costs 
£1 09.95 or £1 49.95 with a tape sync facil- 
ity. Contact Rittor Music on 01-952 
5302. 

Of course, if you already havea MIDI 
interface for your Commodore you 
would probaby spend a great deal of 
time looking at instruments you can 
plug into it. That's what the BMF is all 
about arid the 30,000 people who passed 
through the exhibition would no doubt 
agree. It's probably the greatest musical 
show on earth. 

Make a date — see you there next 
year. 

I.W. 



Music Scene by Leslie B. Bunder 



KNIGHT RIDER from 
OCEAN with music by 
Martin Galway 

While thegame'KNIGHTRIDER' wasn't 
up to much, the soundtrack on the other 
hand fully supports the view that music 
is now an integral part of computer 
games and needs to be there. 

Martin Galway's short but to the point 
50 second rendition of the televisions' 
main theme is faithfully reproduced. 

The flow of the music is a cross 
between the actual theme tune and 
Galway's own individual style as often 
heard on all the loading screens for the 
OCEAN/IMAGINE range of games. 

MIAMI VICE from 
OCEAN with music by 
Martin Galway 

Yet another soundtrack from Martin 
Galway and possibly the best yet from 
him, ".,:;•,",■''""■ 

Galway, has taken the '64 and turned 
it, musically sounding, into a mini- 
AMIGA. 

All the hooks, swaying beats and 
sound which made MIAMI VICE into 
one of the best instrumental songs to 
grace the top 10 are here. The sound- 
track lasts for 12 minutes, and naturally, 
Galway, has had to condense it down 



from 5 minutes worth of music, as used! 
on the single. This means that what you I 
actually hear is the soundtrack as used I 
on the opening and closing credits of| 
the television series. 

MIAMI VICE shows that originall 
soundtracks can be reproduced on thel 
'64 and don't have to botched up as has I 
quite often happened in the past withl 
'Back To The Future' and that awful ren-| 
ditton of 'The Power of Love'. MIAMll 
VICE is a very complicated song and it's| 
nice to hear that Galway has been care- 
ful about the way in which he arranged itl 
for the '64. If Galway, can work wonders! 
with MIAMI VICE on the '64, imaginej 
what he could dn on an AMIGA!! 

I.C.U.P.S. by Thor 

I.C.U.P.S deserves some sort of award.) 
The reason is that it's possibly the firstj 
game where the soundtrack is a lot bet- 
ter than the actual game itself. Thel 
music is well presented, polished and! 
comes across very well. Thor have| 
come up with what can loosely be des- 
cribed as a 'Heavy Metal' anthem for| 
the Commodore 64. 

Interesting fact: I gather some of thel 
sounds were 'sampled' from real in-J 
struments, if this is the case, I hopeThorl 
come up with some more similar excel-| 
lent soundtracks. 



Commodore Computing November 1986 77 



IT 



ffir-T 



^ \ 



3| 




COMMODORE 

GETTING IT TOGETHER 
-INTERNATIONALLY 



Internationally, Commodore is regain- 
ing its strength. That was the message 
that was forcefully carried away by a 
gathering of Commodore distributors 
from around the world held in the UK in 
September. 

The conference was organized by 
Commodore Electronics — the over- 
seas arm of CBM that controls almost all 
the world business of Commodore 
except North America, UK and some 
countries on mainland Europe. Telecon- 
ference brought together key people 
from the main distributors of Commo- 
dore products from such countries as 
Spain, Portugal, Eastern Europe, Cyprus, 
Greece, Turkey, Finland, the Middle and 
Far East, Scandinavia and other coun- 
tries where CBM needs to prosper to 
ensure that it continues as a globalforce 
in computing. Commodore Electronics 
is headed up by Nick Bessey who 
moved from General Manager UKto run 
this vital division. However a measure of 
the importancewith which Commodore 
regards these countries may be judged 
from the fact that Tom Rattigan, CBM's 
world president was on hand to make 
the keynote opening speech. 

Rattigan was able to outline a much 
more optimistic picture than would have 
been possible a fewmonths ago. Hetold 
distributors that Commodore was back 
on course again to recover its position 
as world leader inthe micro market 

Gail Wellington, whose six years with 
Commodore must make her the most 
experienced member of the Commo- 
dore international team, presented the 
whole range of Commodore products 
that CBM offers worldwide. 

She revealed some exciting new de- 
velopments including a Commodore 
mouse for the new 64C which will take 
advantage of the GEOS package. There 
are also plans for a 3 1 / 2 inch drive for 
non-Amiga Commodore machineswhich 
will fit into the picture that is generally 
taken of the way micros are moving. 



It was also confirmed that CCI's 
exclusive report in the September Issue 
that CBM had considerably advanced 
development of other Amiga range 
computers was firmly based. The higher 
and lower range Amigas will almost cer- 
tainly be slotted into Commodore's 
marketing strategies for the beginning 
of 1987 

AN Demin, recently appointed 
Commodore Electronics international 
Marketing Manager, presented the out- 
lines of marketing structures and 
strategies that should bring Commo- 
dore's internationaldistributors success 
even in highly competitive markets. He 
pointed out that Commodore's brand 
image was still a highly positive factor 
around the world. 

Nick Bessey, Managing Director of 
Commodore Electronics painted a frank 
and clear picture not just of the advan- 
tages but also the problems that needed 
to be faced in Commodore's present 
recovering circumstances. The turna- 
round in recent months from massive 
loss to modest profit had not been easy 
to achieve. It had been done by severe 
trimming of costsand also by making up 
for past errors. It was vital for Commo- 
dore to continuesuccessfully along this 
same path. To be a successful profit- 
making company costs must be kept 
down and margins up. It had to be 
remembered that the whole Commo- 
dore product range of computers the 
new 64C, the 1 28and 1 20D, the upgraded 
PC's and the Amiga family — every one 
had been launched only in the last 15 
months — an outstanding achievement 
for any company. Two outside organiza- 
tions were invitedto make presentations 
to the Conference a leading computer- 
based training organization and CCI. 
Antony Jacobson, CCI's Publisher and 
Managing Editor, told the audience of 
CCI's uniquely international approach 
and coverage. He also pointed out, to 
some laughter from the distributors, 



Tom Rattigan, 
Commodore's 
President 

Al Demin of 

Commodore 

Electronics 

Distibutors 

at the 

International 

Conference. 

that his was the only presentation that 
had used the much vaunted Amiga gra- 
phics as a visual aid. 

There were other sessions in work- 
shop style to examine the problems 
faced by distributors. Commodore's dis- 
tributors are at the sharp end of the 
change fortunes of the company. They 
cannot all be entirely happy with the 
way things have gone over the last two 
years. In open and very frank discus- 
sions they were able to make their wor- 
ries known. Was Commodore really a 
capable of supplying them with suffi- 
cient product? And when and where 
they wanted it... Could it protect them 
from "grey imports"? ("Grey imports" 
are products brought without a manu- 
facturers approval from one country to 
another to take advantage of price dif- 
ferentials.) 

Nick Bessey and AN Demin gave 
these and other points patently honest 
and even blunt answers. Commodore's 
distribution channels were being made 
more efficient... Everything that could 
be done would beto protect the distribu- 
tors from illicit imports. It would give 
special attention and personnel if 
necessary to help them deal with their 
difficulties. 

For most of us individually Commo- 
dore is thought of as some anonymous 
manufacturer responsible somewhere 
for making our own computer. But the 
reality is that it is far more than that. It is 
a global sales organization. It is a world 
power in the marketing of microcompu- 
ters. In countries where names like 
Spectrum and Amstrad mean little, 
Commodore is a household brand name. 
This conference held in the quiet luxury 
of an English country hotel is one of a 
chain of activities that create the under- 
standing and the organization that are 
vitally necessary if Commodore is to 
stay "Thinking Ahead" and to maintain 
its position at the forefront of the global 
computer market. 



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■ Understanding and using the Input/Ourdoor ports 

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character length and width management 

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Programming Queries: 
Dear Rae, 

I have two problems. I typed in a pro- 
gram called "Castle Adventure", and 
when I press RUN, the screen says "You 
can go nowhere" and when I type any- 
thing else it says "try rephrasing it', so I 
just can't get anywhere. 

Another programme "A Fairytale 
Adventure", has a type mismatch in line 
40. Line40 is ... 40 RESTORE: FOR X=1 
TO 72: READ Q$(X): FOR Y=1 TO 4: 
READ S%(X,Y): NEXT Y,X. Can you 
explain why? 
T. Gillan, Aberdeen. 



Dear Mr Gillan, 

It's always hard to debug programs by 
mail. Perhaps a general comment would 
be helpful with your first query. Most 
BASIC programs are written in a fairly 
straightforward way, with, for example, 
screen drawing routines and DATA 
statements collected together: this 
makes sense, since the programmer 
would otherwise have to work harder 
than necessary. If you look at the origi- 
nal program listing, you'll probably be 
able to work out roughly how the pro- 
gram is intended to work. In your case, 
RUN seems to sent your program into 
an inappropriate location; perhaps a 
GOTO is wrong, or data has been set up 
wrongly. 

In your second query, line 40 is 
intended to read 72 batches of informa- 
tion, each batch being a string variable 
followed by four integers — something 
like this: "giant",24, 1,2,3 where the four 
numbersare used by the program for its 
own purposes. A type mismatch simply 
means you haven't got your data state- 
ments to match this layout, and the pro- 
gram is, for example, trying to read a 
word as though it were a number. 

Dear Rae, 

I have a problem concerning converting 
the "News Delivery Checker" program 
in the July '86 issue of CCI. Is it possible 
to convert this program for the C16? 
M. G. Major, South Killingholme 

Dear Mr Major, 

Let me answer this in a way which may 
be helpful to more readers. Commodore 
machines (apart from Amiga) have sim- 
ilar BASICs, so it's often possible to run 
a program written for (say) the 64 on 
(say) a Plus/4 — and much easier than 
trying to adapt some other BASIC, e.g. 
Apple. But later machines tend to have 
more features than earlier ones; C16, 
Plus/4, and C128 all have graphics 
commands which are missing from the 
64, for example. So a pure BASIC pro- 
gram can often be typed directly from a 
C64 into a C16, but the reverse process 
may be more difficult. 

Programs with PEEKs and POKEs 
(typically to control sound and/or gra- 



» • 



This month your letters are answered by 
Rae West. Rae is the author of three 
large reference books on Commodore 
computers; the latest is Programming the 
Commodore 64, following Programming 



the VIC and Programming the PET/CBM. 
All are published in the UK by Level Ltd. 
Rae is also published in the USA by 
Compute! Books. 



phics with the C64) generally don't 
transfer between computes; miss them 
out and try to find substitutes. 

A serious problem with the C16 is its 
small memory; a long program, or a 
program which stores a lot of data in 
memory, may simply not fit into a C16, 
and therefore not be usable with it. It 
makes sense to guess the amount of 
memory a program will need before typ- 
ing it in. Look for DIM statements — 
arrays can use up a lot of space. 

Dear Rae, 

I played a lot of Bingo on holiday. Could 
you make a Bingo game for the 64? The 
game could have cards and counters 
and check for winning lines. 
Daniel Smith (Age 9), Rochdale. 

Dear Daniel, 

Thanks for your letter and your interest- 
ing idea. If you think about it, you'll 
probably agree that a computer game 
might not be much fun — the computer 
would do everything, and the 'players' 
would just sit and watch, until one of the 
computergenerated cards won. Maybe 
this is why no-one has done this. 

Another interesting problem is to 
print your own Bingo cards — you have 
to make sure they're all different. 

Graphics on the 64 and 128: 

Dear Rae, 

I'm writing to you on the subject of 'Bank 
Switching' on my 64. I wish to display 
some sprites which are in a high 
memory location. I've got a far as poking 
56576 to change the VIC chip's bank, 
but locations 53272 and 648 also seem 
to be important. Please Help!! 
J. Fletcher, Colchester. 

Dear Mr Fletcher, 

This is quite complex. 53272 does 
change the start addresses used by the 
VIC chip, and 648 is used by ordinary 
BASIC. I'm sending you a copy of a dia- 
gram which shows all the combinations 
available with the 64, which should help; 
it shows how you can select which part 
of memory will hold the screen, the cha- 
racter set, and sprite definitions. 

Dear Rae, 

I have a problem with high-resolution 
multicolor graphics on the Commodore 
1 28. The colour map, generally stored in 
1000 bytes after $D800, appears not to 
work in BASIC 7 (though it still works in 
machine code). There appears to be a 
separate colour area. 
Tim Watson, Hitchin. 

Dear Mr Watson, 

Graphics on the 128 are complicated by 
the fact that the system uses interrupts, 
in order to allow split-screen graphics. 
At each interrupt, VIC chip registers get 



reset unless intermediate or 'shadow' 
locations are set. (Unlike the 64, where 
pokes to the VIC chip can be made 
directly). With standard BASIC graphics 
and text this is fine, but otherwise it can 
make life difficult. I suggest you consult 
Commodore's official C128 Program- 
mers Reference Guide (one source of 
supply is Biblios, on 0403-710971), 
where pages 243 and 213 throw light on 
the matter. 

Disk Queries: 

Dear Rae, 

I own a C64 and 1541 disk drive and 
hope to buy a Commodore 128. The 
question I'd like to ask — and perhaps 
many other people — is whether the 
1541 disk is fully compatible with the 
128 in all 3 modes. 
W. L. Williams, Lampeter. 

Dear Mr Williams, 

No, it isn't. But it is very largely compat- 
ible. The 1570 (single sided) and 1571 
(double sided) have a few extra facili- 
ties: (i) they can read disks recorded on 
other computers, for example Kaypro, 
and hence CP/M disks produced by 
these machines; (ii) they have a faster 
mode, called 'burst' mode, written into 
ROM, which means they can transfer 
data faster. Some software checks for 
this, and takes advantage of it if it's pres- 
ent. Note that 1541 and 1571 ROMs are 
different, so some programs (eg with 
custom fast-loaders) may work on one 
but not the other. 

In short, for most purposes, you could 
happily stick with your 1541; mostly 
you won't notice much difference. 

Dear Rae, 

I've been told that it's possible to switch 
the 'magic eye' on the 1 541 disk d rive via 
a homemade external switch. So, when 
using double sided disks you only flick 
the switch instead of cutting a hole in 
the disk. Can you explain? PS. I have 
bought your latest book which I con- 
sider to be explained better than any 
other. PPS. I still don't understand how 
to program my computer? 
J. Kelly, York. 

Dear Mr Kelly, 

When floppies were expensive, people 
would occasionally use both sides of a 
disk by cutting a notch opposite the 
write-protect notch and simply turn the 
disk over. If you disconnect the write- 
protect mechanism, you still have to 
turn disk over to do this — the system 
doesn't turn itself into a double-sided 
system with two read/write heads. 

Most people (including myself) don't 
recommend this; the other side may not 
be reliable, and reversing the direction 
of the disk is believed to make its surface 
relatively dirty. 

Thanks for your nice comments. 



Commodore Computing November 1986 81 



fRmem 



PLUS GRAPH 

for the Plus/4 



PLUS GRAPH is a graphics package for 
the PLUS/4 and C64, utilising the high 
resolution mode of either machine, that 
is 320 by 200. The product allows the 
creation of barcharts, line graphs and 
pie charts using direct-entry data from 
the keyboard or from the storage device 
which in this case is the disk drive. A full 
editing capability allows the incorpora- 
tion of text into the graphic display in 
addition to redrawing the existing 
numeric data. Thus new lines or circles 
can be added at the user's discretion 
together with the facility to perform fills 
on the circles. 




The line graph provides 3 lines by 
allowing up to 3 sets of data, each set 
containing a maximum of 50 values. The 
bar chart also allows 3 sets although 
only 1 2 values per set are allowed whilst 
the pie chart only allows 1 set with 9 
values in the set. Therefore the line 
graph facility allows you to plot a maxi- 
mum of 150 values, the bar chart only 36. 
I was particularly interested in PLUS 
GRAPH from the point of view of the 
PLUS/4 since application software 
packages for this machine, as readers 
will know well, is few and far between. 
The product supports 1525, 1526/MPS 
802 and MPS 801 printers only which I 
felt seriously limited it use since many 
users, including myself have Centronics 
interface printers such as EPSON. It 
would have been nice to have had a 
Centronics printer driver built-in. No 
such problems with the disk drive, the 
PLUS GRAPH manual mentions only 
the 1541 drive - I found no problems at 
all in using a 1571 drive running in 1571 
mode. 

The data entry into PLUS GRAPH can 
come from the keyboard or from 
sequential ASCII files created by a 
spreadsheet, wordprocessor or data- 
base. The opening screen is reminiscent 
of a spreadsheet with columns and 



rows, the cursor can be moved around 
the screen using a combination of the 
cursor keys and the function keys. The 



S5?W? 



E8259 
55165 
49952. 
44798. 
39644 
34436 
29336. 
24183 
19628 
13874 

6726 
S 

8728 
13874 
■19828 
24182 
29336 
■34438 
39644 
+4798 
43852 
55185 
68258 

"M 



96-1 
ASS 
27,? 
376 



376 
272 

168 
■36-! 



*""'' '•-- 



lL 



IT 




I 6B0S5 PDOriT 

D 8(1 pKoni 



21 page manual was rather confusing at 
this point since some of the descriptions 
given were incorrect foroperating with a 
PLUS/4 and were actually meant for the 
C64. However, with a little perseverance 
all became clear, but a black mark to 
Tri-Micro for not clarifying this before 
finally releasing the product. This ability 
to accept ASCII SEQ files is very impor- 
tant since this file structure is the com- 
mon currency of most data transfers 
between Commodore machines and 
applications. There are limits to the size 
of SEQ files — only 50 records, although 
splitting up sequential files is not very 
difficult. 

The actual drawing of the graphs was 
commendably fast, proving the efficiency 



of the graphics operating system of the 
PLUS/4. The graphs could be automati- 
cally scaled and provision was to spec- 
ify integers rather than the default of 
single-precision floating point numbers. 
The data, once it was in the machine 
could be manipulated in terms of mov- 
ing columns around and copying — 
very impressive. Files could be saved to 
disk although they could only be read 
back by PLUS GRAPH, a pity really as it 
would be nice to call the graph files into 
other programmes. 





The disk supplied also contained two 
other programs specifically for the 
PLUS/4. One was a straightforward 
1541 BACKUP which copies unpro- 
tected disks between 1541's. Beware of 
the limitations of this — it cannot copy 
relative files or deal with sequential files 
greater than 90 blocks. The other pro- 
gram was a disk file-renamer and format 
utility. I would imagine that most users 
have copies of all of these programs 
since they are virtually public-domain 
these days. The disk format seemed 
totally unnecessary as the PLUS/4 has 
the built-in HEADER command. 

PLUS GRAPH is certainly worth con- 
sidering if you have a requirement to 
view your data in graphical form. Apart 
from the confusing manual, it is simple 
to use and above all — quick in opera- 
tion. There are limitations on what the 
user can do in terms of printed output 
and interaction with other software pie- 
ces however. Overall I liked PLUS 
GRAPH — a serious programmer could 
easily overcome these limitations and 
turn a useful product into a powerful 
one. 

Supplier: INTERNA TIONAL TRI-MICRO 
Inc. 

14072 Stratton Way 
Santa Ana. CA 92705 
USA 
Tel. (714) 832-6707 



82 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



** TAPE BACKUP DEVICES FOR VIC 20 CBM 64 C28 ** 



DCL1 Price eiO.OO 

INTERFACE 

ORDER AS DCL1. 



The DCL1 links two Datasettes, so that a back-up can be made directly 
from one datasette lo a second datasette without the program entering the 
computer. No software needed. Backs-up ALL programs including Turbos 
etc 



DCL4 Price £17.00 

INTERFACE 

OROERASDCL4: 

DCL4A 
INTERFACE 



NOW WITH IMPROVED CIRCUITRY 
You can- make a back-up copy on either a second datasette OR on a 
standard audio recorder with this interface without the program entering 
the computer. No software needed. A LED data monitor shows the start & 
ertt) of programs. Backs-up ALL programs including Turbos etc. 

NOW WITH IMPROVED CIRCUITRY 

SIMILAR TO THE DCL4 but fitted with an Audible data monitor. 
ORDER ASDCL4 Price £18. 50 



** FAST MAIL ORDER SERVICE. ALL PRICES FULLY INCLUSIVE 
* PLUS 10 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE ON ALL BACKUP DEVICES 



fin/L 



Cheaper prices to callers to our shop at 329 Tong Street, Bradford 4 
Please phone first to check availability. 
Payment accepted by Cash. Cheque. PO. Money Order. Bankers Draft. Transcash. \:-3T 
(For Transcash order and pay at any Post Office, our account no. is 650 3659.) ▼/ 

Exports. Please add £1.00 payment in sterling only please. 

29 HOLME LANE, BRADFORI 
BD4 0QA. Tel. 0274 684289 



miLOGIC 

F 



TRI LOGI C De pt 102 

AccesspP^j 




NEW — 80 COLUMN INTERFACES FOR COMMODORE 128 ' 



111 

o 

Q 
O 



THE l-CON RANGE ■*• ONLY FROM TRILOGlC - GIVES YOU 

• Full 128 Compatibility 

• All 16Colours 

• 40/80 Column Switch Fitted (where applicable) 

• Computer Audio Output via TV 

• Just Plug-in and Switch-on 

• Available for most TVs with RGB input 

TRILOGlC HAVE DONE THE IMPOSSIBLE AGAIN! 

An l-CON Interface will transform your TV into a fully 128 compatible RGBI Colour 
Monitor. Indeed, you can expect remarkably good results — almost professional 
monitor quality in fact — depending upon the resolution of your TV. 

Types available — If your TV is not listed (must have RGB input), please enquire 
(enclose 7 7p stamp). 

• l-CON 1 for Ferguson TX range MC01 & MC05 etc. 

• l-CON 2 for Hitachi & Gnnada rental sets with RGB input 

• l-CON 3 for Fidelity CTM1400 & CM14. 

• l-CON 4 for most TVs with Scart Euro Socket (state model when ordering). 
ALL TYPES £27.95 inc VAT & postage. 

Leads with 40/80 Column Switch also available for most monochrome monitors. 
Prices from £9.95. 



** FAST CBM 64 REPAIRS ' 



Standard Service including parts, labour, postage, VAT £27.50 

Express Service as above but return of post service £34.50 

Replacement CBM 64 Power Packs £29.50 

Please state faults. The above prices cover electrical parts; replacement 
keyboard, case, pcb or power supply extra. 



FREE CATALOGUE, Please send 17p stamp 



DAAT .CtinNNFD 



THE ULTIMATE POOLS PREDICTION PROGRAM 

• MASSIVE DATABASE Poolswinner is a sophisticated Pools 
prediction aid. It comes complete with the largest database 
available - 22000 matches over 10 years. The database updates 
automatically as results come in. 

• PREDICTS Not just SCOREDRAWS, but AW AYS, HOMES 
and NO SCORES. 

• SUCCESSFUL SELEC guarantee that Poolswinner performs 
significantly better than chance. 

• ADAPTABLE Probabilities are given on every fixture - 
choose as many selections as you need for your bet. The 
precise prediction formula can be set by the user - you can 
develop and test your own unique method. 

• SIMPLE DATA ENTRY All team names are in the program. Simply type in the reference 
numbers from the screen. Or use FTXGEN to produce fixture list automatically (see below). 
DISC/MICRODRIVE COMPATIBLE Tapes supplied with conversion instructions. 
PRINTER SUPPORT Full hard copy printout of data if you have a printer. 

PRICE £15.00 (all inclusive) 




Boxed, with detailed 
instruction booklet 




FLXGEN86/7 



AT LAST: No more struggling for hours to get the 
fixture list into the computer. FLXGEN has been 
programmed with all English and Scottish fixtures 
for 1986/7. Simply type in the date, and the full fixture list is generated in 
seconds. Fully compatible with Poolswinner. Yearly updates available. 
POOLSWINNER with FLXGEN £16.50 (for both) 



COURSEWINNERvs 



NOT JUST A TIPSTER 
PROGRAM, Coursewinner 
V3 can be used by experts 
THE PUNTERS COMPUTER PROGRAM and ^ ^jo^i pun ters alike, 
I You can develop and test your own unique winning system by adjusting the 
analysis formula, or use the program in simple mode. Coursewinner V3 uses 
statistical analysis of major factors including past form, speed ratings, course 
statistics, prize money, weight, going, trainer and jockey form etc, etc. It 
outputs most likely winners, good long odds bets, forecasts, tricasts etc. The 
database includes vital course statistics for all British courses. You can update 
the database - never goes out of date. 

PRICE £15.00 (all inclusive) includes Flat AND National Hunt versions. 



ALL PROGRAMS AVAILABLE FOR: AMSTRAD CPCs, AMSTRAD PC Ws (ADD £3.00), All BBCs, All SPECTRUMS, 

COMMODORE 64/128, ATARI (48K> ), SINCLAIR QL. 

Supplied on tape (simple conversion to disc) - except PCW (on 3" disc) and QL (on microdrive) 



BE 



Send Cheques/POs for return of post service to . 



phone 24 hrs SOFTWARE phone 24 hrs 

37 COUNCILLOR LANE, CHEADLE,' CHESHIRE. S 061-428 7425 

(Send for full iisi of our software) 



H 




Cz. commodore 



Despite the Commodore 128D price rises, you'll find our prices are still 
the keenest! And there are plenty of software bargains for you below, 
with some of our prices at an all time low. VlzaWrlte Classic Is still our 
No.1 best seller, so we're holding our special offer open a little longer! 



I Commodore 128D computer £484.95 I 
I 128D plus 1900M monitor £579.95 I 
I Commodore 128 Compendium £279.95 I 
I Commodore 1571 disk drive £254.95 I 
I 128D Business System (128D ♦ 1900M * 
I year guarantee on all Commodore products 
Please add £5 for delivery (3-day) 



1 1901C monitor 40/80 colour £279.95 
1 1900M monitor 40/80 mono £139.95 
I MPS 1000 NLQ printer £269.95 
I DPS 1101 Daisy Wheel printer £279.95 
MPS 1000 ♦ Mlcroclerk) £874.95 
. Prices subject to availability. VAT included, 
or £10 for Datapost overnight 



VIZAWRITE 

VlzaWrlte Classic 128 is a much enhanced successor to the 

best-selling VizaWrite 64, which THE TIMES featured in three 

articles, calling it 'a creative writer's dream!' VlzaWrlte Classic 

is certainly the best wordprocessor we've yet seen on any 

computer, everl Written specially for the 128, VlzaWrlte Classic 

makes maximum use of the speed, memory and 80-column 

display, showing your document exactly as It will be printed... 

with a 30,000 word disk dictionary, massive 55K text area, proportional printer support 

plus built-in NLQ fonts for CBM/Epson type printers, easy-to-use 'p ull ~down' menus, 

full function calculator, 'newspaper style' columns, mall merge... and much, much more! 

FANTASTIC SUMMER SAVINGS ON ALL VIZA PRODUCTS! 




■ VlzaWrlte 'Classic' 128 j*ss £76.95 ■ VlzaStar 128 


t^fttfS 


£96.95 


■ VlzaWrlte 64 'Professional' s*tS £49, ss ■ VlzaStar 64 XL8 


9>flfS 


£76.95 


■ VlzaWrlte 64 (cartridge) ejief £69.95 ■ VlzaStar 64 XL4 


Ta^S" 


£66.95 


Please note both versions of VizaWrite 64 now include VizaSpe 


on disk 





VIZASTAR 




The information processor... spreadsheet, database and graphics: 
the most powerful integrated system yet for the Commodore 128! 
The latest design techniques provide the ultimate in ease-of-use 
with all the sophistication of a fully Integrated product... VlzaStar's 
advanced spreadsheet includes high speed maths formulae, date 
functions, lookup tables, enormous 60K worksheet (1000 by 64), 
programmability, windows, cell protection, fast search and sort, text editing, wordprocessor 
merge, variable column widths... PLUS a built-in database with split-second access, up to 
8K record size, 9 screens per record, unlimited file size, 16 files per database, full support 
for data exporting, reporting and selection... PLUS displayed or printed hl-res graphics, 
automatically scaled, with 2-D, 3-D, bar & line graphs, colour pie charts... and much more! 



Turn your Commodore computer into a professional data 
management system, with SuperBase... the most powerful 
database ever produced for 8-bit computers! SuperBase 
has everything you need, whether you're beginner or expert... 
menu-driven and program control, calculator and calendar functions, 
easy access to word processor or data files, sorting and searching, superfast 
data retrieval, fully definable report and screen formats.., Superbase is essential if you 
want the most from your computer! Supplied with excellent tutorial and reference manual. 

BEST EVER SUPERBASE PRICES! 




I SuperBase 64 & Plus/4 
I SuperBase 128 



t>?5 £44.95 ■ SuperBase Starter 64 3>*S £19.95 
9>gg" £64.95 M SuperBase: The Book £11.95 



Tricks & Tips for the 128 

A 300-page treasure chest of easy-to-use 

practical techniques for your C128... packed 

with ready-to-enter BASIC and Assembler 

listings, carefully explained, and full of useful 

Ideas for you to tryl You'll see how to run 

64 programs at 128 speed, how to work with 

graphics and multiple screens... You'll see 

how to alter the character set, print or display 

banner titles, add extra function keys, 

protect and restore your programs, redefine 

the keyboard, add new Basic commands 

and much more... all for only £12.951 



The Anatomy of the 128 

With nearly 500 Information-packed pages, 

this Is THE book to get about your new 

Commodore 128... the Insider's guide 

to the secret3 of this powerful computer! 

Fully documented ROM listings of both Basic 

and the Kernal... memory maps.,, zero-page 

listings... ports, interrupts, boot routines... 

SID, VIC, Z80 & 80-column chips... n*)mory 

management... assembly code... enlarging 

the screen ... 640 x 200 graphics... all this 

and much more for only £12.951 

(Also at £12.95, The Anatomy of the 1571) 



SELECTED S( 


DFTWARE FOR YOUR COMMODORE 128 




■ Superscript 128 


The intelligent word processor tor your 128 


8>sS 


£67.95 


■ Script 128 


As Superscript 128, without the speller 




49.95 


■ Sage Accounts 


includes Sales, Purchase & Nominal Ledgers 




99.95 


■ Sage Accounts Plus 


As above, plus Invoicing & Stock records 




99.95 


■ Sage Payroll 


Handles all UK tax codes and Nl tables 




69.95 


■ MlcroClerk 128 


All-in-one business system from Commodore 




99.95 


■ PetSpeed 128 


The Basic 128 compiler, from Oxford 


43^S 


44.95 


■ Oxford Pascal 128 


The definitive Pascal for the 128 


49-SS 


44.95 


■ 128/Parallel Interface 


Interface for Centronics/Parallel type printers 


29.95 


■ 128/RS232 Interface 


RS232 Serial printer interface 




29.95 


■ 128/IEEE Interface 


Run IEEE disks & printers from your 128! 




79.95 


■ Matrix 128 


Run 64 programs on your 128 - in 128 mode! 




49.95 



MORE SOFTWARE BARGAINS FOR YOUR COMMODORE 64 



Superscript 64 
SuperType 64 
SuperType 64 (tape) 
Print Shop 64 
Simon's Basic 64 
PetSpeed 64 
Oxford Pascal 64 
Oxford Pascal 64 (tape) 
JetPack 64 (tape) 
Practlcalc II 
Master 64 



The intelligent wordprocessor for your 64 6>^§ £47.95 

Professional touch-typing keyboard trainer 2&& 17.95 

Touch-typing trainer as above, on tape t£fc3$ 16.95 

Be your own printer, publisher and editor! 44.95 

Programmer's cartridge from Commodore 50*06 35.00 

The standard 64 Basic compiler from Oxford M»c6 34.95 

The complete J & W Pascal for your 64 4>^S 42.95 

Pascal for 64 tape users 22^0* 19.95 

Basic 64 compiler for tape users 14.95 

Half price stock clearance - only a few left! 63*5$ 34.95 

Do-it-yourself database for programmers 69^00 39.00 



WANT IT TOMORROW??? CALL US TODAY!!! ON 01-546-7256 



Prices Include VAT and POSTAGE 
and are correct on going to press. 
Order by post or phone, using 
cheque, Access, Barclay/Visa or 
postal order. Despatch Is by same 
day 1st CLASS post Product data 
available on request, or phone for 
advice If In doubt [REF A42] 



LAKESIDE HOUSE, KINGSTON HILL, SURREY, KT2 7QT. 




TEL 01-546-7256 









IT'S PREVIEW TIME! 



UCHI-MATA 

We've got an early version of Uchi- 
Mata. It looks like one of the best 
game of the year. Something that will 
grab you right through the autumn 
with the need to get back to it time 
and time again. 

Uchi-Mata is an accurate simula- 
tion of Judo, and makes a nice 
change from "kick'n slay" type mar- 
tial arts games. Unlike Way of the 
Exploding Fist and similar games, 
this game actually requires clever 
strategy and skill. You have to con- 
stantly look at your opponent's posi- 
tion, his feet, and his grip. 



By looking at these, you can antici- 



high, then youmay not be able to get 



back. The foot display then changes 
to display a referee awarding points. 
If you manage to lay out your oppo- 
nent on his back, you get full points, 
and for partial flooring, a smaller 
score. 

Uchi-Mata, especially in two player 
mode, requires intense concentra- 
tion. You have to watch the grip 
meter, the foot display, and your 
opponent on the screen, so rather 
than just going in to kill by kickingas 
fast as you can, Uchi-Mata requires 
that you watch every move, and cal- 
culate what you are going to do next. 

The graphics are also very good, 
with excellent animation. Apparently, 
the programmers watched judo videos 
for hours to be able to design the 
animation frames correctly. If you 
want to do more than just get boredof 
kick jab kick, start quewing now. 
Uchi-Mata is awesome! 



SSI 






TRAILBLAZER FROM 
GREMLIN 

John Wayne and Randolph Scott 
. . . POW! No this isn't the game of 
a Wild West f Urn . . . 



treme. What is this weird creat- 



tf^r 



W 



y&& 



animated ball it is too . . . rotat- 



barriers, so don't fall . . . 

Phew! Back to earth after that 
brain-bending description! Trail- 
blazer is a rather strange game, 
and it is difficult to classify it, so 
I'll just say that it's a pangalactic, 
interstellar, mindwarping, gar- 
gleblaster of a game! You can 
either practice, compete against 
the computer, or play against 
another player, which is, as 
usual, the most fun. The ball is 
speeded up and slowed down by 
respectively pushing forward and 
pulling back on the stick. Press- 
ing fire repeatedly causes the 
ball to bounce higher and high- 
er, enabling it to leap with 
bounds of boing the hazards in 
its path. Speed strips, slow strips, 
and obstacles all stand in your 
way, and scattered along the 
road are holes and rifts which if 
you run over, you'll run through 
plummeting to the abbys beyond! 

Although technically very nice, 
with fast scrolling smooth anim- 
ation, and a very nice ball (you 
and your balls-Ed) the game itself 
does get a bit tedious after a 
while. But just when you've swom 
you've played it for the last time. 
20 minutes later you'll be back at 
the joystick, guaranteed! A well 
implemented game, and certain- 
ly nicely coded! This game will 
certainly get your peripherals 
bouncing! 



JACK THE NIPPER 
FROM GREMLIN 

Jack the Nipper, converted from 
the Spectrum where it enjoyed a 
good reception has finally made 
its debut on the Commodore 64. 
The game involves controlling a 
rather malicious little brat called 
Jack whose sole intent and 
purpose in life seems to be to 
cause as much chaos, destruct- 
ion and despair as possible in his 
town. 

Jack runs around in his nappy, 
giving a malicious, toothless grin 



tf|6Htf 



to***** 



course, he can't leave without his 
pea-shooter which makes 
people's faces turn purple with 
rage when they're hit! Avoid the 
ghosts, which can be shot and 
vanquished with the pea-shooter. 

Around the town are fourteen 
different nasty things Jack can 
do. He can enter the 
flower-centre, pinch the weedkill- 
er, and kill all the plants in the 
garden. Then sprinkle the now 
devastated garden with fertiliser 
and start a trifid farm! Alternativ- 
ely, he could take the glue from 
the launderette, go to the false 
teeth factory, and ruin the mach- 
inery, causing the manager to go 
purple with rage and chase you 
out. If you ate caught, then you 
get a severe spanking, and the 
rash-meter goes up! Once it 
reaches the end, you forfeit a 
Jack, and once your Jacks run 
out, that's the game over. 

Jack the Nipper is what can be 
described as 'cute'. It features 
good graphics (even though they 
are very Spectrumushroomy in 
design), and a nice, simple 
sound track. To discover what to 
do with what, and where to find it 
takes a while, so it could almost 
be called an adventure. Highly 
recommended. 



lilllll 



power cartridge 



evesham freeze frame 



final cartridge I 



Note: 

these are trade ins, but fully 
guaranteed by H & P for 
6 months. 

Availability is dependent on trade 

ins we receive. 

We will keep your check for 10 

days and return it without 

charge if the product is not 

available. 





obcom 



copyright and registered trademark 

H&P computers 

Wolphaertsbochi 236 3083 MV Rotterdam 

Netherlands 

Tel 01031 ■ 104231982 Telex 26401 a intx 



New: the famous German turbo nibbler on 

disk version 1 .4 for£ 20.- 

Backs up everything. Only for experts! 

Send your check + £ 2.- for postage and handling to 
U.K. ORDERS 



H & P Computers 

9 Hornbeamwalk 

Witham Essex CM8 2 SZ England 

Telephone: 0376 - 51 14 71. 




I.C.P.U.G. 

the Independent Commodore 
Products Users Group 

is the largest and most friendly 
Computer Club in the country. 

* Over 70 local groups with regular meetings 

* Superb Newsletter — 80 plus pages of reviews, 
news and information every two months 

* Free Software Library 

* Help and Advice 



24 disks of public domain Amiga software 
(verified by ICPUG's Mike Todd) available to 
members on supply of disk and payment of p&p. 

* Discount Scheme 

* We support all Commodore Machines old and 
new: PET, VIC20, 64, 1 6, +4, 1 28 and Amiga . . . 

* Subscription only £1 per year (U.K.) 

If you are seriously interested in using or 
programming any Commodore computer, then 
joining ICPUG is a must! 

For full details, send a stamped, addressed envelope to: 
ICPUG Membership Secretary, 
Jack B. Cohen, 

W30, Brancaster Road, 
Newbury Park, 
1 ILFORD, 

Essex. IG2 7EP 



1 



EDUCATION 

DISKS/CASSETTES 
All 1 986 releases 



Phone 010-353- 
61-27994 

C64/128 



AGE 12-16 

BIOLOGY 1, BIOLOGY 2, PHYSICS 1. CHEMISTRY 3 

DISKS £9.95 EACH — "EXCELLENT VALUE" 

AGE12-ADULT 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, MAPWORK, SOCIAL/ECONOMIC. WEATHER/CLIMATE 

ORDNANCE SURVEY/EARTH (read our excellent reviews) 

DISKS £9.95 EACH 

AGE 10-15 

BETTER SPELLING, BETTER MATHS 1 - "MARKET LEADERS" 

DISKS £9.95 EACH 



CASSETTES £8.95 



SOFTWARE LTD. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY SEND CHEQUE/PO/VISA 

TO 

School Software Ltd Meadowvale Estate Raheen 

Limerick Ireland 

Tel (UK) 01 0/353/61 /279S4. IRI 061 /27994 

AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE 



If an advertisement 

is wrong we're here 

to put it right. 



If you see an advertisement in the press, in print, 
on posters or in the cinema which you find 
unacceptable, write to us at the address below. 



The Advertising Standards Authority. 



/ 



ASA Ltd. Dept 3 Brook House, Tomngton Place, London WC1E 7HN 



C128 BANKER 



This is a small (41 byte) Machine code 
programme to help make use of some of 
the 1 28's extra memory by use of one of 
its inbuilt (Kernal) routines. The pro- 
gramme was originally written to allow 
the user to store hi-res pictures in the 
extra bank of memory (bank 1 ) and then 
to retrieve them from within a basic or 
machine code programme. Using this 
technique it is possible to have several 
screen shots in memory at once, all of 
which can be viewed by means of a SYS 
call. 

Listing 1 — Type in and save. Lines 
100-120 read in the machine code and 
poke it into the cassette buffer. The pro- 
gramme is relocatable so if you are 
already using the buffer you can store it 
somewhere else by changing the value 
of 'L' in line 100. Line 140 see Listing 2. 
Line 150 turns on and clears the hi-res 
screen. Lines 160-170 Draw a box with 
the words 'PRESS ANY KEY' in the cen- 
tre. Line 180 waits for the user to press 
any key. Line 190 calls the machine 
code routine which in turn copies the 
area 8192 to 16384 in bank 1 into the 
hi-res screen in bank 0. As we have not 
put anything into bank 1 yet, all we 
would see would be the screen fill with 
rubbish. This rubbish is whatever was in 
bank 1 . Line 200 holds this display for 2 
seconds and then turns off the hi-res 
mode and ends. Lines 220-240 contain 
the data forthe machine code. Run List- 
ing 1. 



LISTING 1 



How can we tell that the rubbish we 
saw on the screen actually came from 
bank 1? Try this simple experiment. 
Enter the built in monitor by either 
pressing F8 or typing and entering 
'MONITOR'. Now type *F 12000 14000 
01' and RETURN. All you will see is the 
cursor disappear for a few seconds and 
then return. Now type 'X' and return. We 
are now back in BASIC. Now to explain 
what we just did. Lets break down the 
command we entered. F — 1 —2000 — 1 
— 4000 — 01. The 'F tells the monitor 
that we want to FILL an area of memory 
with something, the '1 ' before the '2000' 
and '4000' is the bank number wherethe 
memory to be filled lives. The '2000' and 
'4000' is the start and end address of the 
memory in hex. (8192 — 16384 in 
Decimal). The '0T is the value with 
which we want to fill the memory. We 
therefore filled memory 81 92 to 16384 in 
bank 1 with Vs. Run listing 1 again. Now 
when we press a key the screen fills with 
vertical lines instead of rubbish. 

Listing 2 — This listing will only be of 
use to disc drive owners. Type in and 
save. Line 10 turns on and clears the 
hi-res screen. Line 20-30 draws a box 
with 'SCREEN TWO' in its centre. Line 
40 saves this hi-res screen to disc, it will 
use up 33 blocks so make sure you have 
enough room on your disc before run- 
ning. Line 50 turns off the hi-res mode 
and prints the 'Finished' message. Run 
listing 2. 



REM 

1 REM * 

2 REM * 
REM * 



v y y if y v if y y y y y y v y if y y vv if y y y v v y y y ^ 

BANKER FOR THE COMMODORE 128 
IAN BENNETT 09/08/86 



yyyy yy 



Remove the REM from line 140 in list- 
ing 1 and then run. When you type run 
this time you may notice that the disc 
drive bursts into life. This is caused by 
line 140 which loads in the screen that 
listing 2 created and saved as a pro- 
gramme. This it does using the BLOAD 
command. Ifyou look at line 140 you see 
it comprises of the programme name 
followed by B1.P8192. The B1 simply 
means Bank 1 while the P8192 tells the 
computer where in bank 1 to start load- 
ing it. In our case 81 92 (2000 hex). So we 
have just loaded a picture into bank 1. 
Now when you press a key you will see 
that the machine code routine has 
copied the 'SCREEN TWO' from bank 1 
into our hi-res screen in bank 0. 

This routine is not just limied to mov- 
ing hi-res screens. It will move any block 
of memory from any bank. Listed below 
are some pokes which if used with the 
programme in the cassette buffer will 
allow you to alter the default parame- 
ters. It should be fairly simple to expand 
on this routine and make it more flexi- 
ble. Happy hacking . . . 
Poke 2819, Input-block 

Start address of input memory/256 
Poke 2823, Output-block 

Start address of output memory/256 
Poke 2833, Bank-read 

Number of bank to be read 0-15 
Poke 2851, Qty 

Last address of output memory/256 
Ian Bennett 



ANY KEY" 

X7\J 919 £OLO 

200 SLEEP 2: GRAPHIC O 

210 : 

220 DATA 160,000,169,032,133,252,169,032,133,254,169,000,133,251,133 

230 DATA 253,162,001,169,251,032,116,255,145,253,200,208,244,230,252 

240 DATA 230,254,165,254,201,064,240,002,208,232,096 



86 Commodore Computing November 1986 



LISTING 2 

10 GRAPHIC 1,1 

20 BOX 1,10,10,310,190 

30 CHAR 1,14, 10, "SCREEN TWO" 

40 BSAVE" SCREEN TWO" ,B0,P8192 TO PI 6384 

50 GRAPHIC 0: PRINT "FINISHED" 

MACHINE CODE LISTING FOR DEFAULT PROGRAMME. 

AS IT STANDS WITHOUT POKING ANY NEW VALUES IN 
IT WILL COPY THE AREA 8192 TO 16384 IN BANK 1 
TO THE HI -RES SCREEN IN THE DEFAULT BANK 



OOBOO 


AO 


00 


LDY 


£*00 


00B02 


A9 


20 


LDA 


£$20 


00B04 


85 


FC 


STA 


*FC 


00B06 


A9 


20 


LDA 


£*20 


00B08 


85 


FE 


STA 


*FE 


OOBOA 


A9 


00 


LDA 


£*00 


OOBOC 


85 


FB 


STA 


*FB 


OOBOE 


85 


FD 


STA 


*FD 


00B10 


A2 


00 


LDX 


£$00 


00B12 


A9 


FB 


LDA 


£*FB 


00B14 


20 


74 


FF JSR 


*FF74 


00B17 


91 


FD 


STA 


(*FD),Y 


00B19 


C8 




I NY 




00B1A 


DO 


F4 


BNE 


SOB 10 


00B1C 


E6 


FC 


INC 


*FC 


00B1E 


E6 


FE 


INC 


*FE 


00B20 


A5 


FE 


LDA 


*FE 


00B22 


C9 


40 


CMP 


£*40 


00B24 


FO 


02 


BEQ 


*0B28 


00B26 


DO 


E8 


BNE 


$0B10 


00B28 


60 




RTS 





LSB OF READ ADDRESS 

MSB - IS POKED TO SELECT INPUT BLOCK 
ZERO PAGE ADDRESS - MSB FOR INPUT 
MSB - IS POKED TO SELECT OUTPUT BLOCK 
ZERO PAGE ADDRESS - MSB FOR OUTPUT 
LSB - OF INPUT AND OUTPUT BLOCK 
ZERO PAGE ADDRESS - LSB FOR INPUT 
ZERO PAGE ADDRESS - LSB FOR OUTPUT 
POKED WITH MEMORY BANK TO BE READ 

KERNAL ROUTINE - INDFET (FETCH) 
STORE DATA 'FETCHED' INTO OUTPUT BLK 



HAVE WE COPIED 2K YET? 
YES - THEN END 
NO - THEN GET SOME MORE 
RETURN TO BASIC PROGRAMME 



BLOCK SAVE C64 

This program, from Tom Nuttal, will save any block of memory to disk or tape with the 
filename of your choice. As it stands the program saves to disk. If you wish to save to 
tape then change the poke in line 1015 to poke 781,1. 

The block can then be loaded with Load "filename", dv,1 where dv is either 8 for disk 
or 1 for tape. 

This is suitable for inclusion in a Basic programme as a subroutine. Line 20 contains 
the Start and End addresses of the block in the variables S & E. 

20 S=1024:E=2047:G0SUB1000:END 

1000 REM SAVE MEMORY FROM S TO E TO DISK 

1005 INPUT"FILENAME";F* 

1010 A=LEN(F*) :FORI=1TOA:POKE827+I, ASC(MID*(F*, I, 1) ) : NEXT 

1015 P0KE780, 1 : P0KE781 , 8: P0KE782, 255: SYS65466 

1 020 P0KE780, A: P0KE781 , 60: P0KE782, 3: SYS65469 

1030 P0KE252,INT(S/256J : P0KE251 , S-256*PEEK<252) 

1040 P0KE782,INT(E/256):P0KE781,E-256*PEEK(782) 

1050 POKE780, 251 :SYS65496: RETURN 

READY. 



Commodore Computing November 1986 87 



PRINTER ENHANCER 



C64/C128 



Duncan Anderson has sent us a C64 & 
C128 program for an alternative print 
style for the much criticised 801 and 803 
printers. It is rather large at just under 
400 lines but we think it will have 
considerable appeal to printer users. 

The listing contains a large number of 
data statments but these should only 
affect the type style and not crash the 
program 



■;; itv, p:. ■ q| t/j-v-; eniV^flCeCl prifll Sl^'iO f 



..J..- ■..-...■ 



t ]'"*.' Qi list l; : 



ana r 



'■■7 available 

Notice that the letters now have true descenders, 
iortional spacing (ie. ii takes up less room than ww). Thi:; 

was "printed out on an MPS SOI printer, but also works on other 

Commodore dot-matrix printers (eg. MPS #0.3). Not only is the 

print quality enhanced, but you can also : 

1) Produce UND ERLIN ED text. 

2) Produce EMPHASISED text. 

Vi Produce UNDERLINED Sk EMPHASISED text. 



I should imagine that there is quite a 
large number of C64 users, who have 
recently bought the Peripheral Pack in 
order to enhance the abilities of their 
computers. If you are in this group, then 
you will probably have been disppointed 
to find that the printer included (either 
MPS-801, or MPS-803), does not have 
descenders. This leads to the unsightly 
effect of the p's, q's and g's sticking up 
above other letters. Although you could 
probably put up with this yourself, if you 
wish to use the computer for wordpro- 
cessing, it is not really acceptable. So, it 
was with this though in mind, that this 
program was written. Not only does it 
provide the user with descenders, but 
the whole print style has been com- 
pletely redesigned, providing an output 
not dissimilar to that produced from an 
Apple Mac. I am sure, that although the 
program is quite long, you will appre- 
ciate the considerable improvement in 
print quality provided by it. 
. By utilising the graphics mode of the 
printer, I have been able to produce the 
required effects. In order that the rede- 
fined text could have a stylish appear- 
ance, each line of text, now takes up 
about one and a half times that before. 
However, as we all know, you don't get 
something for nothing, and by using the 
graphics mode the speed of printing 
coupled with the fact that the file needs 
to be processed in BASIC, become very 
slow. This means that you will probably 
not want to use this print mechanism all 



the time, but for important letters, or any 
document which requires a professional 
appearance, it can come in very handy. 

The program has been written, so that 
it will take standard RSCII sequential 
files off a disk, and print them onto the 
printer. Since the program is primarily 
intended for wordprocessing, the pro- 
gram performs word-wrapping, in order 
that words are not split in half at the end 
of aline. Furthermore, the printer is now 
able to perform proportional spacing, ie 
it takes up less room than ww. This 
again, creates a better appearance. 

However, if you use Easy Script (as an 
overwhelming majority C64 users do), 
then a number of the commonly used 
commands are recognised by the pro- 
gram. These include right, and left mar- 
gins (the character numbers are the 
same as for normal print, not the new 
redefined print size — forease), centred 
text, and forced page breaks. The prin- 
ter now has the same print styles as the 
8300, in appendix C of the manual. 
Thus, underlined text can be achieved 
by enclosing the text with F1/[ and F1/] 
(ASCII 169,m and 223). Bold text can 
also be achieved (not possible on nor- 
mal output from the MPS-801 , and MPS- 
803), by enclosing the text in F1/„ and 
F1/: (ASCII 188, and 190). 

Although the program is best used 
with Easy Script, there is no reason why 
it can not be used with any word pro- 
cessed file. It should be a relatively sim- 



ple procedure to alter the commands 
which Easy Script uses, to the ones used 
by your particular word processor. 

Commodore printers usually use a 
6x7 dot matrix to form their characters, 
and the printer automatically advances 
the paper a few pixels more, so that 
there is a small gap between lines. When 
the graphic mode is usd, each vertical 
line of seven pixels is defined by a cha- 
racte code sent from the computer, but 
the printer no longer advances the 
paper to produce a gap between lines. 
Luckily, this adds up to exactly fourteen 
pixels — the equivalent of two normal 
characters (no accident!). Thus, by 
using exactly two sets of data sent to 
define each character, we do not have to 
get involved in complex shifting opera- 
tions to define the characters. However, 
we do not get half the normal number of 
lines on a page, since the printer is no 
longer advancing the paper so much (as 
we are in graphic mode) — instead of 66 
lines, we get 45 lines, so the amount of 
text that can be reproduced on one page 
is still quite large. 

To use the program, type it in as listed, 
and then save it on disk or tape. Once 
this is done, you can run the program, 
and type in the name of the file to be 
printed out. It may take a little time for 
the first line to appear, so give it a 
chance to process the text, and you 
should soon be producing professional 
quality output! 



a 



88 Commodore Computing November 1986 



10 rem ******************************** 
20 rem *##* char set for **** 
30 rem **** cbm printers ##*# 
40 rem **** (c) d.anderson **** 

50 rem **#*#*****♦********•**#********** 

51 poke 53280, 3: poke 53281,1: rem set screen colours 
60 data 166, 63, 134, 20, 164, 64, 132, 21 : rem m/c data 

70 data 32, 19, 166, 56, 165, 95,233, 1 , 133: rem m/c data 

80 data 65, 165, 96,233,0, 133,66, 96: rem m/c data 

81 -for a=49152 to 49152+25: rem set up restore to line-number m/c 

82 : read b:poke a,b 

83 next 

100 po=0:wi=0:print"H"Schr*(14> ;chr*(ll) i :rm=480: lm=0 

110 gosub 50000 

120 open 1 , 8,4, f i le*+" , seq, r" : open 15,8,15 

130 dim bo(490) ,tp(490) ,ct(490) ,cb(490> 

140 open 2,4: pr int#2, chr*(8> ;chr*<13> ichr*< 13) ! 

145 rem do 

150 : get«l,aS:ch=asc(a*> 

160 : if (ch<32) or (ch>122 and ch<193) or (ch>218) then gosub 40600:goto 150 

170 : poke 63, (ch*100) and 255:rem set line number for restore 

180 : poke 64, int ( (ch#100) /256) :rem set line number for restore 

190 : sys 49152:rem restore to line number as above 

250 : la=.»:read a 

255 : if a=-l then goto 300: rem do while a<>-l 

270 : if db=0 then tp(po)=a 

275 : if db=l then tp(po)=a or la 

280 : widt=widt+l: po=po+l 

235 : la=a:read a 

290 : goto 255: rem loop 

300 : b=0:count=0 

305 : if db=l then tp tpo) =128: bo (po) =128: po=po+l : wi=wi+l 

306 : if db=l and ul=l then bo(po-l>=136 

307 : lb=b:read b 

310 : if b=-l then goto 350:rem do while b<>-l 
330 : bo( (po-widt) +count)=b 

335 : if db=l then bo( (po-wi ) +co)=bo < (po-wi ) +co) or lb 

336 : if ul=l then bo( (po-wi ) +co)=bo( (po-wi ) +co) or 8 

337 : co=co+l 

338 : lb=b:read b 
340 : goto 310:rem loop 
350 : widt=0 

360 : if po>=rm then gosub 40000: gosub 40400: gosub 40200 

380 : a=128:b=128 

500 if st=0 then goto 145: rem until st 

514 print 

520 input#15, a,b*,c,d: print a;b*jcid: c lose 15 

525 close 1 : pr int#2:close 2 

530 end 

3200 data 128, 128, 128, 128, -1 : rem *** space *** 

3250 data 128,128,128,128,-1 

3300 data 128, 190, 128, -1 : rem *** ! *** 

3350 data 128,130,128,-1 

3400 data 128, 131 , 128, 128, 128, 131 , 128, -1 : rem *** n *** 

3450 data 128,128,128,128,128,128,128,-1 

3500 data 200, 255, 200, 200, 255, 200, 128, -1 : rem *** # *** 

3550 data 128,131,128,128,131,128,128,-1 

3600 data 204, 146, 255, 146, 228, 128, -1 : rem *** * *** 

3650 data 128,129,131,129,128,128,-1 

3700 data 131 , 227, 144, 140, 131 , 128, -1 : rem *** % *** 

3750 data 131,128,128,131,131,128,-1 

3800 data 238, 145, 145, 174, 192, 160, 128, 128, -1 : rem *** k *** 

3850 data 129,130,130,129,128,129,130,128,-1 

3900 data 128, 131 , 128, -1 : rem *** ' *** 

3950 data 128,128,128,-1 

4000 data 248, 134, 129, 128, -1 : rem *** ( *** 

4050 data 128,131,132,128,-1 

4100 data 129, 134, 248, 128, -1 : rem *** ) *** 

4150 data 132,131,128,128,-1 

4200 data 146, 212, 184, 212, 146, 128, -1 : rem *** * *** 

4250 data 129,128,128,128,129,128,-1 

4300 data 144, 144, 254, 144, 144, 128, -1 : rem *** + *** 

4350 data 128,128,129,128,128,128,-1 

4400 data 128, 128, 128, -1 : rem *** , #** 

4450 data 136,134,128,-1 

4500 data 144, 144, 144, 144, 144, 144, 128, -1 : rem *** - *#* 

4550 data 128,128,128,128,128,128,128,-1 

4600 data 128, 128, 128, 128, -1 : rem *** . *** 

4650 data 128,131,131,128,-1 

4700 data 128, 192, 176, 140, 131 , 128, -1 : rem *** / *** 

4750 data 134,129,128,128,128,128,-1 

4800 data 252, 130, 129, 129, 130, 252, 128, -1 : rem *** *** 

4850 data 128,129,130,130,129,128,128,-1 

4900 data 130, 255, 128, 128, -1 : rem *** 1 *** 

4950 data 130,131,130,128,-1 

5000 data 130, 193, 161, 145, 142, 128, -l:rem *** 2 *** 

5050 data 131,130,130,130,131,128,-1 

5100 data 128, 130, 145, 153, 166, 192, 128, -1 : rem *** 3 *** 

5150 data 132,136,136,136,132,131,128,-1 

5200 data 176, 168, 164, 242, 160, 128, -1 : rem *** 4 *** 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 89 



(PKtfton, 



5250 data 


128, 128,130,131,130,128,-1 






5300 data 


158, 146,146, 146, 164, 192, 128, -l:rem *** 5 *** 






5350 data 


136,136,136,132,130,129,128,-1 






5400 data 


252, 146, 137, 137, 144,224, 128, -l:rem *** 6 *** 






5450 data 


128,129,130,130,129,128,128,-1 






5500 data 


131, 129, 225, 153, 135, 128,-1: rem *** 7 *** 






5550 data 


128,131,128,128,128,128,-1 






5600 data 


192, 172, 146, 146,172, 192, 128, -l:rem *** 8 *** 






5650 data 


129, 130,132,132,130,129,128,-1 






5700 data 


140,146, 161,161, 146, 252, 128, -l:rem *** 9 *** 






5750 data 


128, 128,130,130,129,128,128,-1 






5800 data 


128, 128, 196, 196, 128,128, 128, -l:rem *** : *** 






5850 data 


128, 128, 128,128, 128,128,128,-1 






5900 data 


128, 128, 136, 128,-1: rem *** i *** 






5950 data 


128, 136, 134,128,-1 






6000 data 


144, 168,196,130, 129, 129, 128, -l:rem *** < *** 






6050 data 


128, 128, 128,129, 130,130,128,-1 






6100 data 


128, 200, 200, 200, 200, 200, 200, 128, -l:rem *** = *** 






6150 data 


128, 200, 200, 200, 200, 200, 200, 128, -1 






6200 data 


129, 129,130,196, 168,144, 128,-1: rem *** > *** 






6250 data 


130,130,129,128,128,128,128,-1 






6300 data 


130,129,177,145, 142, 128, -l:rem *** ? *** 






6350 data 


128, 128, 130,128,128,128,-1 






'6400 data 


254, 129,185, 197,197, 197, 249, 129, 254, 128, -l:rem *** @ *** 






6450 data 


129,130,130,130,130,130, 128,129,128,128,-1 






6455 rem ********* lower case ********* 






6500 data 


200, 164, 164, 148,248,128, 128, -llrem *** a *** 






6550 data 


129, 130,130, 130, 129,130,128,-1 






6600 data 


130,255, 136, 132, 132, 136,240, 128, -l:rem *** b *** 






6650 data 


128, 131,129,130, 130,129,128,128,-1 






6700 data 


240, 136, 132, 132, 136, 128, -l:rem #** c *** 






6750 data 


128,129, 130,130, 129,128,-1 






6800 data 


240,136, 132,132,137,255, 128, 128, -l:rem *** d *** 






6850 data 


128, 129, 130,130, 129, 131,129,128,-1 






6900 data 


240, 168, 164, 164,168,176, 128,-1 :rem *** e *** 






6950 data 


128, 129,130, 130,130, 129, 128,-1 






7000 data 


132,254, 133, 129, 128, -l:rem *** f *** 






7050 data 


130, 131,130, 128, 128,-1 






7100 data 


176,200,200,200,200,176, 136, 128, -l:rem *** g *** 






7150 data 


141,146, 146, 146,146,140,128,128,-1 






7200 data 


130,255, 144, 136, 136, 240, 128, 128, -l:rem *** h *** 






7250 data 


130, 131,130, 128,130,131, 130, 128,-1 






7300 data 


144,250, 128, 128,-1: rem *** i *** 






7350 data 


130,131, 130,128,-1 






7400 data 


136, 253, 128,-1: rem *** j *** 






7450 data 


144, 143, 128,-1 






7500 data 


130,255, 160,208.140,132, 128. 128. -1: rem *** k *** 






7550 data 


130,131, 130,128, 131,130,130,128,-1 






7600 data 


130,255, 128, 128, -l:rem *** 1 *** 






7650 data 


130,131,130, 128,-1 






7700 data 


136,252, 136,132, 132,248, 136, 132, 132, 248, 128, 128, -l:rem *** m *** 




7750 data 


130,131,130,128,130,131,130,128,130,131,130,128,-1 






7800 data 


136,252,136, 132, 132, 248, 128, 128, -l:rem *** n *** 






7850 data 


130,131,130,128, 130,131,130,128,-1 






7900 data 


240, 136, 132, 132, 136, 240, 128, -l:rem *** □ *** 






7950 data 


128, 129, 130,130,129,128,128,-1 






8000 data 


132,252,132, 132, 132, 136,240, 128, -l:rem *** p *** 






8050 data 


144,159,129,130,130,129,128,128,-1 






8100 data 


240, 136, 132, 132, 132,252,132, 128, -l:rem *** q *** 






8150 data 


128,129,130,130,129,159,144,128,-1 






8200 data 


136,252, 136,132,132, 128,-1: rem *** r *** 






8250 data 


130,131,130,128,128,128,-1 






8300 data 


152, 164,164, 164,200, 128, -Urern *#* s *** 






8350 data 


129,130,130,130,129,128,-1 






8400 data 


132,255, 132, 128,128, 128, -l:rem t *** 






8450 data 


128, 129,130, 130, 129,128,-1 






8500 data 


132, 252, 128, 128, 132, 252, 128, 128, -l:rem *** u *** 






8550 data 


128, 129, 130, 130, 130, 129, 130, 128, -1 






8600 data 


132, 156,228, 128,228, 156, 132, 128,-1: rem *** v *** 






8650 data 


128,128,128,131,128,128,128,128,-1 






8700 data 


132, 156, 228, 128, 224, 152, 224, 128, 228, 156, 132, 128, -l:rem *** w *** 




8750 data 


128, 128, 128, 131 , 128, 128, 128, 131 , 128, 128, 128, 128, -1 






8800 data 


132, 140, 212, 160, 212, 140, 132, 128, -l:rem *** x *** 






8850 data 


130,131,130,128,130,131,130,128,-1 






8900 data 


132, 156, 228, 128, 228, 156, 132, 128, -l:rem *** y *#* 






8950 data 


144,136,132,131,128,128,128,128,-1 






9000 data 


140,196, 164, 148, 140, 128,-1: rem *** z *** 






9050 data 


131,130,130,130,131,128,-1 






9100 data 


144,238, 129, 129, 128, -l:rem *** C *** 






9150 data 


128, 129, 130, 130, 128,-1 






9200 data 


144,254, 145,130,128, 192, 128, -l:rem *** £ *** 






9250 data 


130,131,130,130,130,129, 128,-1 






9300 data 


129,129,238,144, 128,-1: rem *** ] #** 






9350 data 


130,130,129,128,128,-1 






10100 rem 


******* upper case ******** 






19300 data 128, 192, 176, 172, 163, 172, 176, 192, 128, 128, -1 :rem *** a *** 






19350 data 130,131,130,128,128,128,130,131,130,128,-1 






19400 data 129,255, 137, 137, 137, 150,224, 128, -1 : rem *** b *** 






19450 data 130,131,130,130,130,129,128,128,-1 






19500 data- 252, 130, 129, 129, 129, 130, 128,-1: rem *** c *** 







90 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



19550 
19600 
19650 
19700 
19750 
19800 
19850 
19900 
19950 
20000 
20050 
20100 
20150 
20200 
20250 
20300 
20350 
20400 
20450 
20500 
20550 
20600 
20650 
20700 
20750 
20800 
20850 
20900 
20950 
21000 
21050 
21100 
21150 
21200 
21250 
21300 
21350 
21400 
21450 
21500 
21550 
21600 
21650 
21700 
21750 
21800 
21850 

40000 
40010 
40020 
40025 
40030 
40035 
40040 
40050 
40055 
40060 
40065 
40070 
40080 
40090 
40100 
40110 
40112 
40115 
40130 
40200 
40210 
40220 
40230 
40240 
40250 
40270 
40280 
40290 
40400 
40410 
40420 
40425 
40431 
40432 

40433 
40436 
40437 
40439 
40440 
40450 
40460 
40465 



data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 
data 



128 


129 


130 


130, 


129 


255 


,129 


,129, 


130 


131 


130 


130, 


129 


255 


,145 


145, 


130 


131 


130 


130, 


129 


255 


,145 


145, 


130 


131 


130 


128, 


252 


130 


,129 


129, 


128 


129 


130 


130, 


129 


255 


145 


144, 


130 


131 


130 


128, 


129 


255 


129 


128, 


130 


131 


130 


128, 


128 


129 


255 


129, 


144 


144 


143 


128, 


129 


255 


145 


168, 


130 


131 


130 


128, 


129 


255 


129 


128, 


130, 


131 


130, 


130, 


129 


255 


135 


152, 


130, 


131, 


128, 


128, 


129, 


255 


131, 


140, 


130, 


131, 


130, 


128, 


252, 


130, 


129, 


129, 


128, 


129, 


130, 


130, 


129, 


255, 


161, 


161, 


130, 


131, 


130, 


128, 


252, 


130, 


129, 


129, 


128 


129 


130 


134, 


129 


255 


153 


169, 


130 


131 


130 


128, 


134 


137 


145 


161, 


131 


130 


130 


130, 


131 


129 


129 


255, 


128, 


128 


130, 


131, 


129 


255 


129 


128, 


128, 


128 


129, 


130, 


129, 


135 


153 


224, 


128, 


128, 


128, 


128, 


129, 


135 


185, 


192, 


128, 


128, 


128, 


131, 


129, 


131, 


237, 


144, 


130, 


131, 


130, 


128, 


129, 


131, 


141, 


248, 


128, 


128, 


130, 


131, 


131, 


255, 


145, 


141, 


131, 


130, 


130, 


130, 



130, 129,128,-1 

129, 130,252, 128, 128, -l:rem *** d *** 

130,129,128,128,128,-1 

185, 131, 128, 128,-1: rem **# e *** 

130,131,128,128,-1 

185, 129, 131, 128,-1: rem *** f *** 

128,128,128,128,-1 

161,227, 160, 128,-1: rem ##* g *** 

130,129,128,128,-1 

145, 255, 129, 128,-1: rem *** h *** 

130,131,130,128,-1 

-l:rem *** i *** 

-1 

-l:rera *** j *** 
-1 

129, 128,-1: rem *** k *** 

130,128,-1 

128,-1: rem *** l *#* 

128,-1 

224, 152, 135,255, 129, 128, 128,-1: rem *** m *** 

128, 128, 128, 131, 130, 128, 128, -1 

255, 129, 128,-1: rem *** n #** 



128 
128 
197 
130 
128 
130 
224 
128 
176 
128 
129 
130 
161 
128 
129 
138 
201 
130 
195 
129 
129 
130 
128 
130 
128 
131 
185 
128 
237 
130 
141 
130 
131 
131 



131 
131 
128 
131 
128 
131 
129 
131 
130 
129 
146 
128 
130 
137 
134 
131 
128 
128 
129 
128 
129 
129 
224 
128 
135 
128 
131 
131 
131 
128 
128 
128 



o *** 



131,128,128,-1 

252, 128,-1: rem *** 

128,128,-1 

140, 128,-1: rem **» p *** 

128,128,-1 

252, 128,-1: rem *** q *** 

137,128,-1 

128, 128,-1: rem *** r *** 

130,128,-1 

-l:rem *** s *#* 

-1 

131, 128,-1: rem *** t **# 

128,128,-1 

255,129,128,-l:rem *** u *** 

128,128,128,-1 

153, 135, 129, 128,-1: rem *** v *** 

128,128,128,128,-1 

185, 192, 185, 135, 129, 128, -l:rem *** w *** 

128, 131 , 128, 128, 128, 128, -1 

129, 128,-1: rem *** x *** 

130,128,-1 

129, 128,-1: rem *** y *** 

128,128,-1 

-l:rem *** z *#* 

-1 



rem **************************** 
rem **** read back to space **** 
rem **************************** 
sp=0: a=po 
rem do 

a=a-l 

t=tp(a) :b=bo(a) 

if <<b=128> and <t=128)> then sp=sp + l 

if <Cb<>128> or <t<>128>> then sp=0 

if sp<>4 then goto 40110 
op=po: po=a 
for c=a to op 
ct (c-a)=tp(c) 
cb(c-a)=bo(c) 
next c 

rem end i-f 

i-f sp=4 and po>rm then sp=0 
i-f <<sp<>4> and (aOlm)) or (po>480) then goto 40030 
return 

rem **************************** 
rem **** put remainder back **** 
rem **************************** 
■for a=po+4 to op 
: tp(a-(po+4) +lm)=ct (a-po) 
: bo(a- (po+4) +lm) =cb (a-po) 
next 

po=op- (po+4) +lm 
return 

rem **************************** 
rem ********* output *********** 
rem **************************** 
i-f po< = lm then goto 40465 
: print«2,chr*(27) jchr*(16> ; 
: i-f lm>255 then pr int#2,chr*(l) ( 
: i-f lm<255 then pr int#2,chr*(0) i 
: i-f lm>255 then pr lnt#2,chr*< Im-255) ; 
: i-f lm<255 then pr int#2, chr*( lm) i 

: i-f cn=l then pr int#2,chr*(26) ;chr*( (480- (480-rm) -po) /2) ;chr*< 128) j 
: -for count = lm to (po-1) 
: print#2,chr*(tp(count) ) J 
: next count 
rem end if 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 91 



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CHARTPAK 

For C-64 or C-128 

CHARTPAK lets you make professional quality charts fast— without any time-consuming 
programming. Enter, edit, save and recall your data, then interactively build your pie. bar. 
line chart or scatter graph. You specify scaling, labeling and positioning. CHARTPAK 
instantly draws the chart in any of 8 different formats— you can change your format 
immediately 10 draw another chart type. Other features include statistical routines for 
average standard deviation, least squares and forecasting. You can also use data from 
spreadsheets such as Multiplan, Calc Result or Busicalc. CHARTPAK records your final 
results on Commodore 1525 / MPS-801/1526, Epson. Gemini. Okidata (including 
OKIMATE 10/color) or C Itoh Prowriter dot matrix printers. 

C-64 version £24.95 
C-128 version £34.95 

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ADAMSOFT (Deptcci ), 18 Norwich Avenue, Rochdale, Lanes OL11 SJZ 
Tel: 0706-524304 (anytime) 



/P/*c#t<mj 



40470 print#2,chrS<13) s 



40474 

40475 

40476 

40477 

40478 

40479 

40480 

40490 

40500 

40510 

40515 

40520 

40521 

40522 

40523 

40524 

40525 

40526 

40527 

40530 

40600 

40610 

40620 

40630 

40640 

40650 

40660 

40670 

40680 

40690 

40700 

40710 

40720 

40730 

40740 

40800 

40810 

40820 

40830 

40840 

40845 

40850 

40860 

40862 

40865 

40870 

40880 

40890 

40900 

40910 

40920 

40930 

40940 

40950 

40960 

40970 

40980 

40990 

50000 

50010 

50020 

50021 

50022 

50023 

50024 

50030 

50040 

50050 

50060 

50070 

50071 

50075 

50080 

60000 

60001 

60002 

60003 

60010 

center 

60015 

60020 

center 

60025 

60027 

60030 

60032 

60033 

60040 

60050 



if po< = lro then goto 40515 

print#2,chr*(27) ;chr*<16> ; 

if lm>255 then pri nt#2 J chr*(l ) ; 

i-f lm<255 then pr int«2,chr* (0) ; 

if lm>255 then pr i nt*2,chr*( lm-255) j 

if lm<255 then pr int#2, chr* ( lm) ; 

if cn=l then print»2, chr*<26> Ichrtl (480- (480-rm) -po) /2) ;chr*( 128) ! 

for count=lm to (po-1) 

print#2,chr*(bo (count) ) ; 

next count 
rem end if 
print#2,chr$(13> ; 
li=li+l 

if li<>45 then goto 40527 

: print#2,chr*(13) ;chr*(13) ; :pa=pa+l: if pn=l then gosub 40800 
: if pnOl then pr intt*2,chr*(13> Jchr*( 13) ichr*(13) j chr* ( 13) ; 
: li=0:close 2:input z* 

: open 2,4:print#2,chrS(8> ;chr*(13) ;chr*(13) ! 
rem end if 
return 

rem **************************** 
rem ****** special chars ******* 
rem **************************** 
if asc(a*)=188 then ul=l 
if asc(a*)=190 then ul=0 
if asc(a*)=169 then db=l : a=128:b=128 
if asc (a*) =223 then db=0 
if asc(a*)=13 then gosub 40400: po=lm 
if asc(a*)<>128 then goto 40730:rem begin 
: if asc(a*)=13 then goto 40720 
: get#l,aS:co*=co*+a* 
: goto 40690 
: gosub 60000 
rem end if 
return 

rem *****##********************* 
rem ******* number page ******** 
rem **************************** 
pa*="-- PAGE "+str*(pa> +" — " : pp=po: po=lm 
for z=l to len(pa*) 
wi=0:co=0 
a*=mid*(paS, z, 1 ) 

poke 63, (asc (a*)#100> and 255:rem set line number for restore 
poke 64, int ( (asc (a*)*100> /256) : rem set line number for restore 

sv5 49152: rem restore to line number as above 
read a 

if a=-l then goto 40920 
tp ( po) =a: wi =wi +1 : po=po + l 
read a 
goto 40880 
read a 

if a=-l then goto 40970 
bo ( (po-wi ) +co) =a 
read a:co=co+l 
goto 40930 
next 

cn=l: gosub 40400: cn=0: pr int#2, chr* ( 13) i chr* (13) i :wi=0:po=pp 
return 

rem **********************###*** 
rem ******** initialise ******** 
rem *************************x*$. 

print " PRINTOUT FOR COMMODORE PRINTERS" 
print " — i' 



'(C) D. Anderson 1986" 
' if i le* 



print: print spc (10) ; ' 

pri nt : pr i nt 

input "Name of file ' 

pr int : pr int 

prinf'Page numbering (Y/N) "s 

get a*: if a*="" then 50060 

if a*="y" or a*="Y" then pn=l 

if a*<>"y" and a*<>"Y" then pn=0 

print:print: print "+Please wait 8" 

return 

rem *************************.*## 
rem *** easy script command *** 
rem *** (f3) *** 

rem ***********#***#*********##* 

if lef t*(co*,4)="*cnl" or lef t* (co*,4) ="*CN1 » then cn=l : co*=" ": return: rem 
i ng on 

if left*(co*,4)="*cn0" or lef t* (co*,4) ="*CN0" then cn=0: co*=» ": return: rem 
ing off 

rem *** set left margin *** 

if lef t*(co*,3X>"*lm" and lef t* Ico*, 3) <>"*LM" then goto 60070 

: if asc (midSfco*, 4) ) =32 then d=5 

: if asc (mid*(co*,4) ) <>32 then d=4 

: l*=mid*(co*,d, 1 ) 

: r*=mid*(co*,d+l , 1 ) 



Commodore Computing November 1986 93 



60055 
60060 
60065 
60070 
60075 
60077 
60080 

60082 
60083 
60090 
60100 
60105 
60110 
60120 
60130 
60135 
60140 
60150 
60151 
60160 
60170 
60180 
60190 
60200 
60210 
60220 
60230 
60232 
60233 
60234 
60235 
60236 
60240 
60250 
60260 
60270 
60280 
60282 
60283 
60284 
60285 
60286 
60290 
60295 
60300 
61030 

ready. 



: if asc(r*)<=57 and asc (rS) >=48 then lm=6*< val ( l*)*10+val (rS) ) 
: i-f asc(r*)>57 or asc(r*)<48 then lm=6#val(lS) 
: po=lm 
rem end if 

rem *## set right margin *** 

i-f lef tS(co*,3)<>"*rm" and le-f Ulcot, 3) <>"#RM" then goto 60120 

: if asc<mid$(co*,4) )=32 then d=5 

: if asc(midS<co*,4> ><>32 then d=4 

: l*=mid*(coS,d, 1) 

: rS=midS(co*,d+l , 1 ) 

: if asc(rS)<=57 and asc(r*)>=48 then rm=6* ( val ( l*)*10+val (r-S) ) 

: if asc(r*>>57 or asc(r*><48 then rm=6*val(]*> 

rem end if 



rem *■*# forced page br 
if lef tS(co*,3K>"#f p" 
if mid$(coS,4, l)=ch 
if mid*(co*,4, DOc 
l*=mid*(co*,d,l) 
i-S=midS(coS,d + l , 1 ) 
if asc(r*)>57 or as 
if asc(r*)<=57 and 
if fp<>0 or li<0 th 
for a=l to (45-1 i 
print#2,chrS(13 
next 

printtt2,chrS(13> i 

if pn=l then gosu 

if pn<>l then pri 

close 2: 1 i=0: pr i n 

open 2,4:print#2, 

rem end if 

if f p<0 or- ( (45-1 i ) 

for a=l to (45-1 i 

print#2,chr*<13 

next 

print«2,chrS<13> 
if pn=l then gosu 
if pn<>l then pri 
close 2: 1 i =0: pr i n 
open 2,4:print#2, 
rem end if 
po=lm 
rem 
coS=" " : return 



eak ### 

and left*(co*,3X>"*FP" then goto 60295 
r*<32) then d=5 
hr*(32) then d=4 



c(r*)<48 then fp=val(lS) 

asc(r$>>=48 then f p=10*val ( IS) +val (r*) 

en goto 60240 

>#2 

) ; 

chr*(13) i : pa=pa+l 

b 40800 

nt#2,chr*(13);chr*(13);chr$(13)ichr*(13)j 

t "H" i : input z* 

chr*(8) !chr*(13) ;chr*(13) i 

>fp) then goto 60290 

)*2 

) i 

chr*( 13) i : pa=pa+l 

b 40800 

nt#2,chr*(13) JchrS(13) ichr*(13) ichr*(13) ! 

t "H" i : input z* 

chr-S(8) ;chr«(13) ;chr*(13) ; 



ATTENTION ALL 
PROGRAMMERS!! 

Y ou may be an experienced programmer- you may be a beginner. Either way, you may have 
come across some useful tips which could make life easier for other CCI readers. 

Or maybe you have written a program, either in Basic or assembly language, that you feel is worthy 
of publication. 

CCI always welcomes contributions from readers. We will publish any suitable listings or 
programming advice. . .and we'll pay you for it! 

If you wish to contribute something for publication, we require programs on cassette or disk, 
together with any additional explanatory information and a CLEAR printout of any listings. (The better 
the original printout, the better the reproduction in the magazine.) 

Please enclose a SAE if you wish to have your program returned to you. Please package disks or 
cassettes carefully! 

The address to send contributions to is: 
The Editor, 

Commodore Computing International, 
Finsbury Business Centre, 
40 Bowling Green Lane, 
London EC1 RONE 

Don't forget... CCI welcomes programs for all Commodore computers - 64, Plus/4, C16, 128 plus 
the VIC and PET. 



94 Commodore Computing November 1 986 



CBM 64 AND 128 • TRANSFER ALL MAJOR TURBOS • AUTOMATIC • NO USER KNOWLEDGE 



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thicknesses including Quills. 

* Paint Brush can use all 16 colours and 8 
brightnesses to give 128 colour shades. 

* Geometric shapes — circles, boxes, lines, triangles 
& banding. * Dynamic rubber banding. (Plus/4 only). 

* Colour fill any area any colour (choice of 11 
patterns on Plus/4). 

* Pixel accuracy * Save screen to tape/disk. 

* AND ... a printer dump routine built in; and there's 
more too numerous to mention here. 



C64/128 MODEL ALSO AVAILABLE -£17.95 



GET ONE from COMPUTER CUPBOARD 

FREEP0ST, London W5 1BR. 

Pleasesupply Trojan light pen(s)for Plus/4&C16 @ £19.95 

(inc p&p UK). Overseas orders add £1.50. 

Name 

Address 

CO 1 1/86 (Trade enquiries welcome) 



AUTHORITATIVE • DEFINITIVE •COMPREHENSIVE 

Books and Software for the 




Anatomy 
of the 
C-128 

£12.95 



Presents 

operating system 
details and 
explains the 
graphics, chips, 
memory man- 
agement unit 
and commented 
listings of Kernal. 



The 4-part C 
compiler 
comprising; 
easy-to-use 
Editor, 6502 
machine 
language 
compiler, linker 
and disk manager. Plus comp- 
rehensive manual and SYSTEM 
Guide. 




Presenting the 
Amiga 

£9.95 



A compre- 
hensive, interest- 
ing and invalu- 
able look at this 
new and exciting 
hardware. A 
must for every 
first-time user or 
potential user. 



Anatomy 

of the 

1571 DD 

£12.95 



Covers 

sequential and 
relative files, 
direct access 
commands; 
describes 
important DOS 
routines plus 
provides fully commented DOS 
listings and much more. 



Super Pascal 
£49.95 



Editor Compiler 

and extensions - 

which include 

Highspeed DOS, 

debugging & 

monitor aids, 

graphics 

procedure & 

functions and a full built-in 

assembler- plus comprehensive 

manual. 

'~f The world's 



C-128 
Tricks and Tips 

£12.95 



Get more from 
your C-128. 
Greater 
character sets, 
user C-128 FAST 
mode, user ROM 
routines -full of 
practical infor- 



mation and many sample 
programs. 



Basic Compiler 



£49.95 



Compiles in 
superfast 
machine code or 
compact P-code 
-or mix of the 
two; compile a 
series of pro- 
grams using 
overlay; use any language exten- 
sion-plus comprehensive 
manual. 



\<* 



*V> 



&' 



dBASE II 
for the 
C-128 

£119 



standard data- 
base. Powerful, 
easy and with all 
the documen- 
tation and 
applications you 
could ever wish 
to buy. 



SO 1 



o<* 



dBASE II 
Tricks and Tips 

£14.95 



FIRST PUBLISHING LTD 

Unit 20B, Horseshoe Road, Horseshoe Park, Pangbourne, 
Berkshire RG8 7SW Tel: 07357 5244 Tx: 848854 



Written to 
supplement, not 
replace, the 
dBASE II manual. 
Information 
invaluable to the 
dBASE novice 
and experienced 



programmer alike. Packed with 
samples & suggestions for all 
types of usage. 



Please send me 



.copies 

copies 

.copies 



TOTAL 
D Cheque □ Postal Order □ Credit Card 

Name 

Address 



Post Code 



Tel no. 



Access/Visa Card No. 
Expiry Date 



Data Becker Books and Software from 




FIRST PUBLISHING LTD 

FIRST SOFTWARE LTD 





Desperately Seeking September 
'85 CCI to complete my collection. 
Also need May & Jan/Feb 85. Write 
to S.J.G.39B Ossian Rd, London 
N4. 



ELECTRICAL 
CONTRACTORS 



Comply with the 1 5th edition 
with my cable sizing program 
for the CBM 64/1 28. Design 
current, capacity, volt drop, 
shock protection, CPC size 
with volt drop adjustment 
and simultaneous overload 
(appendix 9) now with PF 
correction optional output to 
printer £8.95 on turbo load 
cassette. 
Cheque/P.Q. to: 

TONY SPRY 

13 Tudor Drive, Barnstable, 

Devon 

Tel: 0271 77550 



C64/128 user wants penpals all over the 
world. Exchange tips, ideas, informa- 
tion and programs. Write to, Kare Pet- 
tersson, Halymanen 23, S-245 00 Staf- 
fanstorp, Sweden. All letters answered. 
Disk friends wanted on Commodore 64 
and Amiga from all overthe world. Write 
to, Francesco Billari, Via Clovasso 4, 
20121 Milano, Italy. 

C64 users, I have programs to swap. If 
you're interested, write to, Itamar Elha- 
nany, Marshall plein 178, Rijswijk, The 
Hague, Holland. 

CBM64, C2N, speech 64, Two Joys- 
ticks, Mags, Music Maker, plus lots of 
games worth £400, cost £800 sell £240 
ono. Tel: 01-723-6107 or 01-267-7856. 
Summer Games, (l/ll). Pitstop II, 4th 
Protocol Sherlock, Emerald Isle. Snow- 
ball, Mercenary, Forth+, Machine Code 
Tutor. All originals £45. Phone Andrew. 
021-554-6025. 

64, Start SG-10C, Modem, Disk Drive for 
Sale, Offers? Tel: 01-361-4746 or write 
to Paul Benham, 26 St. James Avenue, 
London N20 0JT. 

MPS803 — 4 months old. Spare ribbon. 
Owner wants to upgrade to NLQ. £100. 
Phone Ian 09592 2838 (Evens) (Nr. 
Sevenoaks). 

CBM 3022 Printer was working but has 
component fault on main circuit board. 
Mechanically sound. Must be worth £45 
to somebody. Tel: (0244) 675717. 
CBM64 owners. Make yourtape think its 
a disk. Reliable utility loads, saves and 
verifies at ten times normal speed. 
Cheques for £4.95 to G Moss, 472 
Spring Road, Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 5LE. 
Mouse and 1520 printer/plotter for 



CBM64. £30 each. For details Andy, 40 
Haddington Road, Beaumont Park, 
Whitley Bay, NE25 9UY. 
C64 owner wants to swap programs 
over the world. Disk only. Send list to, 
Eivind Antonsen, Tulipanvn 34, 1475 
Finstadjoroet, Norway. 
C64. Your basic programs compiled in 
to machine code. £3.00. Tape & Printout 
of basic program. Max 12K, tape only. 
U.D.G. grids. U.D.Gs £1.00 =60. C64/128 
Printouts £1 .00. Stuart Bassett, 1 Brook- 
side, Rearsby, Leicester. Tel: (9774) 852. 
Want to connect/teletype 43 printer to a 
64 and/or +4 - What do I require? W 
Halford, 4 North Common, Weybridge, 
Surrey. 

C64 originals for sale at cut prices. Send 
for full list of titles. Some titles free with 
others. Sean O'Kane, 72 Hampstead 
Park, L'Derry, N.Ireland BT48 7RY. 
Wanted C64 penpals. Cass only. Write 
to, Ken Filler, Flat One, Rhodfa'R Ysgol, 
Llandysul, Dyfed, Wales SA44 9VV. 

CBM64 Poke sheet issue 4. Pokes + 
Cheats on Kung Fu Master, Finders 
Keepers, Starquake, Int. Karate & much 
more. Send 30p + SAE to, S Moore, 68 
Lightridge Road, Fixby, Hudds. 
CBM 128 £200, fast 1570diskdrive£150, 
CBM 1701 monitor £150, all boxed as 
new except monitor C2N unit £20. Stack 
light pen £8.00. Tel: (0795) 79492 after 6. 
pm. Refer Mark. 

Swap. Norwegian boy would like to 
swap games on tape. Send list to: Vidar 
Mortensen, 9713 Russenes, Norway. 
Home software and games for C64. 
Exchange and sell from 50p to £10. Last 
news from the U.S.A. Bardetti Massimo, 
via G. Veroi, N.30, 20070 Castelnuovo 
B.A. (Milan), Italy. 

Wanted. 1541 disk drive, will pay £80. 
Tel: Kenny on (0698) 458180. can collect 
up to 80 miles radius from Hamilton. 
Exchange VIC20 +4 + cartridge games + 
super expander + 12 games + power 
supply for Plus/4. Tel: 884207 after 7 pm 
ask for Jim. 

CMB64 owner would like penpals to 
swap software etc, write to Brian Sears, 
7 St. Botolphs Road, Northfleet, Kent. 
Exchange complete modern HF ama- 
teur radio station with CBM64 RTTY, for 
CBM128 with disk drive and monitor. 
Collect/Deliver up to 50 miles. Phone 
Mereside (073129) 403. 
VIC20 hardly used. With or without 
powersupply. Games cartridge. Cheaper 
than repair cost. Maximum offer £22. 
Good home needed. Offers to Riley 
04302-3017. 

Wanted Plus/4 and cassette unit must 
be in perfect working order. Phone after 
7 pm 884207 or write Caretakers House, 



Wrotham School, Borough Green Road, 
Sevenoaks, Kent. 

CBM64 + 1541 disc drive and over£1 000 
worth of original software for £500 ono. 
Will sell separate. Tel: 051-336-1711 
after 7 pm. 

MPS 801 printer brand new. Still boxed, 
genuine unwanted item purchased in a 
disk drive/printer pack. Suitable for 
CBM64 or 128. £95 ono. Tel: Cardiff 
(0222)691174. 

C64 tapes to swap or sell. Steve Davis, 
Highnoon, Cofuzion, Cybrotron, Kong 
Computer, Little People, Munch-Mania 
etc and other games. Norman, Tel: 
Chelmsford (0245) 83215. 
CBM64 Poke sheet issue 3. Pokes on 
Paradroid, Kung Fu, Master, Hunch- 
back, BMX Racers and much more. 
Send 30p + SAE to: S Moore, 68 Ligh- 
tridge Road, Fixby, Huddersfield HD2 
2HS. 

CBM64, 1541, Drive and MT80 printer 
with interface, boxed as new with soft- 
ware, manuals and joystick. £400 ono. 
Tel: 01-654-7738, Evenings. 
CBM64 with C2N Cassette unit plus 
DPS1101 Daisy Wheel printer plus 
Nordcraft Cartridge plus speech syn- 
thesis cartridge plus numerous games. 
£295. Tel: Jerry, 01-254-3016. 
Help, I need the Plus/4 programmer's 
reference guide, can you help? Tel: 
Skegness 68711. 

Plus/4 with cassette, joystick and 15 
games £120 ono. Tel: R Milton, 01-319- 
1062 also VIC20 any offer considered. 
Exchange my 480 channel CB Rig for 
CBM64 printer or disk drive or modem 
plus comms software. Tel: 021-744-6287 
(Eve) 021-772-6981 (Day) 
CBM64, as new, plus 1531 datasette 
plus over £200 worth of software includ- 
ing Uridium, Hardball, Game Killer, Cur- 
rah Speech etc. All for £275 ono. Tel: 
01-882-5999. 

Commodore 16 capital cities quiz with 
personal printout orders for £3. Daniel 
Corby, 3 Goulton Road, Broomfield, 
Chelmsford, Essex. First Class Despatch. 
Sale or swap. C64and CBM monitor will 
sell for £225 or swap with cash for CBM 
SX64 portable. Any offer considered call 
0204 694407, after 6 pm or weekends. 
CNET modem with s/ware £30. Makro 
assembler cartridge£10. CBM assembler 
package £10. All in V.G.C. £45 the lot. 
Tel: 051-423-5493, between 6 pm - 7 pm. 
CBM64 games Chartbusters and Fistful 
of Fun, 5 games on each cassette, both 
£6 or each £3.50. Also Havoc £2.50. Teh 
01-886-8876. 

CBM64 software for sale. Mercenery 
£5.00 Elite £5.00. Back to the future 
£5.00 and many other games. Vizawrite 



Commodore Computing November 1 986 97 



64 for £25.00. Ring Keighley (0535) 
664319 after 7.30 pm and ask for 
AKHTAR. 

CBM MPS 801 printer for sale £80 also 
MPS 802 (NL2) printer for sale £150.00. 
Tel: 0602-846743. After 6.30 pm. 
Australian 64'er wants to swap or sell 
programs. Have many programs on disk 
and cassette. Send disks or lists to: 
David Gee, 90 Hargreaves St, Bendigo, 
Victoria, 3550, Australia. 
CBM64 modem plus 12 months com- 
punet subscription. Unused. £75 easys- 
cript and 6 games £15. Tel: Chorley 
62826 after 6 pm. 

Swap C2N datasette CBM Musicmaker 
and Designers pencil for any 5 of Elite 
Skyfox, KoronisRift, Winter games, The 
Eidocon, Rambo, Supersonic, V, Silent 
Service, Paperboy or cash offers. 
Electricians cable and power factor 
selector program for commodore 64 on 
cassette £8.95. Tel: 0271 77550 after 6 
pm. 

CBM64 or C16+4 users interested in 
Horse Racing who wishes to corres- 
pond SAE for quick reply: Brian Nobile, 
28 Benarty Avenue, Crosshill, Fife, Sco- 
tland KY5 8AZ. 

NEPA USA Trades. Over 3000 titles. 
Write to Ted Patterson, 145 Ramsey 
Avenue, Keansburg, N.J. 07734 USA. 
C64 starter pack, still two months under 
guarantee + joystick and 36 originals 
including S.F's strip poker, G.A.C etc. 
worth £480, sell for £160 o.n.o. (phone 
after 5 pm) Tel. Stanton St. John 681 
Plus 4 and C16 games for sale also help 
and map for mercenary second city 
send s.a.e. for details Mark Thacker, 9 
Summerlea Road, Leicester, LE5 2GF 
Latest C64 disk software wanted, to 
swap with blank disks, write to: Hazman, 
53 Jalan Gasing, 4600 Petaling, Jaya, 
Malaysia. Tel. 03-7923-123 originals 
preferred. 

Greek CBM-64 owner wants penpal 
write to: Dimitri Chalkias, Kefallinias 
102str., Athens GR-112 51, Greece. 
Also, I would like t swap games for 128 
with C-64 games from 1350 titles. 
Commodore Communications Modem 
as new £55. 0908 582300 
Sell Lord of the Rings (Book Instruction 
booklet, 2 cassettes) for £8 also the 
"Doubler" backup board + tape for £4 
Jordan McClements, 19 Newcastle Road, 
Portaferry, Co. Down, BT22 1QQ 
CBM 64 Pen-Pals wanted to exchange 
games mainly. Write to: Itamar Elhana- 
ny, Marshall plein 178, Rijswijk, Holland. 
Wanted friends who have a C64 and are 
age 16 or 15. 1 would prefer people who 
live in the London area. If interested 
please phone Nick on 455-2586. 



"Easy File" (disk) C64. Unused. Perils all 
offers considered Telephone (0382) 
542200 after 6 pm. 

VIC 20 games forsale including perils of 
willy, jump, jet, skyhawk, Matrix £1 
each. Write to Christopher Mungall, 33 
Kilnburn, Newport, Scotland DD6 8DE, 
for full list. 

"Pet Column 80 for sale needs data 
recorder write to 41 Broadway, Greasby, 
Wirral, Merseyside, L49 2NQ". 
Wanted C.C.I back issue! March 86, will 
pay £1 .50p for it. Send for details to:- Mr 
A.R. Jones 8 Lovell Place, Rotherhithe, 
London, SE16 1QQ. 
C64 Penpals wanted with D/Drive or 
cassette to swap info., tips, progs. 
Please write Paul 37 Oakfield Road, 
Bromborough, Wirral Merseyside. 
Free Plastic library case when you buy 
10 DS/00 discs £10.00 inclusive suitable 
C.B.M. cheques P/orders to P. Mangham, 
6 Lincoln Street, York, Y02 4YR. 



CBM-64, Modem, 1541, Mouse, Track- 
ball, C2N Cassette, utilities, software, 
final cartridge, all boxed. Tel: 0786- 
823791 , will split, (also SX-64) MPS-801 
Printer, games, ask Shaun Tel 
0786-823791 

VIC-20 ALL THE BEST ARE among the 
48 progs. I'm selling £35 (inc. p&p). 
don't believe me? phone now 0558 
822509 

Vic-20 owners! amazing bargain 48 VIC 
programs for ony £35 (inc. P.&P.) will 
split if necess. Phone Mick 0558 822509 
(quick). 

Apple compatible to swap with Amstrad 
6128 package includes monitor and 
drive, CP/M and 80-Col, plus software 
Hazman, 53 Jalan Gasing, 46000 Petal- 
ing Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia. 
VIC-20 bargains 48 progs, for a mere 
£35 (inc. P.&P.) will split phone now 
0558 822509. 



CBM 64 PRINTER 

(VIC1525) with manual and Word Processor 
£70 o.n.o. 

Franklin, 11 Fairway, Bramhall, Ches. SK7 1DB. 
Tel: 061-439 3000 



HERE'S MY CLASSIFIED AD. 



(Private Readers - Free-Max 32 words) 
Trade Advertisements - 40p per word 



I make this. 



.words at p per word, so I enclose £. 



Please continue on a separate sheet of paper for trade advertisements 
j Name 




Teh J 

Send your classified entries to: 
Classified Department, 
Commodore Computing international Magazine, 
40 Bowling Green Lane, London EC1R ONE 
Tel: 01-278 0333 Ext.280 



98 Commodore Computing November 1986 




El eady to perform! Street Styler is Skyway's first complete full-on Freestyle Bike! Frame and Fork are 100% 4 130 chrome-moly with special features including heat-treated 
1 frame drop-outs, creased top tube platform, slot-through coaster brake mount, reinforced caliper brake hole and spiral fluted fork stem. Street Styler, equipped with 
m Skyway's OF Wheel, F-Z Bar, Hot Seat, Tuff Pads and Freestyle Stem with brake-through system, is available in 3 stylin ' color combos; pink with white, white with 
lavender and green with white. Look for the new Street Styler and other Skyway Freestyle products in your local bike shops. Ride safe. Always wear Safety Fquipment. 
CPSC equipment included but not shown. Components subject to change without notice. SKYWAY; WF BUILD FM BETTER, 445 1 Caterpillar Boad, Bedding, CA 96003. 



// 



US. Top Seller is British 



ff 



CBM64 

40 + ao 
c o/umn , 
Versions 



The Essential Package 

Over there they call it Swift-Calc; over here ! 
we just call it Swift, but whatever you call 
it, it's the most affordable and easy-to-use 
professional quality Spreadsheet around! 

The Americans have voted with their 
wallets and made Swift one of the top ten 
Home Management programs, according 
to the highly respected Billboard chart. But 
it's British, written by Dave Middleton of 
Metamorphosis Developments, and 
published in the UK by Audiogenic 
Software. 

Swift Spreadsheet is the essential financial 
modelling package. Use it in business, at 
home, or in your club or society to help you 
in budgetting, costing, quotations, 
household financial planning, or any task 
where the manipulation of figures is 
involved. 

Swift will prove indispensable in 
forecasting and decision-making due to its 
What If capabilities - it can show you 
instantly how results are affected when you 
change one or more of the contributory 
factors. 

Even if you haven't used a Spreadsheet 
before, you will soon be able to harness 
the power of Swift to your own special 
requirements. 



^ 



§S$&. 



PEBF6 CT 





WHAT THE REVIEWERS SAY 

Companies are spending thousands of pounds on 
micros running Lotus 1-2-3. ..home users have access to 
similar powerful programs like Audiogenic's Swift 
Spreadsheet" The Guardian 

"This product is so outstanding in so many ways" 
( ommodore Horizons 

"Audiogenic's Swift Spreadsheet is far and away the 
best of the low-cost spreadsheets for home micros" 
Sunderland Echo 

VERSIONS AVAILABLE 

Commodore 128 and 64 - both versions on one disk 
Commodore 128 and 64 - both versions on one cassette 
Atari 800XL and 130XE - both versions on one disk 
Atari 800XL and 130XE - both versions on one cassette 
BBC-B (40 Column screen display) - EPROM 



w 



K 



Swift is the Trade Mark of 
Metamorphosis Developments Ltd. 
Now available from... 
WH Smith, Boots, Laskys and all 
aood software dealers 




Best Value Package 

EVer at £24.95 IBBC version £29.95) 
ONLY SWIFT CAN GIVE YOU ALL THESE FEATURES... 

• Easy to use - With pop-up menu control. 

• Easy to learn - Comes with an instruction manual that is comprehensive and 
comprehensible. 

• Enormous Spreadsheet area- Cell matrices are Al to BL254 (Commodore 128 and 
Atari 130XE); Al to Z254 (Commodore 64 and Atari 800XL); or Al to Z126 (BBC-B). 

• Professional 80 column screen display- On Commodore 128 version only 
(RGB monitor required). 

• Highly flexible cell formatting - Column widths individually variable, user 
definable decimal precision, and text formatting to left, right or centre. 

• Lots of numerical display options - Minus signs, debit brackets or cr/dr notation 
for negative values, currency symbols, percent sign, etc. 

• Simultaneous display of two sheet areas - Horizontal or vertical split-screen facility 

• Graphical display option - Converts cell values into bar graphs. 

• Can be used by unskilled operators - Automatic execution of pre-programmed 
operational sequences. 

• BBC version supports both Tape and Disk filing systems - Comes as an EPROM chip 

• Commodore version gives easy interface to parallel printers - Built-in Centronics 
Interface. 

Order now by phone . . . (0734) 303663 

...or via Prestel to our Telex: 847826 AUDGEN G 

PO Box 88 Readina Berkshire RG7 4AA 




Am0WB 




tA sn 



Digital Solutions Inc. brings you 
the light with easy to use software 
specifically designed to use 
the power of your Commodore 
Amiga™. 

Announcing: 

U>D™ Writer 

LPD™ Planner 

U>D™ Filer 
Each of these programs give 
you all the functions you would 
expect from productivity soft- 
ware plus the following unique 
features: 

LPD™ Writer, LPD™ Planner and 
LPD™ Filer can run individually or 
together. When running together, 
information can be transferred 
from one application to another 
manually, or automatically using 
"links", a transfer procedure 
unique to LPD software. 

The software allows you to see 
all projects and applications 
through windowing. Each appli- 
cation can then be "zoomed" up 
to full screen size. You can 
execute a command by using the 
mouse, function keys or "short 
cut" command sequences. A 
"suspend" feature allows you to 
put away all applications you 
are currently working on and a 
"resume" command will restore 
the applications to the pre- 
suspended state. Also featured 
is on line memory resident help. 

In addition, LPD™Writer, 
LPD™ Planner and LPD™Filer each 
have their own very special 
characteristics. 



LPD™ WRfTER/Word Processor' 

multiple documents can be edited at the 

same time 
more than one window can be opened 

on a document 
on screen representation of documents 

as they will be printed (including line 

spacing, superscripts and subscripts) 
on screen headers and footers 
underlining, boldface and italic 

enhancement of text 



LPD Writer 

Word Processor 



LPD Planner 

Spreadsheet 



LPD Filer 

Database 



LPD" PLANNER Spreadsheet ' 

multiple spreadsheets can be manipu- 
lated at one time 

more than one window can be opened 
on any spread sheet 

spreadsheet size: 256 columns by 
65,536 rows 

sideways printing 

cells can be displayed underlined, 
boldface and italicized 

pie charts, line graphs, bar graphs and 
stacked bar graphs available 

variable width columns 

horizontal, vertical and "smart" 
recalculation 



Powerful software that's simple 
to use. 

Digital 

Solutions 

Inc. 

30 Wertheim Court, No. 2 
Richmond Hill, Ontario 
Canada L4B 1B9 
Telephone 
(416) 731-8775 



LPD™ FILER Database' 

multiple databases can be used at 

one time 
more than one window can be opened 

on a specific database 
multi-page record layouts 
six field types: numeric, character, logical, 

date, time, note 
user-definable order of field entries and 

default field values 
calculations during record entry 
databases may be sorted on multiple 

fields simultaneously 
use of index files for fast access 
report generation including headers, 

footers and record-by-record 

calculations. 



'Available October. 1986 







% 




«*« 






¥ 




.* I 




* + ■'&& 



AMIGA News AMIGA News AMIGA News AMIGA News 



Supersoft 
take Pets 

Following the closedown of 
Commodore's Corby factory, 
Supersoft have bought from 
Palan Electronics the bulk of 
the PET computers, disk 
drives, and printers that were 
up for sale. 

Several hundred new and 
used machines were involved, 
including a large batch of 
brand new 1361 dot matrix 
printers, and Supersoft have 
taken on a new warehouse in 
the Corby area to hold the 
stock. 

One of the few companies 
still to support the PET, 
Supersoft still offer over two 
hundred different programs, 
add-on boards and other 
accessories for the PET range. 
Over the past 18 months 
Supersoft have been buying 
and selling reconditioned 
equipment on a small scale, 
mainly as a service to regular 
customers, since many 
Commodore business systems 
dealers have gone over to 
IBM or Apricot. However, fol- 
lowing this purchase the 




Showstopper 

The Amiga was shown for the 
f i rst time in Australia at PC 86 
at Sydney. Without doubt, 
Amiga was the hit of the show, 
with over 22,000 people at- 
tending the Commodore stand 
over four days. In this period 
demonstrations were given 
every hour showing off the 
Amiga's capabilities to large 
crowds. One interesting aspect 
was that 80% of potential 
buyers were either cu rrent, or 
intending, PCXT owners. The 
reason for this was due to the 
Amiga's extended capabilities 
over the XT and the fact that 
Amiga can run ST applica- 
tions. The net effect has been 
that Commodore Australia 
sold out of Amigas within the 
first week of releasing the 
computer and shortly there- 
after had back orders exceed- 
ing 2,000 units. As supply has 
continued demand has 
strengthened. The company 
has secured distribution rights 
to many software packages 
from the USA to ensure that 
they can give customers Amiga 
solutions to problems. 



supply of hardware will be- 
come a significant part of 
Supersoft's business. 

Supersoft director Peter 
Calver, said "The Commo- 
dore PET still represents a 
large slice of our software 
turnover — I think we're the 
only software house that still 
regards it as a serious machine. 
We intend to make sure that 
PET users have a source of 
machines, spares, software, 
and service well into the 
1990's." 

Supersoft will be offering 
the equipment to both end- 
users and dealers, and as an 
initial step are writing to the 
thousands of PET owners 
who have bought from 
Supersoft since the company 
was founded in 1978. 

Contact Supersoft 01 -861 1166 



Elephant News 

Floppy disk manufacturer, 
Dennison, has announced two 
new additions to its Elephant 
Memory Systems brand of 
micro floppies. They are the 
EMS-MF-2 double sided 3.5 
inch disk suitable for all disk 
drives with this specification 
and the EMS-12 high density 
double sided 5.25 inch, 96 
tracks per inch, disk for use in 
the new generation IBM AT 
type machines and compati- 
bles. The EMS-12 belongs to 
the category of disks often 
referred to, because of large 
storage capacity, as the 1.6 
megabyte disk. 

Both disks provide superior 
data protection made to above 
industry standards with every 
disk certified 100% error ad 



Memory 

Megastore has producted a 
5 1 / 4 inch optical disk drive 
which has significant advan- 
tages over other optical pro- 
ducts. As a complete sub- 
system, it comes with utility 
software and a library of rou- 
tines written on Lattice C. 

The system can direct read 
during write. It does this by 
having a series of lenses 
within the head of the drive 
which monitor the write pro- 
cess. Conventional Winches- 
ters do a latency check. It also 
has a fast average access 
time of 130 milliseconds. In 
addition, the drive has the 
ability to select over 300 KB 
without stepping the optical 
head. 

At £500, there is 400 MB of 
user data available on a dou- 
blesided cartridge. The sys- 



tem has the ability to update 
records at sector level. 
Contact: Megastore, Erith 
(0322) 339922 

Office Workstations has 
launched a new service called 
CD-Now. CD-Now supplies 
customers with everything for 
a 50MB Compact Disk Read 
Only Memory (CD Rom) 
system. 

The company estimate that, 
for about £9,750, yu can build 
your own CD-Rom develop- 
ment system on a PC. It pro- 
vides the software, the pre- 
mastering services disk 
mastering and disk manufac- 
turing in a single package. It 
is aimed at organisations who 
are considering CD-rom pub- 
lishing, but have been alarmed 
by the cost. 

Contact: Office Workstations 
(031)652 2235 



New Star 

STAR have introduced the 
NB-15. It is 300 cps draft and 
1 00 cps letter quality. It has a 
friction and tractor feed, and 
semi-automatic paper load- 
ing. It also features down load 
characters — space for 128 
individually created charac- 
ters in draft or letter quality. 
The font cartridge system 
allows three different fonts to 
reside in the printer. And it 
has a 16K text buffer — the 
equivalent of around 8 pages 
of text. Another feature usef u I 
for programmes and trouble- 
shooting is a hex dump. It is 
PC compatible. £949.00 (+ 
VAT) 



problem free with quality 
maintained for over 1 2 million 
passes. In addition, all disks 
are backed by the Dennison 
Lifetime Warranty. 

The 5.25 inch floppies are 
supplied in 10's while the 3.5 
inch disks come in boxes of 5. 
The unusual facility of being 
able to buy in smallerquanti- 
ties has positive consumer 
appeal. 

These two new additions 
complete the Elephant range 
of micro floppies which now 
comprises 8, 5.25 and 3.5 inch 
disks single and double sided 
and in single (48 tpi), double 
and quad density versions. 

John Wise, Dennison's sales 
and marketing manager 
computer supplies and sta- 
tionery, is confident that the 
timing of the ds 3.5 inch disk 
launch, in particular, is spot 
on. The disk is beginning to 
come into its own as the 
AMIGA gains popularity and 
when IBM begins to ship 
equipment using this system. 
At present, the 3.5 inch disk 
represents about 10% of the 
UK market. 



Wordcraft 

Wordcraft International has 
produced a new version of its 
wordprocessing package, 
Wordcraft. Wordcraft Nova is 
aimed at the first time user 
and costs £150. All the com- 
mands and controls are the 
same as its predecessor and it 
can be upgraded to Wordcraft. 
Contact: Wordcraft Interna- 
tional (0206)561608 



4 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



AMIGA News AMIGA News AMIGA News AMIGA News 



Print Out 

ELECTRONIC Printing Sys- 
tems claims that its new laser 
printer can handle 10 pages 
per minute. The EPS 1000 has 
been designed to tackle a 
paper load between 5,000 and 
20,000 sheets per month. 

The company also claims a 
number of firsts. These include 
a photocopying facility, also a 
larger paper handling capac- 
ity, to maintain work flow 
without interruptions. An 
optional sequencer is also 
available, to provide output 
that is collated ready for 
distribution. 

Standard fonts in both land- 
scape and portrait can be 
added and there's an elec- 
tronic font switching and font 
downloading. This enables 
printing of 22 fonts in sizes 
ranging from six to 24. 

Interface options are 
RS232C serial asynchronous, 
Centronics or Dataproducts 
parallel, IBM 34/36/38 plus 
others. 

Contact Electronic Printing 
Systems Fareham (03290) 
221121. 

PRINTER company Epson has 
added the EX800, a near letter 
quality and draft dot matrix 
printer to its range. 

Selling at £505, the EX800 
is an 80 column, nine pin prin- 
ter which can print out up to 
300 characters per second 
and 12 characters per inch. In 
near letter quality mode, the 
EX800 uses a 18 x 18 charac- 
ter print matrix. Epson says 
the EX800 is the first to allow 
NLQ printing in sub/supers- 
cript. Other print modes are 
normal, enlarged, condensed, 
emphasized, double strike, 
underlined and italic. 

Print selection is made by 
using an eight key, back-lit 
panel on the front of the prin- 
ter. It is also possibleto select 
modes using software control 
or DIP switches on the back 
of the printer. There is also a 
self-test routine which prints 
out the dip switch setting as 
well as the characteer set. 

The EX800 also includes an 
eight bit parallel interface and 
a serial RS232C interface, an 
8KB input buffer expandable 
to 40KB and IBM compatibil- 
ity under software control. 
Contact: 
Epson 01-902 8892. 



DATA Distributors Limited is 

selling the Seikosha MP- 
1300AI, an 80-column dot 
matrix printer at £282. The 
MP-1300AI has a colour 
option; you add a clip-on, 
clip-off colourcard and colour 
ribbon. 

The machine has a newly- 
designed nine-pin print head. 
It can print in near letter qual- 
ity at 50 characters per second 
and has a draft speed of 300 
cps. 

The printer is fully compat- 
ible with Epson FX and IBM 
PC and can handle single 
sheets or continuous station- 
ery up to a maximum width of 
10 inches. 

Contact DDL Ascot (0990) 
28921 . 



Amiga 

Bulletin 

Board 

There is now a UK Bulletin 
Board for AMIGA users. Run 
by an organisation called 
Computer Supplies in Swan- 
sea, it is Bulletin AT — a FIDO 
board. It has already some 
useful public domain software 
and is looking towards a 
MBBC (Multiple Bulletin Board 
Conference) for the AMIGA, 
linking up with Norway and 
the USA. 

Besides reviews and dis- 
tributor information, there are 
also special offers on software. 
Telephone: 0792 - 297845 
(voice line outside hours) 
Times: 6pm to 9pm week- 
days; 24 hours weekends 
Protocol: 8 bits 1 stop No par- 
ity 

Speeds: 300/300; 1200/75; 
1200/1200 (V21 -22-23) 

AMIGA Board 

Another Bulletin Board has 
been announced. It is to be 
run through on Amiga users 
Group led by Trevor Seaton 
on behalf of the Cavendish 
Commodore Centre in Lei- 
cester. 

The Board will be split into 
sections. The early ones will 
be free and the rest available 
on subscription to the Users 
Group. There will be a sub- 
stantial amount of public 
domain software and advan- 
tages to users. 

Times: 6 p.m. to 8 a.m. on 
0533 550993. 



Expanding 
memory 

A program that lets programs 
treat hard disk drives and 
extended memory boards as 
if they were expanded memory 
has been announced by Tele- 
Ware West in California. 

Above Disc, the package, 
allows users who do not have 
expanded memory boards to 
create large spreadsheets and 
databases when using pro- 
grams that support the Lotus- 
Intel-Microsoft expanded 
memory specification (EMS). 



CBM 
launches 
upgraded 
PCs 

Commodore has 
launched new ver- 
sions of its IBM 
compatible PC 10 
and PC 20 micros 

The PC 10 II and PC 20 II 
come complete with either 
mono or colour monitors and 
start in the UK at a price of 
£1,199 (exc VAT) for the 10 
and £1 ,799 (exc VAT) for the 
20. 

Specification 

The new machines' specifi- 
cations include512 K RAM as 
well as an AGA (Advanced 
Graphics Card). The 20 in- 
cludes a 20Mbyte Winchester 
drive, while the 10 has twin 
double sided, double density 
360 floppy drives. 

Commodore's business 
market sales now account for 
some 50 per cent of the UK's 
business compared with five 
per cent in the past. 



Game — for 
the Amiga 

Activisions successful and 
critically acclaimed 
GAMEMAKER is available for 
the Amiga from September. 

Gamemaker is an easy-to- 
use creativity todl which allows 
Amiga owners to create their 
own computer games — with- 
out having to learn compli- 
cated assembly languages — 
or spend frustrating months 
programming their ideas. 

Using a joystick, the "de- 
signer" selects from a menu 
of commands to produce and 
animate characters and draw 
backgrounds, create sound 
effects and compose musical 
scores. All the components 
produced are then brought 
together. 

The Gamemaker Compu- 
ter Game Design Kit consists 
of: Spritemaker, Scenemaker, 
Soundmaker, Musicmakerand 
The Editor. 



IBM Loses 
PC Market 

! According to Romtec, a lead- 
ing UK market research 
organization, while IBM took 
half the PC market in the UK 
in the last quart ?r of 1985, its 
market share fas fallen to 
43.5% for the first half of 1 986. 
Olivetti and Compaq, which 
had 44% and 23% respec- 
tively of the compatibles at 
the end of 1985 were down to 
36% and 20% by the end of 
the second quarter of 1986. 



Chinese PC's 

China is planning to become 
self-sufficient in PC manufac- 
turing. Through a campaign 
set up by the Chinese 
government, some 80% of the 
personal computers to be 
installed in the year 1990 will 
be manufactured in China. 
PC installations have more 
than doubled annually in China 
during the past five years. 



COMMODORE BUSINESS AND 
AMIGA USER 



Managing 

Editor.. Antony Jacobson 

Contributing 

Editor Bill Donald 

Writers Ian Bennett 

Julian Rosen 

Hugh Riley 

Advertising 

Manager Max 

Jacobson 



Sharon Gilkes 



Production 
Manager .. 

Consultant 

Art Editor .. Graham Baldock 



©Croftward Limited 1986 

Printed by Chase Web Offset. 
COMMODORE BUSINESS and AMIGA 
USER is published by Croftward Ltd, 
40 Bowling Green Lane, London EC1 R 
ONE. Tel: 01-278 0333 ext. 274. 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 5 



SoftWood Company presents 



ia.i 



#> 



A 



■ ': 1 



&a 



Mi Amiga Word 



IB 




Multi-Window Editing 
of separate documents... 

On-line Spelling Checker allows 
easy insertion of new words... 

Headers and Footers for all, left 
facing, or right facing pages... 

Search and Replace 
through entire document... 

User-definable Glossary with 
easy insertion of new terms... 

Supports large documents... 



Document size limited 

only by size of disk... 
Cut, copy, paste within 

and between documents... 
Left and/ or right margin 

justification of text... 
Copy and paste from 

MiAmiga File database... 

Mail Merge with MiAmiga 
File database or ASCII file. 



MiAmiga File 



Easily define column widths, 
placement and justification... 

Format numeric fields with commas, 
dollar signs, and/or decimals... 

Transfer quickly between full 
database and selected records... 

Transfer conveniently from 
selected record to data entry form... 

Print columnar reports from list 
including automatic page headings 
and cumulative totals... 



MIRmigo File 










MIC 


1 r 


i 


Southwest Reel Estate For Sale 




1 






Dwelling 


Location 


Beds 


Baths 


Pool 


Price [0j 


7 


House 
House 


Santa Barbara 


3 


2 


Yes 


$360,000 M 
(250,000 


Sanio Barbara 


3 


2 


No 


3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


House 
House 


Phoenix 


4 


3 


YBS 


5 155,000 


Tucson 


4 


25 


Yes 


11)0,000 


House Santo Monica 


3 


2 


No 


J 177,000 


Condo 


los Angeles 


2 


1 


NO 


S95.000 


Apt 


San Francisco 


1 


1 


m 


1120,000 




9 

10 


Condo 


San Jose 


2 


2 


ves 


S7S.000 


House 


Palo Alto 


3 


2.5 


No 


1225.000 


AD l 


Sanlo Barbara 


2 


1 


NO 


S 120.000 




11 


House 


Santa Monica 


2 


1 


No 


$95,000 




12 


Condo 


Venice 


2 


1 


SO 


J80.OOO 


B 































Format mailing labels 
by positioning fields on form... 

Automatic scrolling of data 
within a field during data entry... 

Optionally capitalize the first 
letter of each word automatically. 

Modify form as needed for 
convenient placement of data... 

Data entry form automatically 
created by system during 
database definition. 



MiAmiga Ledger 



Easily define column widths, 
placement, and justification... 

Multi-window screen allows 
convenient access to both Chart 
of Accounts and Journal Entries... 

Edit/ Post of Journal Entries 
to Chart of Accounts... 

User-definable Chart of Accounts... 

Transfer quickly between full 

GL database and selected records... 
Zoom feature automatically 

expands windows to full screen size. 



Print columnar reports from 
list including automatic page 
headings and cumulative totals... 

Format numeric fields with commas, 
dollar signs, and/ or decimals... 

12 months of prior balance info 
maintained for each account... 

Both current period and fiscal 
year-end close... Follows 
standard accounting practices... 

User-definable custom reports and 
a full set of standard GL reports. 



MIRmigo Ledger 


MIC 


Chart at Recounts 


1 




Recount Description Tgpe Opening 


Jan 86 Balance 


a 


1 1 100 Cosh A 50,000 00 


400 00 50.400 00 


2 1 10 Accnl Receivable a 1,00000 


100 00 1,100 00 


S 


3 120 Sportswear Inv a 6.500 00 


300.00' 6.000 00 


4 | 130 Free weights A 12,25000 


00- 12.250 00 


3h flcce p'ii ueie,e ini fe i£ 


|Ha|ESrg| = | 


Journal Entries 


| 






Tran Date Recount Description Source 


Debit Credit 


u 


■ 


1 1/1/86 400 Holiday specials TJD 


1.100 00 


2 


1 1/1/86 100 casn TJD 


1.000 00 


3 


1 I/1/B6 no Accnt Receivable TJD 


100 00 


<* 


2 1/1/66 620 Misc Expense TJD 


100 00 


D 


e 


|flccept j|oelete|P 


| Undo JJ New | |f 




Ever H 

Commodore, Amiga, and Intuition are trademarks of Commodore-Amiga, Inc. 
Copyright SoftWood Company, 1986. 

805-966-5884 

SoftWood Company, P.O. Box 2280, Santa Barbara, CA 93120 



distributed in europe by: 

Haba Systems Ltd. 

Pier Road, 

North Feltham Trading Estate, 

Feltham, Middlesex, TW14 OTT 

Tel: 01-751 6451 

Telex: 265871 MONREF G (WJJ 175) 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMU 



MI-AMIGA FILE is a database manage- 
ment system (DMS) for the AMIGA 
using the INTUITION user-interface. 
INTUITION, forthe benefit of those who 
have not seen it, is in very simple terms 
the graphic system overlaying the main 
operating system of the machine. The 
WORKBENCH provides the primary 
environment of INTUITION and uses 
many of INTUITION'S elements such as 
disk icons, gadgets and windows. 
INTUITION is very highly rated by users 
and programmers alike for providing a 
stable, robust and creative vehicle and 
does not suffer from the limitations 
endemic in Digital Research's GEM, 
which amongst otherthings is extremely 
limited in the number of windows it can 
support. Microsoft's much vaunted 
WINDOWS isalso rapidly accumulating 
a reputation for being difficult to use 
and program — a complete contrast to 
INTUITION. 

Database management provides for 
the collection, storage and collation of 
user data whether in numeric, character 
or alphanumeric form. The collation 
process extends to manipulation of the 
data by indexing and comparison to- 
gether with the user defining the form of 
output to printer or screen. The basic 
elements of operation in a DMS are the 
field, record and file. Using the ubiqui- 
tous card index as an example, a card in 
a book library would have the book's 
title, author's name and classification 
code entered into fields. The fields 
would be entered on the card which in 
turn would be called a record and the 
collection of cards would be named a 
file. The structure of the fields do not 
have to be identical, for example the 
library card would have the book title 
and author in character form whilst the 
classification code would be in numeric 
form. 

The MI-AMIGA FILE is supplied on a 
single disk which can be readily trans- 
ferred to hard disk. A 60 page manual 
covering vitually all of the points of 
using the product completes the pack- 
age. The manual is both very easy to 
read and follow — perhaps lacking a 
little in substance, or maybe this is a 
personal thing having been used to 
the solidity and weight of MS-DOS and 
UNIX DMS manuals! A plus point of MI- 
AMIGA FILE is it's ability to support 
additional RAM — this has the benefit of 
much faster file manipulations since 
most, if not all, of the file can be held in 
memory rather than on disk. MI-AMIGA 
FILE provides for no less than 8 different 
types of field together with a maximum 
of 32 fields per record which allows the 
system designer excellent flexibility in 
constructing a database. The field types 
are alpha, amount, date, text, time, 
yes/no, phone and alphanumeric with a 
maximum of 64 characters per field 
where appropriate. Thus an average 



application containing 32 fields would 
hold just under 2000 characters per 
record. 

An alpha field is either text or space 
characters whilst amount is obviously 
meant for financial data as it supports 
dollar signs, commas and 2 decimal pla- 
ces. The AMIGA keyboard supports the 
English pound sign but not other cur- 
rencies. The date field is fixed to the 
USA-only format of the U.S dollar and 
MM/DD/YY and the text field is any key- 
board character, text or numeric and 
hence is the most commonly used field. 
The time field allows entry in either 24 
hour clock snytax, i.e. HH:MM or in 12 
hour format AM or PM. The phone field 
is a variation on the alpha field in that it 
will accept numbers only together with 
certain other characters such as brackets, 
hyphens and fullstops whilst the remain- 
ing fields, alphanumeric and yes/no are 
self-explanatory. 

A field can be added or deleted any 
where within a record without concern 
about the fate of the contents if the field 
exists — the contents are simply dumped. 
The appearance of a record may be in a 
row and column format:- 
The design of the form is left to the user 
and fields can be placed anywhere on 
the screen, there are no restrictions on 
where the field types are to be placed 
within a record. Using the form option is 
very useful for dealing with data input 
from an unskilled user. In addition to 
removal and deletion of a field, the field 

I —L 



MI-AMIGA 



width may altered or contents justified 
to the left, right or centre — very useful 
in crowded screen layouts. Although it 
is not necessary to place all the fields of 
a record within the confines of an indi- 
vidual screen, a horizontal scroll will 
reveal further portions if desired. 

Printer Output 

User input is very well handled with the 
scroll bars of INTUITION being put to 
very effective use and also the TAB key 
serving to retrieve the last record for 
editing of errors. Another useful feature 
is the Auto Capitalise which will make 
the first text character of a field entry a 
capital. 

Information about the file status is 
very comprehensive and will display the 
name of the file, number of records, file 
space unused, average record size in 
characters and approximate record 
capacity within the file. Printer output is 
also handled in the same easy manner. 
The printer to be used is that defined in 
the user's PREFERENCES file within the 
WORKBENCH. Once more the user can 
design the layout of the printed output 



by moving the fields around in any order 
to arrive at their requirements. 

Since it is very easy to add further 
fields and temporarily or permanently 
delete fields, the customising of mailing 
lists can be very fast indeed. The printed 
output can be sent to an 80 column or 
132 column printer. Output can also be 
sent to an ASCII disk file for operation 
with other applications such as SCRIB- 
BLE! word processor, ANALYZE! 
spreadsheet or an electronic mail link 
via modem. Although the manual makes 
no mention of reading ASCII files back 
into MI-AMIGA FILE. It also took me 
some time to get into the habit of 
appending a .FLR suffix on saving a new 
file to disk. This suffix is used by the 
application to recognise a database file. 
Unfortunately if the user misses it out 
the first time aorund, the file fails to 
appear on the database directory. This 
can cause some consternation until it is 
realised that the file is actually present 
on the disk and the user must descend 
into AmigaDOS to rename the file with 
the suffix. 

Sorting data is very much a strong 
feature of MI-AMIGA FILE. This can be 
accomplished through logical opera- 
tors and ascending and descending 
columns as well as sorts of fields within 
a field. The records obtained in this 
manner can then be saved to disk or 
output to the printer although once 
more the manual makes no reference to 
this. The sorts themselves are commen- 
dably quick, I was never waiting more 
than a minute, even on very large sort- 
ing. Indeed most of the time the sorts 
were finished before I had realised it — 
just how much this has to do with the 
replacment of the 68000 cpu with a 
68010 in my system is unknown. 

MI-AMIGA FILE is not a relational 
DMS, it is a flat file system with the cor- 
responding limitations these have. It is 
fast and easy to operate with minimal 
time spent searching the manual. What 
it lacks in the version I reviewed was 
insufficient explanation of all of its 
capabilities and a failure on the pro- 
grammer's partto realise that the AMIGA 
is an international product going into 
markets outside of the USA i.e. the date 
format and dollar-sign-only currency 
choice. These are minor points, but 
should receive attention in the next ver- 
sion released. It is robust (no system 
crash experienced) and leaves me with 
the strong impression that it is a good 
solid product. As an entry-level data- 
base for the AMIGA it is well worth 
buying. 

Supplier: Haba Systems Ltd. 
Pier Road 

North Feltham Trading Estate 
FELTHAM 

Middlesex TW14 OTT. 
Tel. 01-751 6451 
Price: £99.95 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 7 




I 

D 

E 
O 














£*§§ 









\ VS.^S? 




This is the big one from Electronic Arts 
— the package that puts together thefull 
potential of Deluxe Paint, Print and 
Music. It doesn't generate sound or 
complex images itself but it will accept 
any IFF compatible sound and graphics 
files and combine them as video. Add 
to that a 3D text generator which can 
rotate, flip, expand and shrink, a framer 
utility which enables bit-mapped anima- 
tion and a scene generator for auto^ 
matic titles, pie charts and bar charts 
and you have a very powerf u I video tool . 
There are three disks to the package. 
The master is the Deluxe Video Maker. 
The other two are utilities and demos. 
The master disk presents you with a 
'video spreadsheet'. The video is re- 
presented on screen as a track, analo- 
gous to a sound track or a film track, 
divided along its length into 22 second 
sections. On this track are placed icons 
representing the scenes which make up 
the video. Movable arrows mark the 
beginning and end of each scene. Click- 
ing the mouse on the icon brings up a 
new window which contains the scene 
script, again shown as a track the length 
of the scene. 

The system is quickly mastered. It 
makes a highly complex program sim- 
ple to use and the visual effects are 
extremely impressive. Full screen pic- 
tures can be faded in and out or wiped 
from one to the other in six different 
directions, while expanding, shrinking 
or breaking intothescreen. Parts of pic- 
tures, saved as brushes under Deluxe 
Paint, can be moved around the screen, 
resized or colour-cycled, These 'objects' 
can be made to leave a trail or fade out. 
They can be 'stamped' into the picture 
when they reach their destination and 
become part of the background. 

Animation is made easy with the 'fra- 
mer' utility. The intermediate stages of a 
sequence drawn on a graphics package 
are put together to form one animated 
object which can then be treated like 
any other. 

Music and sound effects are laid 
down onto the tracks in the same way as 
graphics from sound files generated by 
a music program or digitised sound in 
IFF format. They can be modified within 
the video for volume, rate and tempo. 
The duration of all graphics and sound 
effects can be altered at any point. 

In addition to treating graphics from 
other sources Deluxe Paint can gener- 
ate video images within itself. A plain 
background can be filled in any one of 8 
patterns, in any one of 4 colour modes 
— including reversed bit pattern and 
inverse video. 

There are two powerful text genera- 
tors. Text line enables you to use any of 
the system fonts in normal, shadow, 





underline, bold and italic. Polygon text 
is 3 Dimensional. Whatever you type in 
can be resized throughout the video or 
rotated through any axis. Letters can be 
in shadow, outline and italic as well as 
standard format and can be filled with 
any of 8 patterns in any colour. In addi- 
tion to alphanumericcharacters, polygon 
text includes a selection of geometric 
polygons that can be treated in the same 
way as text. 

The scene generators provide some 
automatic graphic displays. Information 
typed into a requester js displayed in the 
form of animated pie charts, bar charts, 
credit and title scenes. These are a little 
crude, but they do provide a starting 
point for your own productions. 

While assembling a video it can be 
viewed at any point. On screen is a 
representation of avideo remote control 
and with this you can play forward, 
back, fast forward, fast reverse or cycle 
or watch the video frame by frame in 
either direction. A timer lets you know 
where you are on the track to make edit- 
ing extremely accurate. 

Dropping down onto video tape is 
made easier by having a selection of 
running speeds. Half and quarter speed 
enable a video recorder that can run at 
slow speed to make a smoother record- 
ing. 'Superslow' shows each frame at 
1/30th second, this is the American 
standard video rate so by manually 
advancing computer video and video 
recorder it is possible to get very good 
results. 

Virtually everything in the program is 
WIMP driven with extensive use of win- 
dowing to request information or to 
move objects about. When objects need 
to be placed or moved on screen they 
can be viewed with x and y coordinates 





Reviewed by 








alongside for greater accuracy. Pictures 
can be loaded from disk and viewed 
before they are placed in the video. 

There is a limitation here in that 
Deluxe Video supports a palette of only 
8 colours. Obviously you can choose 
which 8 but it does mean that detail is 
reduced. In order to make files accepta- 
ble to the program you have the choice 
of 'best colour' or 'current palette' 
colours. Best colour uses the 8 most 
common colours in a picture. I found 
that most of my pictures looked much 
better than I expected when treated this 
way. Foreground objects can be in a 
different palette from a background pic- 
ture. When an object is 'stamped' into 
the background, however, the back- 
ground takes on the colour of that 
object. 

Videos can be chained together to 
form one long video. The only limit is the 
size of th disk storage space. It is also 
possible to insert pauses of up to two & 
3/4 hours in a video while the computer 
awaits a key press to restart. These two 
options come together in the command 
'keychain' which provides the basis of 
interactive video. With each keychain 
command up to 10 different videos can 
be chained together with a particular 
key assigned to each one. It is possible 
therefore, to branch conditionally on a 
key press to a new set of options. This 
type of program has obvious uses in 
education. 



One of the utility disks contains two 
devices to improve your video editing. 
Unpack allows you to disassemble parts 
of existing videos — the demo for 
example — for use in other displays. 
Vidcheck compresses the video by 
removing unnecessary parts, so using 
less disk space. It also provides a print- 
out of the video file, to screen or printer, 
summarising the composition of the 
video. The framer is also on this disk 
along with several demonstrations. 

The other disk contains the video 
player. This utility enables you to run a 
finished video without loading Deluxe 
Video. The player is not copy protected 
so it allows you to distribute your videos 
without difficulty. 

Deluxe Video is full of effects that can 
be used in combination with each other. 
It is extremely easy to use once you have 
ploughed through the manual and its 
certainly the most useful animator that 
has arrived so far for the Amiga. It is 
expensive, as are all the Amiga tools 
at the moment, especially when, in order 



to use Deluxe Video to its optimum you 
also need a music generating program, 
a sound digitiser, a quality graphics 
package, a video recorder, genlock and 
camera, a frame buffer and a frame 
grabber. All of which is going to be 
wasted without at least a 2 megabyte 
expansion because otherwise your 
videos will always be in short bursts. 

Apart f romthat it really is outstanding, 
a delight to use. The program is dearly 
laid out for you to see, you can run 
through it step by step, rewind/and edit 
with no trouble at all. 

The packaging hypes up the product 
outrageously, especially as a professio- 
nal/business tool. I don't think any of the 
moving graphics utilities are adequate 
for business use in themselves yet. But 
it's certainly enormous fun to create 
with and if standards keep rising like this 
we'll have some really amazing stuff 
before long. The AMIGA is really going 
to shake up our ideas of what is possible 
for graphics. 

H.R. 




l!Ete , --"»«nr.t«Jl«A 



COVER 

UP! 




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CCI is making a special offer of strong, goodlooking 
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neat yellow on black logo. They are of the highest quality 
and manufactured in smooth plastic to first class 
standards. CCI covers... Protect your Commodore 
computer with a touch of style. On/ 



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USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI A 



INSTANT MUSIC 



Music and personal computers were 
made for each other. In mak'ng this very 
sweeping statement I speak as someone 
who received musical training at school 
and continues to play occasionally. 
Whilst it may be argued that a computer 
is actually a musical instrument in its 
own right — one only has to listen to 
musical style of Todd Rundgren or 
Jean-Michel Jarre — the ability of 
computers to assist in the composi- 
tional process is an acknowledged fact. 
This aid is shown in the form of access 
to an infinite variety of sounds. The 
speed of access is largely dependent on 
the hardware and software capabilities 
of the system as a whole and as many 
readers will appreciate, the AMIGA is 
not lacking in hardware facilities. 

However, the creation of sound is 
only part of the process of composition 
and placing these waveforms into a 
pattern which we call music is the true 
art form which a computer can never 
hope to match — the machine has to be 
programmed at some stage by a human, 
musician or not. 



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One of my dictionaries defines music 
as "the science and art of beautiful 
sound" which seems to me to be a fair 
and accurate summary. The sound 
capabilities of the AMIGA are without 
exageration beyond comparison 
amongst any of the current range of 
personal computers. Those who have 
listened to the sound output from an 
AMIGA in the hands of an user with 
musical experience through a good 
quality stereo system can testify to the 
validity of this. This highest problem to 
date has been software to support the 
machine. MUSICRAFT is the usual veh- 
icle for demonstrating the sound of the 
AMIGA and although this piece of soft- 
ware is unfinished it has already achieved 
legendary status among those AMIGA 
owners who are fortunate enough to 
have an illicit copy. I think that despite 
MUSICRAFT holding the claim to be the 
most pirated software piece in the 
AMIGA catalogue — when the finished 



product is made available it will become 
an instant best-seller. It has already 
created its own market simply on the 
premises of what can be achieved with 
MUSICRAFT even in an unfinished 
condition! 

INSTANT MUSIC from Electronic 
Arts provides the purchaser with a 
musical environment in which to exper- 
iment. It is not a compositional package 
in the classical sense of providing staffs, 
staves, crochets and quavers — rather 
more a template or stencil for the user to 
explore. I suppose the keyword to this 
software is improvisation since it allows 
the user limited compositional facilities 
together with direct real-time interac- 
tion with the sound using an input 
device, in this instance the mouse. I say 
limited composition since only the mus- 
ical note patterns can be edited — the 
sound waveforms cannot. To achieve 
this the user must make additional pur- 
chases in the shape of sound-digitising 
firmware. The package is supplied on a 
single copy-protected (no comment!) 
disk together with a 55 page manual. 
Because of the copy protection I was 
able to verify the effectiveness of this 
software with additional RAM and a 
hard disk. 

The manual is rather lacking in dia- 
grams and is styled in the manner of 
using one continuous example, finished 
off with a reference section beginning 
about halfway through. I presume the 
lack of diagrams is due to the format of 
the package which formulates its own 
ideas on musical notation. I cannot 
comment on how this would affect a 
user who cannot read music and to 
whom a crochet means a bad-tempered 
85 year old, but since I can read music 
and tend to think in terms of notes, 
sharps and flats, I found it difficult to 
follow at first. Eventually the peculiar 
notation began to fall into place. The 
program disk contains a number of 
libraries of pre-arranged songs and 
melodies for the user to play and modify 
in addition to several further libraries of 
instruments or sounds as the package 
terms them. 

Underneath the front-end, INSTANT 
MUSIC uses conventional music tech- 
niques such as harmonic voicing and 
diatonic pitching. The former will ensure 
that whatever the user enters will play 
back pitched at the correct note within 
the context of the existing melody. Dia- 
tonic pitching is an extension of this and 
allows very rapid pitch changes over the 



full 6 octave range supported by the 
package. Chords, melodies and scales 
areall concepts recognised by INSTANT 
MUSIC as well as a number of rhythmic 
patterns. This is the key to whole pack- 
age as its 'forte' is the ability to allow the 
user to yam or play along with the music, 
the AMIGA taking care of such mun- 
dane matters as pitching and timing the 
selected notes. The input device is the 
AMIGA mouse which gives a speedier 
response than the natural choice of the 
keyboard. Depending on how many of 
the 4 DMA (direct memory access) 
sound channels are in use at any given 
instant, a user-selected note may. be 
played as chord — a very polished dem- 
onstration of the capabilities of the 
speed of the AMIGA'ssound hardware. I 
mentioned earlier that the instruments 
could not be edited in terms of their 
waveform although they can be trans- 
posed meaning re-pitched or adjust- 
ments made to their individual volume. 
Careful use of these facilities can allow 
some very subtle texturing of the music 
output albeit in a limited form. 

Editing of the musical rhythms extends 
to cut, paste and copy and there are no 
restrictions on the filing system relate to 
this. Despite the appearance on the 
requestor which indicated that a hard 
disk could be used as a storage device, 
this fajled to operate — quite possibly 
because the syntax employed of "hdO:" 
is unrecognised by AmigaDOS.the cor- 
rect format for a hard disk is "dh(unit 
number)". One particular positive point 
about the files generated by the pack- 
age — they are in IFF format. This is the 
agreed standard AMIGA file format and 
allows portability between different 
applications. 




INSTANT MUSIC lives up to its name 
It is not designed as a deeply serious 
tool for musical development. In fact 
other than serving as the generator of 
IFF music files it merely scratches the 
surface of the machines capability. 
Nevertheless, at the price it costs 
INSTANT MUSIC is worth purchasing t 
give users some feel for the AMIGA 
sound a very big field indeed. 
Supplier: Ariolasoft (UK) Ltd. 
Price: £29.95 



CommndnrR RnsineRs and AMiriA I Ispr 11 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 




LOGISTIX 






LOG ISTIX from GRAFOX Ltd. is the first 
fully integrated business software to 
appear for the AMIGA in the UK — but 
what is 'intergrated software' and what 
can it do? To understand the concept 
you have to look back to the bad old 
days of microcomputers in the late 
1970's. The software product that 
brought micros to the attention of the 
so-called business users was VISICALC 
which was first implemented on the 
APPLE. This was a spreadsheet and 
removed the need for reams of ruled and 
lined paper for basic financial analysis 
and applications. It also allowed finan- 
cial 'models' to be created using ther 
'what if I change this parameter' 
approach which were very time- 
consuming and prone to user-induced 
errors. VISICALC spawned a whole 
generation of spreadsheet products 
such as SUPERCALC and MULTIPLAN 
which are still in use today. 

So if you could arrange numeric 
values in horizontal and vertical colum- 
nar form and manipulate these values 
then why not substitute packets of data 
for the numbers? The packets of data 
could be either numeric or characters or 
a mixture, which is termed alphanu- 
meric — doing this brought about the 
birth of the database. Of course it 
should be realised that none of these 
ideas was totally new to the computer, 
but they were new to microcomputers 
since they breathed life into machines 
that hitherto were confined to the elec- 
tronics hobbyist. This increase in the 
bandwidth of 'usefullness' was further 
enhanced by the introduction of the 
wordprocessor. Thus by the start of the 
eighties three distinct software products 
were in place and coupled with declining 
hardware costs, increasing availability 
of support peripherals such as printers 
and disk drives, everything was in place 
for an explosive growth in demand. 

Such rates of growth in terms of soft- 
ware product innovation could not be 
sustained and users and programmers 
alike began to look at the existing pro- 
ducts to increase further the magic 
ingredient termed 'useability'. One pop- 
ular route taken was to increase the 
number of facilities available to the user 
beginning with a modicum of customi- 
sation followed quickly by program- 
ming the application to suit user requi- 
rements. Indeed, the programming 
element developed into a full-blown 
industry in its own right with the likes of 



the dBASE II database leading the way. 
However, programming is a skill that 
some users do not acquire through 
either inclination or time constraints 
and their requirements tend to be more 
concerned with the facilities available 
immediately. One such facility being 
graphics, another being the manage- 
ment of time resources. 

Management of time has become the 
cornerstone of profitable business 
operations particularly the manufactur- 
ing or service industry environment. 



AS & C Co. 



Contrl necessary in these industries can 
involve either equipment resources or 
manpower resources. Taking a typical 
UK High Street as an example, the 'hire 
outlet' needs control over the items it 
intends to hire out to the public. The 
control consists of both database for the 
range of items in terms of details, costs, 
etc., and a customer detai Is file. The two 
are linked by time control in the context 
of how long the item is on hire for, thus 
high demand (profitable) items can be 
quickly identified. Coupled this with 



Cha ^ed Accountants 




1 2 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



First Quart 



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JSER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI 



establishing a customer profile and the 
business is in a very healthy position to 
actively market itself and it's abilities as 
opposed to the usual waiting-for-them- 
to-walk-in approach. The 'hire outlet' 
could be a video shop, office equipment, 
garage (a very under-rated profit oppor- 
tunity), DIY tools, specialist clothing 
(bridal/dinner jacket), sports equipment. 
Time control of resources in a manufac- 
turing environment assumes even more 





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importance since the items concerned 
represent substantial sums of capital 
expenditure to the business. For exam- 
ple instant-printers, bakers, dry-cleaners, 
any type of electrical or mechanical 
repair facility, any activity involving the 
use of motor vehicles. 

What I have tried to do is to present 
some ideas of using a product that 
combines all of these concepts of time 
control, spreadsheets and databases 
along with graphics. People being what 
they are find that a graphical represen- 
tation of data, numeric or letter-based, 
can be assimilated more quickly. There- 
fore if you can absorb the data faster 
you can react to the implications more 
effectively and deploy your assets more 
profitably. LOGISTIX is just such a pro- 
duct to fulfil the requirements. It con- 
tains a spreadsheet for numeric projec- 
tions and analysis, a timesheet for 
planning of resource assignments, a 
database for storing and retrieving 
information lists, together with graphi- 
cal presentation in several forms of any 
of this data. 

The LOGISTIX spreadsheet allows 
for 2,048 columns with 1.024 rows, a 
truly massive size. By using an advanced 
and intelligent memory management 
regime all cells can be referenced — 
something a lot of spreadsheets which 
claim to have large dimensions will not 
allow. LOGISTIX can operate from the 
Workbench or CLI and colour is given 
prominent support with the spread- 
sheet. A total of 7 colours in addition to 
the background colour provide the user 



with choices for the borders, cursor, 
rows, columns, protected cells and 
command character strings. The colours 
can be saved off as a separate file allow- 
ing some degree of recognition to the 
type of sheet in use if required. 

I was particularly impressed with the 
degree of integration built into the pro- 
duct in terms of other software. For 
instance, files produced by LOTUS 1-2- 
3 or SUPERCALC could be read directly 
by LOGISTIX without the user being 
concerned about formats, references or 
function. Similarly, dBASE, DIF, CSV 
and ASCII files could also be read by 
LOGISTIX, thus removing any obstacle 
to user data portability. This also has the 
benefit of allowing the many users who 
have LOGISTIX implemented on MS- 
DOS machines to avoid the need for 
time-consuming and expensive re- 
training on the product. 

The spreadsheet output to the printer 
is automatically rotated sideways for 
sheets that are too wide for the printer 



Population of Great Britain 



so 




16- 29 



1931 1941 1951 1961 1971 198 
BY AGE (in millions' 



itself. The very wide printer range sup- 
ported also includes colour printers and 
this provides the user with novel and 
effective output since italics, bold and 
underline modes, provided the printer 
can produce these. The AMIGA func- 
tion keys play a large role in output con- 
trol with no less than four keys devoted 
to screen control such as page left and 
page right. I particularly liked the way 
that four function keys were left unde- 
fined for use by the user although I felt 
that the use of key 'F1' for the very 
extensive online HELP was wasteful 
since the AMIGA has a dedicated 
'HELP' key. The depth to which this 
HELP facility extended was astonishing 
— not only was it extremely well thought 
out but it made the use of the manual 
rather the exception than the rule. The 



HELP facility provides over 150 (!) 
screens thus you can appreciate my 
point. 

The manual itself is both well-written 
and concise and avoids the LOTUS 1 -2- 
3 trap of burying the user under exces- 
sive documentation. Besides, on-line 
help is generally a good deal faster than 
looking soemthing up. The LOGISTIX 
manual concentrates on just two things 
— a reference source and an explana- 
tion of the numerous example files. 
These are provided on one of the two 
disks supplied with the LOGISTIX 
package — the other disk forms the 
program disk. The disks themselves are 
unprotected although the program will 
only run with the supplied 'dongle' in 
one of the joystick ports. Although 
Grafox Ltd. the suppliers of LOGISTIX 
have seen fit to exercise their right to 
copy protect their product, I am happy 
that they have done it in the manner 
which I prefer, one which doesn't entail 
wrecking the user's disk drive. In fact the 
Grafox dongle is-so inoffensive to the 
running of my AMIGA that it perman- 
ently resides in the port until the port is 
needed. 

Replication is used heavily by any 
spreadsheet and LOGISTIX in addition 
to the conventional definition of this 
function also provides orthagonal repli- 
cation which converts data from a row 
into a column and vice versa. The Con- 
solidation feature allows data to be read 
in from other worksheets for a 'one-off 
or permanent consolidation. One part of 
LOGISTIX which tends to be over 
looked by too many software authors 
was the provision of foreign character 
sets. For example, how many times have 
you used a product that failed to provide 
a currency option other than the dollar 
— both on the screen and in printed 
output? LOGISTIX provides support for 



Horizontal Bar Chart 



PASSMK 



Humpty Dumpty- 




DCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA U 



LOGISTIX 



cont 



ALL the major currencies in addition to 
accented characters. Recalculation 
routes can be altered and circular refer- 
ence detection will report the cell 
involved. 

There are a total of 74 built-in func- 
tions in LOGISTIX covering mathemati- 
cal, logical, statistical, financial and 
calendar requirements. The modelling 
potential is enhanced through the avail- 
ability of 2 variable what-'if table con- 
structions. Since LOGISTIX provides 
almost another high-level language in 
its own right through the ability to-allow 
users to define macros from the key- 
board, the number of potential func- 
tions is unlimited. These user-defined 
macros provide those with the skill 
unparalleled opportunities to customize 
this package. Debugging or error- 
removal can be a time-consuming busi- 
ness and LOGISTIX allows the macro 
designer single-step tracing and a learn 
mode which gives a display of the cur- 
rent macro line under execution condi- 
tions. Secu rity of macros can be assu red 
through password protected areas within 
the worksheet and since these macros 
can be extended to acceptance and 
placement of keyboard input coupled 
with customised help screens, LOGIS- 
TIX demonstrates just how powerful a 
tool it is. 



The LOGISTIX Timesheet provides a 
flexible computerised wall plannerwhere 
the time segments can be varied from 
half-hour intervals up to yearly intervals. 
The 10 year calendar can be edited to 
adjust the daily working hours, wee- 
kends and public holidays — ideal for 
applications involving shiftwork opera- 
tion or batch production. A total of 2,048 
resources can be controlled under a 
maximum of 1,023 time segments — if 
this is insufficient then another sheet 
can be created and linked through a 
macro. LOGISTIX also has a CRITICAL 
PATH ANALYSIS facility with automatic 
recalculation and display of the critical 
activities together with both free floats 
or total floats. This is yet another power- 
ful feature for project management or 
batch process planning. 

LOGISTIX allows the user to create a 
database using the familiarenvironment 
of rows and columns to form fields and 
records. The data in this area can then 
be manipulated using the classical dat- 
abase functions of indexing, sorting and 
searching. A very large database can be 
constructed using up to 2,048 records 
together with no less than 64 fields with 



full insertion or deletion facilities. I men- 
tioned earlier the ability of LOGISTIX to 
accept files from other formats such as 
dBASE, this can be extended to extract 
data from these files selectively accord- 
ing to criteria defined within the 
worksheet. 

Any of the previously described 
manipulation techniques such as 
spreadsheets or databases can ulti- 
mately be used as vehicles for the dis- 
play of the data in graphical form. Data 
display graphics have moved a long way 
from the single colour multiple lines of 
years gone by to sophiscated Gantt 
charts, stacked bars and scattergrams 
all in glorious technicolour. LOGISTIX 
provides multiple or single pie charts, 
floating or stacked, clustered or linked, 
3D percentage horizontal or vertical 
bars, lines, steps, ticks or scatter charts 
together with Gantt and text slides. The 
user can define 5 independent titles and 
128 free-format annotation lines. With 9 
character fonts and 10 different sizes on 
the screen or on the printout togeter 
with a multitude of additional output 
definitions, it is unlikely that with this 
degree of flexibility ANY user is going to 
be dissatisfied. The hardcopy output 
can be dot-matrix, laser printer or pro- 
fessional plotter since a very large range 
is directly supported. 

The two primary markets for LOGIS- 
TIX are as a management tool and a 
decision aid. It is not difficult to learn 
and given the provision of copious on- 
line help, beginners can produce stan- 
dup work very quickly. I found using 
LOGISTIX a pleasure, not a chore as 
with some software. Whenever I become 
unstick, without fail the manual rescued 
me. In fact the manual is such that I 
found I could read it as reference book 
and learn some new technique each 
time. Only one caveat at LOGISTIX 
which hopefully will be resolved on the 
next product update. This concerns the 
AMIGA mouse — curiously LOGISTIX 
does not support the mouse in any way, 
betraying the PC-DOS origins of the 
product. A mouse and a spreadsheet can 



can chug along very quickly, as I found 
with Analyze! (reviewed in the last issue 
of AMIGA USA) since the current cell 
can be selected much faster with the 
mouse than by using the cursor keys. 
Another point to consider with LOGIS- 
TIX concerns the AMIGA memory. 
Given the facilities of LOGISTIX it is a 
large program and consequently put a 
lot of pressure on the memory of the 
AMIGA. On a 512k machine this is 
manifest in the graphics as LOGISTIX 
will only provide a quarter screen gra- 
phics window — quite simply the 
machine is out of memory. This is not as 
serious as it sounds nor does it mean a 
system crash is about to happen, 
LOGISTIX is too robut for that. The 
answer lies in increasing the memory, a 
not uncommon requirement with inte- 
grated packages. Expanding the memory 
with a 2.0MB card to 2.5MB overcomes 
this problem of small graphic windows 
and the system disk contains 2 addi- 
tional programs for those who have an 
expanded memory AMIGA. The first 
makes use of all the available memory 
whilst retaining the same display of 25 
lines — the second program allows an 
extension to the number of horizontal 
lines to total 44 by introducing an inter- 
laced display. Increasing the memory of 
an AMIGA is a wise move in any event 
and LOGISTIX takes full advantage. 

LOGISTIX and a 2.5MB AMIGA makes 
for a /f/7/ercombination in hardware and 
software terms. Couple this with exten- 
sive software support and the cost of the 
product represents extremely good value 
for money. This is one of the first of the 
so-called business heavyweight pack- 
ages, i.e. integrated software for the 
AMIGA. I have a very strong feeling that 
it will retain it's position as leader in this 
field for a long time to come. 

Supplier: GRAFOX Ltd. 

65 Banbury Road 

OXFORD OX2 6PE. Tel. 0865516281 

UK Distributor: PRECISION SOFTWARE 

Ltd. Tel. 01-330 7166 

Price: £245.00 (including support) 



1 4 flnmmnrinrp. Ri Kinpfis anrl AMIfi A I Ispr 




LUIVUUIV a LMKUESI UI5HLM Y Uh HHIIVI LHtf MUNITOHS 

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our price £49.95 
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DYNEER DW12 

[Identical to Silver 
Reed EXP400) high 
quality daisy wheel 
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specification 

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With CBM l/F £159.95 inc VAT 



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I IIU\U I IUJHI I I IIU\U I IUUII II IILI\U I H-UII I I IIU\U I H-UII I 



Amiga's incredible graphics 




^AMIGA 




just got better 





Aim your video camera and let Digi-View capture 
images with breathtaking clarity. Then use 
friendly, on screen controls to adjust brightness, 
contrast and color for the ultimate image. Digi- 
View uses the Amiga's exclusive hold-and-modify 
mode and sophisticated dithering techniques to 
display broadcast-quality color photographs. Digi- 
View's superb color resolution is made possible by 
a precision color-separation process that uses color 
filters (included) and an inexpensive black and 
white video camera to resolve an amazing 21 bits 
per pixel, or over 2 million shades. 

Orders Only 
1-800-358-3079 Ext 342 

Customer Service 1-913-354-9332 



Capture time 

High-Res 640x400 20 seconds 

Low-Res 320x200 10 seconds 

Color Separation 320x200 30 seconds 

Requires RS-170 Monochrome or RGB Camera with. 2:1 interlace 



Amiga is a trademark ot Commodore-Amiga. Inc. 
© 1986 NewTek 



UK Distributor — Argonaut Software 

129 The Broadway 

Mill Hill 

London NW7 4RN 

Tel. 01-959 0114 

UK price £199.00 plus VAT 



Actual unretouched photo. 

In the monochrome mode, Digi-View features 
resolution of up to 640x400 with 128 gray levels. 
Special image processing software eliminates 
flickering and contour effects. IFF disk format lets 
you transfer pictures to other Amiga graphics 
programs. For scientific image processing or just 
plain fun, to exploit the full power of Amiga 
graphics, see your Amiga dealer, or call toll free 
for your Digi-View video digitizer. 

Digi-View - Seeing is believing. 

Only $199.95 

Video Cameras and accessories available 

DM- JEW 

NewTek 

701 Jackson 

Suite B3 

Topeka, Kansas 66603 



//mm smf 

Digiview has taken the lead in the AMIGA 
market for digitizing for three main 
reasons. First, it is simple to use; second 
it is very inexpensive; third, it has at 
present virtually no competition. 

VideoengineerTimJenisonofTopeka, 
Kansas first created and produced 
Digiview in early 1 986. Afterseiling afew 
homemade ones, he found the demand 
built up rapidly and now has a 
manufacturing facility that is barely 
coping with the growing demand. 
Digiview — an unobtrusive white box, 
8cm by 1 1cm, plugs into the parallel port 
of the AMIGA. There is no need for a 
separate power supply. You simply plug 
the video camera into the monitor to 
focus and that's it. Digiview works on a 
hi-res mono mode of 1 6 grey level of 640 
x 400. It has image processing built-in 
and automatically picks up the most 
suitable but can be manually overidden if 
you wish. Lo-res colour is either HAM 
(Hold and Modify) which allows 4096 
colours on screen simultaneously or 
picks 32 colours which it chooses out of 
2.2 million colours. (For the interested, 
thatis2 2? i.e. seven bitsout of each RGB 
— red, green, blue — 21 bit resolution out 
of each pixel.) Pretty impressive! It works 
out the best colours and pictureand then 
smooths out the graininess. You can tell 
it how much to smooth in brightness 
contrast etc. with a slider control. 




The UK distributor, Argonaut 
Software, has had such demand that it 
estimatesthatinthefirstmonthonsale.it 
supplied 17% of all UK AMIGA users with 
Digiview. Buyers are mostly in 



'presentation' areas like advertising. 
Some come from outside the UK. An 
Indian TV company has brought several 
for titling. Jeremy San, Argonaut's 
MD, a well-known programmer himself 




//WW ST?W 



NGMEl 




presently working on an AMIGA version 
of 'Starglider' for Rainbird Software, 
could not let us keep a Digiviewfora full 
test as he had completely sold out his 
stock of Digiviews — except for the one 
he was using for titles and other aspects 
of 'Starglider'. We were, however, 
impressed by what we saw and on our 
preliminary viewing found Digiviewlived 
up to all claims made for it. 

We hope to return to it when we get 
our hands on a review copy. It looks a 
must for everyone involved in AMIGA 
graphics. 

Digiview Distributor — New Tek 
701 Jackson Suite B3 
Topeka, Kansas 66603 

UK Distributor — Argonaut Software 

1 29 The Broadway 

Mill Hill 

London NW7 4RN 

Tel. 01-959 0114 

UK price £199.00 plus VAT 









Commodore Business and AMIGA User 19 







<*&>£&* 



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NET LIST FROM SCHEMATIC 



'Gerber — trade mark of Gerber Scientific Instruments 

*Leroy — trade mark of Keuffel & Esser 

*IBM ~ trade mark of International Business Machines 

"AutoCAD — trade mark of Autodesk. Inc. 

'Amiga — trade mark of Commodore Business Machines 





merging from years of successful problem solving 
applications in piping , and electronics for the aerospace 
industry, DYNAMIC CAD has brought a highly advanced 
and powerful CAD system together with today's most dynamic and 
versatile micro-computer, the Amiga. DYNAMIC CAD takes full 
advantage of Amiga's extensive capabilities with color, multiple 
modes of resolution, mouse functions, and easily accessible 
pull-down menus. 

This is not some promised "vapor-ware." DYNAMIC CAD exists 
now and comes to the Amiga with a proven track record. The time 
and money-saving applications of DYNAMIC CAD for engineers and 
architects are truly astounding. Here is an advanced, 2-D drafting 
system with isometric capabilities that can be combined with many 
models of printers, plotters, and digitizers. In getting started you'll 
have the support of an extensive manual written in understandable 
English along with working examples as tutorial lessons. 

WHAT DYNAMIC-CAD CAN DO FOR YOG 




e-32UNC-2BX.2flO 



MECHANICAL DRAFTING 



• D:C gives you all the expected CAD func- 
tions of zooming, rotating, panning, group 
functions and menu driven features. 

• D*C brings you professional CAD capability 
tested and proven in the production of tens 
of thousands of drawings. 

• D"C will liberate you from the need to draw 
free hand. 

• D'C has net listing capability from your 
schematic. 

• Schematic comparison to your printed 
circuit artwork for continuity check. 

• D'C can produce isometric views. 

• Mil-Spec quality Leroy* J fonts. 

• Automatic line dimensioning. 

• D*C includes a series of information librar- 
ies: Symbols, Electronic Parts/Chips, Archi- 
tectural Components, Landscaping, etc. 



• Data base to store and retrieve information 
on parts specifications, vendors, and 
pricing. 

• Data base system utilizes ASCII format files 
which are convertable to other standards. 

• Capable of utilizing up to 4,096 colors. 

• D-C can generate over 8,000 layers. 

• D-C supports most standard dot matrix 
printers, ink jet, lazer jet, pen plotters, and 
the Gerber* Photoplotter. 




SYSTEM 

REQUIREMENTS 

512 K RAM 

2 Disk Drives (or) 

1 Drive and Hard Disk 

Printer or Plotter 

Inquiries invited. (818) 360-3715 



P.O. BOX 3475, GRANADA HILLS, CA 91344 



EUROPEAN 
DISTRIBUTOR 




Systems Limited 



Pier Road, North Feltham Trading Estate, Feltham, Middlesex TW14 OTT 

Tel: 01-751 6451 Telex: 934689 HABA G 




Expansion 

Memory 

Without 

The Wait. 



Introducing Alegra: The Amiga 
Memory Expansion Unit from 
Access Associates. 



TM 



512 K now. 

Now you can add 51 2 K bytes of external 
memory to your Amiga. In the smallest 
package available, a footprint only 
%"-wide. And Alegra's no-wait-state 
design lets your Amiga operate at its 
intended speed. No delays. With Alegra 
you get the benefit of fast memory at a 
surprisingly economical price. AND, 
BEST OF ALL, IT'S AVAILABLE NOW. 

Upgradeable to 2 MB later. 

If you'll need 2 MB of memory in the 
future, Alegra is still the right choice now. 
Our 2 megabyte upgrade (using 1, 
megabit DRAMs) will give you the 
memory you need in the same compact 
package. 

Ask for Alegra at your quality Amiga 
dealer. 



m-?m?mmmmzm 



: 




Total system memory is approximately 
1 meg with the addition of our 512 K 
Alegra (depending on specific 
hardware configurations). 



| ACCESS ASSOCIATES 

491 Aldo Avenue 

Santa Clara, CA 95054-2303 

408-727-8520 



Alegra features a 90 day parts and labor warranty against manufacturing defects. 



"■Amiga is a trademark of Commodore Amiga, Inc. 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIG/ 



INTUITION 

AMIGATechnical Manuals 



When the AMIGA software develop- 
ment machines first arrived in the UK in 
late 1985 a large number of manuals 
accompanied them. I think there were 
six covering various programming 
aspects of the machine. My initial impres- 
sion of these manuals was one of hor- 
ror when it was realised that the native 
language was C, which until then could 
hardly have been described as the most 
popular language in common use in this 
country. Software developers faced a 
double-edged problem in that they had 
to learn about the machine and simul- 
taneously learn C in order to get any- 
thing justifiable from the AMIGA. Nearly 
one year on, we can now look back with 
the benefit of hindsight, but I can still 
recall that sinking feeling. I'm sure I was 
not alone in feeling we had bitten off 
more than we could chew. 

Since the date of publication of these 
manuals there have been very many 
changes and consequently, the initial 
issues have been subject to drastic revi- 
sions. For example, the original ROM 
KERNAL MANUAL (the primary operat- 
ing system) has grown from a single 
weighty 400 + page tome for the now 
defunct Version 1.0 systems software 
into two volumes for the current Version 
1.1 systems software and these two 
volumes contain more pages each than 
the original single volume! 

Commodore-Amiga, the company 
responsible for the development of the 
AMIGA has very wisely made the soft- 
ware developers manuals available to 
the public. The exercise is being split 
between two USA publishers, Addison- 
Wesley and Bantam Books, each as 
exclusive publisher for some of the 
manuals. 

The INTUITION REFERENCE MAN- 
UAL, from Addison-Wesley covers a lot 
of ground in the course of its 350 pages. 
The manual is divided into two parts — 
the first being conventional text dealing 
with most aspects of INTUITION, the 
second forming a reference section to 
the various system callsor routines spe- 
cific to INTUITION. There are no less 
than 1 2 chapters with the first two being 
concerned with introducing the pro- 
grammer to the implementation and 
objectives of INTUITION. Some speci- 



men C programs are included to create 
a simple window and demonstrate the 
use of gadgets, the graphical devices for 
manipulating windows. I hope that 
these programs have been checked to 
see if they work properly — an awful lot 
of the programs in the software devel- 
oper editions of the AMIGA manuals did 
not! Another point worth bearing in 
mind with these manuals is the neces- 
sity to have access to the Lattice C com- 
piler, your learning curve will be pro- 
tracted if this is not the case. 

By chapter eight the reader should be 
getting a much better feel for input/out- 
put and this chapter covers the various 
techniques and principles used by the 
system software of the AMIGA. This 
chapter deals with message ports and 
the console device. Chapter nine serves 
as an introduction to the general gra- 
phics facilities of the AMIGA and reveals 
text, line drawing and images. The dis- 
play of the AMIGA is entirely bit- 
mapped and this has important implica- 
tions for text characters and their 
manipulation. In chapter ten the inpu- 
t/output facilities of the control ports, 
mouse and keyboard receive detailed 
attention whilst chapter eleven is con- 
cerned with other features of INTUI- 
TION such as the Preferences file. This 
chapteralso includes some useful notes 
for writing 68000 code in the context of 
INTUITION. The final chapter is a mis- 
cellany and is more a synopsis on the 
philosophy of INTUITION in terms of 
programming guidelines and consis- 
tency of appearance. 

The remaining half of the manual pro- 
vides full details of both the function 
calls and the necessary C program 
structures, as a complete listing of Ver- 
sion 1.1 INTUITION include files are 
provided. A detailed glossary and index 
finish off what is by any standards a 
comprehensive view of INTUITION. 
Potential purchasers should note that 
this is a technical manual and as such 
makes very little if any concessions to 
the beginner. Amongst the numerous 
assumptions made by the authors of this 
work are a working knowledge of the C 
language, some familiarity with the 
overall concept of the systems software, 
exposure to operating the AMIGA and 



not least, the Lattice C compiler. As they 
say in racing circles 'the going is rough' 
but the process of learning the AMIGA 
and its facilities is well worthwhile. An 
essential purchase if you intend to pro- 
gram professionally on the AMIGA. 

Getting a Guru 

Chapter's three and four cover the 
screens and windows respectively. An 
AMIGA screen can be customised in 
many ways and chapterthree deals with 
the design and use of these screens as 
well as standard screens. Windows are 
the principle means of gaining user 
input/output and chapter four is con- 
cerned with how to define and open 
windows according to the needs of the 
application. In chapter's five and six the 
reader is introduced to the first of the 
peripheral elements of INTUITION, the 
gadgets and menus. Gadgets forms the 
multi-purpose input/output devices 
which can be designed by the user 
before attachment to the windows and 
requesters. Similarly, menus are entirely 
at the disposal of the user in terms of 
design and chapter six looks at these 
and how the user's choice of options 
and commands are transmitted to the 
application. Requesters and alerts are 
dealt with in chapter seven. A requester 
is an extension of the gadget concept in 
terms of user input except that a reques- 
ter must be responded to. The alert is 
simply a visual mechanism of warning 
the user that there are serious problems 
within the system such as running out of 
memory, program corruption, an 
address-read error, etc. These condi- 
tions can traced by means of the by now 
famous guru meditation numbers which 
attempt to give the programmer an idea 
of where to look for the fault condition. It 
could be argued that such information is 
useless since it is portrayed essentially 
after the event. Coversely such informa- 
tion is better than nothing and usually 
the detractors of the alert system are 
those programmers who do not under- 
stand how the system software oper- 
ates. As owners and users of the AMIGA 
will testify, 'getting a guru' is quite a 
shaker the first time around! 
R. J. Michal & S. Deyl 
A ddison- Wesley 
Price: £23.95 



22 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



ADQSON-WESLEY 



▲ 



AMIGA Technical Reference Series 

Commodore Business Machines, Inc. in collaboration with Addison-Wesley publish a 
range of books which enables you to get more from your Amiga. Written by the people who 
designed the Amiga, this series is the definitive source of information on the- 

• user interface 

• internal design and architecture 

• built-in read-only memory (ROM) routines 



Amiga Hardware Reference Amiga Intuition Reference 
Manual Manual 

Provides a complete description of 
Amiga's user interface, Intuition, which is 
used to write application programs. 
Assumes a knowledge of assembly 
language and some familiarity with the C 
programming language. 
201 11076 8/374pp/Paper/£23.70 



Provides detailed descriptions of the 

graphics and audio hardware of the Amiga 

and explains its peripheral devices. 

Knowledge of assembly language is 

assumed. 

201 11077 6/325pp/Paper/£23.70 

Amiga ROM Kernel 
Reference Manual: 
Libraries and Devices 

Provides a complete listing and description 
of the Amiga's built-in read-only memory 
(ROM) routines which support graphics, 
sound, and animation. Assumes a 
knowledge of C and assembly language. 
201 1 1 078 4/1 248pp/Paper/£33.20 



Amiga ROM Kernel 
Reference Manual: Exec 

Provides a complete listing and 
description of the built-in read-only 
memory (ROM) routines which support 
Amiga's multiasking capabilities. Assumes 
a knowledge of C and assembly language. 
201 11099 7/281 pp/Paper/£23.70 



r 



ORDER FORM 



Please send me: 

11077 Hardware at £23.70 

11078 Libraries and Devices at £33.20 

11076 Intuition at £23.70 

11099 Exec at £23.70 



Please order from your local bookshop 
In case of difficulty order direct from 
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Addison-Wesley Publishers Ltd., Finchampstead Road, 
Wokingham, Berkshire RG11 2NZ. Tel: (0734) 794000. 



▲ 




ROCKFORT 



,l SI For Quality, 
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DISK STORAGE 



M.F. 50 Floppy Disk Box - Holds 50 5%tn 

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ROCKFORT 5_ y 4 jn DISKETTES 

10 - SS/DD 48tpi in MF.10 Box £1 1 95 

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Disks supplied in sleeves with write protect notch, hub rings, labels and carry 
lifetime guarantee. 



BBC MASTER SERIES 



Master 1 28K £460 00 

Master ET £389.95 

Econet Module £49.95 



DISK DRIVES 



Single 100KB 40tk w/o PSU £89 95 

Single 400KB 40/80 switchable w/o PSU £119 95 

Dual 800KB 40/80 switchable w/o PSU £229 95 



CENTRONICS Dot-Matrix Printers 

Centronics GLP II 100cps, 25NLQ, Ser, Par £159 85 

Horizon HPC-80 (Canon) 180cps, 34NLQ. Par £268.95 

All prices INCLUSIVE OF VAT and Carriage 
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ROCKFORT PRODUCTS 

81 Church Road, Hendon, London NW4 4DP 
Tel: 01-203 0191 




IN THE NORTH WEST 



GRANTHAMS specialize in 
commercial graphic applications 



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software, plotters, & image 



input devices for the designer 
printer and draftsman 



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Design & Reprographic Equipment 

I72 Corporation St Preston 

Teh 0772 50207 




Now do something really amazing with your Amiga . . . 



FutureSound 



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. . . Record! 



At last you can take full 
advantage of the sound capabilities 
of your Amiga. Applied Visions 
announces FutureSound, a digital 
sound recorder for the Amiga personal 
computer. With FutureSound, anyone 
can create the spectacular sound effects 
that make your Amiga stand out from 

-^APPLIED otner microcomputers. 
, FutureSound allows 
1 you to record any 
sound, any musical 
instrument, any voice, 




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and use these recordings to add 
instruments to music packages, create 
realistic sound effects for your programs 
or add true voices to your applications. 
Multitrack recording and editing is 
provided as well as stereo playback. 
Sounds can be easily accessed from "C" 
or BASIC. FutureSound comes complete 
with recorder, cables, microphone and 
software— all for only $175. Available 
from your Amiga dealer or directly from 
us. Order now and find out just how 
creative you and your Amiga can be! 



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PUT YOUR AMIGA TO WORK 



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• Integrate with virtually all existing hardware systems 
Companion software with identical user-interface for MS DOS, 
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Full complement of 23 math 
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and 13 logical operators. 
Automatic date and time 
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Data Entry • single entry to multiple files and records. Import/Export facility with data conversion/reorganization 
Forms Definition - full screen editor with mini word processor Report Generation - up to 6b lines x 13? columns 
6 level totaling with built in summary, Sort/Search - up to 26 selection criteria pei query Mass Editing, Time 
Saver Audit stores all key smokes used in building application to, a> .omatic recreation Statistics and Graphics- 
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Only rarely in the evolution of the 
microcomputer has truly great hardware 
been matched with truly productive 
software. Amiga meets Aegis. Software so 
intuitive the Amiga becomes limited only by 
your imagination. Aegis now has nine 
graphic reasons why you should be creating 
with Commodore's Creative Edge: 
Aegis Images™ 

The professional paint system for Amiga. Use 
Images as a graphics processor to produce 
renderings of buildings, design sets and 
costumes for theatre, create layouts and 
concepts in advertising, or artwork for 
custom Amiga programs. Use it anywhere art 
and design is created by hand. 

When combined with Genlock, Images 
can create mats and other video effects. If 
you pass paintings to Aegis Animator^yon 
can create a rolling slide show for demos or 
backgrounds and windows for animations. 

(See your dealer to find out about the trade- 
in value of your Graphlcraft or Deluxe 
Paint™ disks. You could receive a $50.00 
value graphics art kit free from Aegis!!) 



Aegis Animator™ 

A full feature metamorphic animation 
system. Use Animator to put your ideas in 
motion. Animator is the only graphics 
animation system that supports 3-D 
manipulations of objects. Create 
storyboards, enhance graphical 
presentations, or experiment with visual 
effects before committing them to traditional 
animation methods. Use paintings with Aegis 
Images, Grapbicraft™or other paint systems 
to produce continuous demonstrations. 
When used with Genlock you can produce 
special effects for video or animated titles 
and scrolling credits. 
Impact™ 

Impact creates business presentation 
graphics with finesse. Pie charts, bar graphs, 
icons, plots, and trends combined with a 
structured drawing system give you the 
visual edge to get your point across. Use 
Impact to produce rolling slide shows for 
trade show presentations, or to enhance 
verbal reports. The graphs and slides can be 
printed for use in written reports. 



Aegis Draw™ 

One of our hardest workers! It turns the 
Amiga into a low cost, powerful CAD 
workstation. Draw can be used in 
architecture to produce quality blueprints. 
The multi-layer feature is great for circuit 
board design, or creating technical plans for 
parts or sub-assemblies. Draw works in 
theatre for set design, movement mapping, 
and lighting layout. Use Draw for floor plans 
and "what if" space planning, organizational 
charts, or flow charts. 
Aegis Draw Pro™ 

Draw Pro is the professional big brother to 
Draw. Packed with additional features found 
in mini and mainframe CAD programs it can 
be used to produce very large sophisticated 
drawings. User definable menus and 
programability are just part of the key to Pro 
Draw's power. The attributes feature lets you 
produce a Bill of Materials, or pass data to 
analysis programs such as a database or 
spreadsheet. Pro Draw also has a Microsoft 
BASIC™ link for sending data to customized 
programs you've written youself! Aegis 



e 1985. 1986 Aegis Development, Inc. • Plotter courtesy Roland Corp. • JX-80 Printer courtesy Epson America • Monitor and Camera courtesy Sony Corp. • Digitizer courtesy K 1 Systems • Hard Disk courtesy Tecmar. 






■ 






■ ' ■ . . 








W 


IB 


f~Mm== 




Draw owners can upgrade to Pro Draw for a 

very reasonable cost. 

Diga!" 

Easy reliable multi-tasking 
Telecommunications that doesn't take a lot 
of memory away from your Amiga. Diga! is 
so easy to use, you'll wonder how you ever 
communicated electronically without it. 
Multiple terminal emulation, Amiga Binary 
and X-Modem protocols make Diga! reliable. 
Macros and address cards make Diga! 
powerful. So, the next time someone asks 
you which communications system you use, 
say "Diga!" 
ArtPak#l™ 

Ready to use clip art from computer master 
Jim Sachs. Art Pak images will work in paint 
and animation programs, including: Aegis 
Images, Aegis Animator, Graphicraft, Deluxe 
Faint™and Deluxe Video Construction Set™ 
Don't worry about not having professional 
skills, Art Pak puts years of experience into 
your paintings with a simple cut and paste! 
Art Pak#l includes prehistoric scenes, city 
scenes, and animals ready for use. 



Art Pak#2™ 

More ready-to-use art from Aegis artist Tom 
Nelson. His personal touch will lend a new 
level of creativity to your paintings and 
animations. Art Pak#2 includes trees, plants, 
nature settings, sports images, and a series of 
standard "clip art" for use by retailers, 
businesspeople, and anyone with need of 
graphic expertise. 
Arazok's Tomb™ 

Arazok's Tomb is a synergy of adventure and 
graphics. You are an ace reporter with the 
Herald Tribune and renowned investigator 
into the bizarre. A telegram from your 
sweetheart, Daphne Delmay leads you on a 
dangerous quest into the underground 
world ruled by the late and undead 
messenger from Hell, Arazok. 

"The nethermost caverns are not for the 
fathoming of eyes that see, for their marvels 
are strange and terrific. Cursed the ground 
where dead thoughts live new and oddly 
bodied, and evil the mind that is held by no 
head ..." Arazok's Tomb is recommended 
for adult players. 



Aegis Development — 
The number 1 choice in 
graphic software. 




JEGJS 



Development 



Santa Monica, California 



Modem courtesy Racal Vadic, Inc. 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



CAMBRIDGE 

LISP 

-A Complete 
Development System 



LISP is one of those programming lan- 
guages that are not seen very often in 
microcomputers. Yet it is one of the old- 
est languages around. Presumably be- 
cause the main outlet for LISP was and 
remains artificial intelligence, (Al), the 
language was felt to be inappropriate for 
8-bit machines with limitations on 
memory space, clock speeds, etc. But 
what is this mythical beast artificial intel- 
ligence of which we read so much 
about? It is an area of scientific research 
to provide computers with the ability to 
think — that is the machine has the abil- 
ity to reason or deduce after being given 
certain information about the problem. 
A conventional machine can only oper- 
ate within the confines of the variables 
within a program, an intelligent machine 
would be able to define its own operat- 
ing parameters for a given problem. 

The name LISP is short for LISt Pro- 
cessing language, which is a fairly accu- 
rate description of its appearance. A 
LISP program is very distinctive since it 
looks like no other language. For exam- 
ple, the following is a program fragment:- 

(TIMES (PLUS456) (DIFFERENCE42) 
(QUOTIENT 9 3) 

The equivalent in arithmetic terms is 

(4+5+6) * (4-2) * (9-3) 

If the above example was easy, then try 
this:- 

(DE UNIFY1 (e1 e2) 

(COND [ (EQ e1 e2)' (T) ] 
[ (VARel) 
(COND [ (NOT (OCCURS e1 e2)) 
(LIST T (LIST e1 e2)) ] 
[ (VAR e2) (LIST T (LIST e2 e1 )) ] )) 



OK, you get the point but LISP is cer- 
tainly no more difficult than learning 
another relatively new language to the 
Commodore world, namely C. But why 
bother with learning LISP if you have no 
interest in Al? Well LISP has the over- 
whelming advantage of screening the 
user from the machine itself and pro- 
vides the programmer with a consistent 
syntax and format. It is a symbolic lan- 
guage which offers considerable flexi- 
bility in program design and control of 
data flows. You can operate a LISP 
application within the LISP environment 
itself, a concept which lends itself read- 
ily to simulation. Scientific, mathemat- 
ics and engineering are the main appli- 
cations for LISP outside of Al. For 
example in engineering, LISP is used in 
control software for robots and for sym- 
bolic algebra in astro-mathematical 
applications. As you can see LISP is not 
some long-forgotten programming lan- 
guage from the backwaters, rather it is a 
powerful but specialised language which 
seems to suffer from a poor public rela- 
tions image. 

As is usual with so many computer 
languages LISP suffers from the dialect 
problem, although it must be said that 
portability is insurmountable and cer- 
tainly much less than that of the much 
vaunted portability of C. The Meta- 
comco version of LISP is the Cambridge 
derivative. Cambridge LISP is a devel- 
opment of a LISP implementation on an 
IBM 370 mainframe at Cambridge Uni- 
versity and Metacomco have translated 
this into a 68000 version. Of the four 
main groups of LISP dialects, namely 
INTER LISP, MACLISP, COMMON LISP 
and STANDARD LISP, Cambridge LISP 
follows STANDARD LISP the closest. I 



must admit from my own observations 
of LISP the differences tend to revolve 
around syntax such as subtract or dif- 
ference. Studying LISF from a book 
which is ostensibly for another dialect 
does not therefore present a serious 
problem provided trw> user applies 
common sense. 

The single disk form; t follows that of 
Metacomco's PASCAL for the AMIGA 
and can be transferred easily to hard 
disk or backed-up wi hout problems. 
The manual supplied vith Cambridge 
LISP is both very thorough and detailed, 
running to just under 200 pages. Again, 
similarto their PASCAL manual, there is 
little attempt at providing a tutorial 
although there are some example pro- 
grams present, the manual concen- 
trates on the huge range of LISP func- 
tions, since LISP is essentially about 
functions. An indication of the depth to 
which the manual reaches is the index 
which covers 9 pages! The standard ref- 
erence work on LISP which I use is LISP 
(2nd Edition) by P.R. Winston & B.K.P. 
Hall, published by Addison-Wesley 
(ISBN 0-201-08372-8). For over 400 
pages the cost in the UK is a very reaso- 
nable £14.95 — we plan to publish soon 
a review on several LISP books includ- 
ing this one. 

COMPLETE SYSTEM 

The implementation by Metacomco 
includes not only a LISP interpreter but 
compiler, thus this package could well 
serve as a complete software develop- 
ment system using LISP. Several parts 
of this version of Cambridge LISP make 
it an outstanding bargain for the price. 
The compiled and interpreted functions 



28 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



ISER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AM 



may be used on an interchange basis - 
this provides the means of a very rapid 
development cycle since a function may 
be tested before the commitment to a 
full-scale compile. The trace mode is 
operational on both compile or inter- 
preted code, again representing a time 
saving. Another very useful facility is 
that of being able to dump the core image 
to disk (note the mainframe terminol- 
ogy) after running the interpreter, thus 
allowing customised cores to be pre- 
served for future use. To some extent 
LISP is similar to FORTH in this respect 
although unlike FORTH, the user does 
not have to have the same degree of 
intimacy with the system hardware. 

LISP has been often criticised for 
being poor on mathematical applica- 
tions and yet this version supports float- 
ing point integers of any size! As a test of 
the strength of the maths capabilities I 
tried the following using the Cambridge 
LISP interpreter — calculate 2 raised to 
the power 5555. The time taken was 
circa 43 seconds and produced an 
integer number covering several screens. 
If you felt that this was not fast enough I 
substituted the 68000 cpu for an 8Mhz 



68010 cpu and the time was reduced to 
27 seconds! 

One of the key features of any LISP 
implementation is the ability to garbage 
collect This phenomena will be familiar 
to those readers who used the Commo- 
dore 64 where discarded strings could 
literally strangle the machine to a halt 
until the operating system took it upon 
itself to go through the memory and 
delete the unwanted strings. Cambridge 
LISP caters for full garbage collection 
and avoids tieing down memory unne- 
cessarily. The diagonstic messages from 
the intepreter are clear and withthe aid 
of the manual mean debugging is merci- 
fully short before compilation. Recur- 
sion and function composition means 
the programmer can design the applica- 
tion on a top-down basis — an impor- 
tant point for both a multi-tasking envir- 
onment and those who are new to the 
AMIGA as a machine. 

There is one drawback to Cambridge 
LISP, it requires plenty of RAM in which 
to operate — a minimum of 300k. This is 
a characteristic on any LISP implemen- 
tation, in that LISP will attempt to soak 



up the maximum amount available of 
memory resource. However, since most 
AMIGA sold now in W Europe and else- 
where have 512k of RAM as standard 
then this presents no real problem. 
Indeed with my own expanded machine 
of 2.5MB, Cambridge LISP took in the 
region of 1 .75MB which still left me 750k 
free for other applications. 

So why purchase Cambridge LISP? 
Well the first point is that LISP is not 
only a language of the future but is likely 
tobeastrongcandidateasTHE language 
of the future in one shape or form. 
Secondly, LISP is undoubtedly a power- 
ful language in skilled hands although it 
seems to suffer from an identity problem 
which I feel is both unrealistic and 
unfair. Finally, the cost of acquiring 
what is a complete LISP development 
system at the price currently being 
offered by Metacomco is a bargain in 
anyone's language. 

UK Supplier: Metacomco PLC. 
26 Portland Square 
BRISTOL BS2 8RZ 
Tel. 0272 428781 
Price: £149.95 



PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 



FORTHE 



AMIGA 




NOW AVAILABLE 



NEW 



NEW 



-the authors of 
AmigaDOS. 



MCC Pascal -Compiler I 

Cambridge Lisp - Interpreter/Compiler 
Lattice C- Compiler 
Metacomco Amiga Toolkit 
Metacomco Amiga Shell 




PLEASE CONTACT US DIRECT FOR MORE INFORMATION OR DETAILS OF YOUR NEAREST DEALER OR DISTRIBUTOR 

26 Portland Square, Bristol BS2 8RZ, UK.Tel:(0272) 428781 Telex: 444874 METACO G 
5353E Scotts Valley Drive, Scotts Valley, California 95066, USA. 
Telephone: 1-800-252-6382 

LEADING THE FIELD IN 68000 SYSTEMS SOFTWARE 




© METACOMC0 1986 



Trademarks: AmigaDOS: CBM Inc., Lattice C: Lattice Inc. 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 29 




IN THE MIDLANDS 

V Supplies ofAmigas to industry, education, business 
and personal users. 

•J One year warranty including on site maintenance. 

-J Large range of software already available, 
including technical reference manuals. 

•J Technical support from people who hae been using 
Amigas for over 18 months. 

V Over 30 megabytes of Public Domain programs 
already available, free to all Amiga owners. 

\J Just 100 yards from Leicester Railway station on the 
A6. 

\J Over 1000 software titles for all Commodore 
computers. 

V Inkjet, dot matrix and daisywheel printers for all 
models. 

\J Books, papers and disks for all models - in fact 
everything you need for any Commodore. 

\J The only dealer in the U.K. to support all 
Commodore products. 

V Run by Commodore enthusiasts - at your service. 

cavendish 
commodore centre 

66 London Road, Leicester LE2 OQD 
Tel: 0533 550993 












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FEATURES 

Over 2,000 Questions 

Top 20 Hi-Score Table 

Spoken Prompts 

Custom Disk Maker Program 

Educational version supplied 

Extra Data Disks available 

rOQ QC AVAILABLE 
J.£%l.^il FROM SEPT 15th 

IN YOUR LOCAL AMIGA STORE 

or direct from: 

EMIGMA DEVELOPMENTS 

66 London Road, Leicester. 
Tel: (0533) 550993 



ftMIGA 

Users 

Group 



* Bimonthly Newsletter 

* Technical Information 

* Discount on all products 

* Users Bulletin Board 

* Problem Solving — Software & 
Hardware 

* Allied with U.S.A. Amiga Groups 

* Special introductory modem offer 

* Send for details 

AMIGA USERS GROUP 

66 London Road, Leicester LE2 OQD 
or Tel: (0533) 550993 



MARAUDER £39.95 

The premier disk back-up utility — backs up 
nearly every Amiga software disk. Easy to 
use — full mouse control. Protects your 
valuable softwre investment. 

GRABBVT £29.95 

Print or save any screen, from any program, 
any time. Uses only 10K. A really powerful 
tool. Supports IFF. Easy to install on all your 
Amiga disks. 

CHESSMATE £2 9 95 

The ultimate in computer chess. Spectacular 
graphics. 2D or 3D. You vs Amiga. You vs 
Friend. Amiga vs Amiga. Multiple skill levels. 
Game clocks. Book moves. Displays move 
list. Suggests moves. Save game. Speaks 
moves. Master games and problems 
included. Plus much more. 

NOW AVAILABLE 

at Cavendish Commodore Centre 

66 London Road, Leicester LE2 OQD 

or Tel: 0533 550993 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



These days, $2,500 will get you a sleek 
new Group 3 facsimile machine from 
any of half-a-dozen vendors. Priced at 
less than one-quarter of what compara- 
ble equipment was selling for five years 
ago, some of the new machines will 
transmit a page-worth of electronic mail 
across the world in 15 seconds or less. 
More than a half-million desks in the 
U.S. now have fax machines on them, 
according to a new 202-page report 
from International Resource Develop- 
ment Inc., a Norwalk, CT-based market 
research and consulting firm. But more 
than eight million desks have personal 
computers on them, and for the secre- 
taries, professionals, managers and 
technicians with personal computers, 



WANTED - LOTS 
MORE SOFTWARE! 

Most of the PC scanners and image 
processing systems currently on the 
market can handle virtual facsimile 
transmission, but the user may have to 
go through a number of cumbersome 
steps in order to explain to his PC 
exactly where the image is to be sent, 
then explain to the PC at the receiving 
end exactly how to print out the image. 
"There's a real shortage of software for 
virtual fax," says Buffham. "The whole 
thing works easiest with the scanners 
which were designed with virtual fax in 
mind, rather than CAD/CAM, OCR, or 



other image-processing applications," puter image processing equipment, the 



simile — other vendors have adopted a 
variety of different resolutions. Canon's 
scanner works at 300 dots-per-inch, the 
same as the company's laser printers. 
The IBM scanners are mostly geared for 
240 dots-per-inch, but certain coarser 
resolutions can be handled, too. "The 
IBM scanners aren't compatible with 
Group 3 facsimile; however they will 
probably fit into a Group 4 environment 
because Group 4 printers are supposed 
to be able to deal with 240 dots-per- 
inch, even though Group 4 transmission 
is geared to 400 dots-per-inch," explains 
Buffham. 

While virtual facsimile will be an 
important application of personal com- 



VIRTUAL FACSIMILE 



fax capability doesn't need to cost 
$2,500. 

Accounting to the IRD report, more 
than 30 suppliers are now offering 
scanners or cameras for personal com- 
puters, able to scan and digitize an 
image of any document, and transmit it 
to a remote destination. These scanners 
range in price from $200 to $15,000, 
depending upon resolution, features 
and capability, and facsimile vendors 
"sat up and took notice" when IBM 
entered the PC scanner market in June 
with an announcement of two 
Japanese-built PC scanners, according 
to Jean Buffham of the IRD research 
staff. 

FAX VENDORS "WIPING 
THEIR EYES" 

The IRD product-planning consulting 
staff has been visited by a "steady pro- 
cession of Japanese fax product 
planners, wiping their tears from their 
eyes on the well-pressed sleeves of their 
dark bluesuit jackets," reports Buffham. 
The potential competition from low- 
cost PC scanners first began to worry 
the fax vendors three years ago, but now 
it is having the first real market impact 
and "they don't know what to do about 
it," comments Buffham. The fax market 
worldwide has been growing rapidly 
during the past three years, and most 
U.S. and European manufacturers "have 
long been driven out of the business by 
aggressive Japanese pricing and abso- 
lutely super Japanese products," ac- 
cording to the IRD report. "But it's the 
U.S. vendors who are currently making 
the running in the PC scanner field," 
explains Buffham, noting that "even 
when the scanners are made in Japan, 
as IBM's and Pitney Bowes' are, most of 
the remainder of the PC system is, in 
general, U.S.-built." 



according to the IRD staff, who single 
out Chorus Data Systems (Merrimack, 
NH), Dest Corporation (Milpitas, CA), 
Pitney Bowes (Stamford, CT) and AT&T 
as having systems particularly easily 
used for virtual fax. 



IRD report explains that the PC image 
processing user "will typically regard 
virtual fax as just one of his graphics 
related applications". The report reviews 
all of the current and expected future 
applications of the technology, predict- 



Fax without 

a Fax 



GammaLink (Palo Alto, CA) has a 
unique PC add-on board which allows 
personal computers to talk to facsimile 
machines, and vice-versa, thus linking 
the world of virtual facsimile with the 
world of conventional facsimile mac- 
hines, and vice-versa, thus linking the 
world of virtual facsimile with the world 
of conventional facsimile. 

THE BLUE CLOUD - 
DOES IT HAVE A 
SILVER LINING? 

Describing the IBM entry into the 
world of virtual facsimileas a blue cloud 
overhanging the billion-dollar facsimile 
business, the IRD report points out that 
there may be a silver lining to this cloud, 
in the form of increased facsimile usage 
as a result of the much-larger popula- 
tion of machines (both conventional fax 
machines and personal computers) 
which can send and receive image traf- 
fic. Conceiably, this could boost interest 
in fax, and trigger more purchases of fax 
machines by folks who don't already 
have personal computers; however, "the 
PC users are going to go for the 
scanners, and not for fax machines," 
assets Buffham. 

While vendors such as Wang and 
AT&T have provided their PC image 
processing systems with 200 dots-per- 
inch modes — the same as Group 3 fac- 



ing that today's $340 million market for 
PC Image Processing hardware and 
software will leap past the$3 billion level 
by 1990. 

Further details on the $1 ,850.00 report 
VIRTUAL FACSIMILE & PC IMAGE 
CAPTURE/TRANSMISSIO/PROCES- 
SING' including free table of contents 
and description, are available from IRD 
at 6 Prowitt Street, Norwalk, CT 06855 
U.S.A.; Telephone (203) 866-7800; Telex 
64 3452. 



Conventiona 


vs. 


Virtual 


Facsimile 


Users 


1986-96 


U.S. 




1986 


1988 1991 1996 




(thousands of units) 


Conventional facsimile 






New placements 


180 


130 90 70 


Year-End Installed Base 


540 


750 800 700 


Number of units in active use 


330 


450 600 500 


(year end) 






Virtual facsimile 






New placements (scanners) 


20 


300 450 400 


Year-End Installed Base 


40 


450 1,300 1,700 


Number of units in active use 


30 


200 600 900 


(year end) 






Total 






New placements 


200 


430 540 470 


Year-End Installed Base 


580 


1,200 2,100 2,400 


Number of units in active use 


360 


650 1,200 1,400 


(year end) 






(SOURCE: INTERNATIONAL 


RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT INC.) 707 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 






Infominder 




Preview 



We have decided to make a break with 
tradition and preview a piece of software 
which I believe is unparalleled. It arrived 
shortly before Commodore Business 
and AMIGA User went to the printers. 
However, only does it fully exploit many 
of the hardware facilities of the AMIGA, 
but the approach it takes and what it can 
achieve for the user easily qualifies this 
product for the accolade of so far the 
Most Innovative AMIGA Software of 
1986. So what is about INFOMINDER 
that causes us to wax lyrical about it. 
INFOMINDER is, we believe unique. 
INFOMINDER is an information man- 
ager a system which allows extremely 
fast retrieval of text and graphical infor- 
mation. But this is not done through the 
conventional database management 
system of defining rigid fields, records 
and file structures — rather by using the 
inbuilt hierarchical directory structures 
of AmigaDOS. 

INFOMINDER will take a text docu- 
ment created by the user and use it as 
the basis of a topic. Various compo- 
nents of you r text can be made into sub- 
topics and related to other documents. 
For example, let's take the subject of 
english railway history. The key docu- 
ment would be a general introduction:- 

Introduction 

Railways in the UK were first started 
through the driving force of one man, 
George Stephenson. He originated from 
the Tyneside area of England and 




worked in the coal mining industry. His 
early experiments were financed by a 
group of colliery owners named the 
Grand Allies, the most prominent 
member being the Earl of Londonderry. 
Stephenson built on the knowledge of 
using steam as a prime mover from 
James Watts. 

Throughout this document several 
potential topics have emerged which I 
have underlined. The first one relates to 
Stephenson, the second to Tyneside 
and so on. By creating another docu- 
ment specifically dealing with these 
subtopics a complete information struc- 
ture can be erected, supplemented if 
necessary with graphic screens from a 
paint package such as Aegis DRAW or 
Deluxe PAINT. The information within 
each document can be compiled by 
INFOMINDER and together with user- 
defined help screens provides an envir- 
onment which allows very quick cross- 
referencing. 

There are three elements to INFO- 
MINDER — a display facility, informa- 
tion compiler and finally an online help 
facility. Most users will probably restrict 
themselves to the display facility 
although application developers will 
make full use of the system. Some 
potential applications for INFOMINDER 



could be in a teaching environment — 
learning how to operate a complex 
piece of machinery; as an online refer- 
ence library of book abstracts, phyco- 
logical testing by analysis of user selec- 
tions and responses to images; criminal 
investigations by cross-references to 
criminal's modes of operation, and the 
list can go on. INFOMINDER will even 
allow the Narrator device to speak the 
text within the document. Couple this 
with the ability of the Narrator to use 
phonemes and thus speech idioms and 
foreign language narration and you 
begin to appreciate some of this pro- 
ducts potential. 

Time has precluded any in-depth 
investigation of INFOMINDER — what 
we hae seen so far has left us aston- 
ished. In the next issue there will be a full 
review, meanwhile if you have an oppor- 
tunity to purchase this software then our 
advice is to do so and be quick about it 
— the word is going around! 



Supplier: BYTE BY BYTE Inc. 

3736 Bee Cave Road. Suite 3 

AUSTIN TX. 78746 

USA 

Tel. (415) 964-1860 



32 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 




THE 



DATABASE 



,^^^H J Precision Software Limited 

^^^™^™~ 6 Park Terrace 

PrPPI SlOn Worcester Park , Su rrey KT4 7 JZ 

ii^ioiuii Telephone: 01-330 7166 

C3»OrtWare Telex: 8955021 . PRECIS G 



£149« 

incVAT 



First in a new generation of database systems, Superbase Personal 
benefits from the latest ideas in ease of use - pull -down menus, 
multiple windows, point-to-click selections - as well as the full power 
of relational database management. 
Easy to set up 

Type in your field names, add details like length or date style. With the 
easy-to-understand menu selections and control panels, you can create a 
database in minutes. What's more, you can alter your formats at any time 
without disturbing the data already held on file. 

Manage your data 

Superbase displays your data in easy-to-read tables or page by page in 
Form view. There's practically no limit to the number of fields in a record, but 
you have full control over what you choose to show. Select fields, select 
index, then use VCR style controls to view your data - fast forward, rewind, 
pause or stop - it's as easy as playing a tape. A unique Filter system lets you 
select and work with any category of records from your file. 

Working power 

Define reports and related queries across multiple files, with multiple 
sort levels if you need them. Import data from other databases or 
applications. Export data to your word processor or join several files to form 
a new database. The advanced B+ tree file structure and disk buffering 
ensure high performance - Superbase reads a typical name and address 
record in less than three hundredths of a second. 

The Picture Database 

Use Superbase's special picture reference facility and powerful data 
handling to create a unique picture/data library application. You can even run 
an automatic slide show. 





Yes! Its here at last, after months of 
speculation. In the September issue of 
CCS we carried a preview of this amaz- 
ing game, brought to you from the 
secret headquarters of a company whose 
name still remains in a top security vault 
in the depths of the Bank of England. 

Marble Madness has been awaited by 
the Amiga fraternity ever since the 
machine was released, over a year ago 
in the US. Since the announcement of 
the game was made by Electronic Arts, 
Amiga owners, and prospective Amiga 
owners alike have been waiting with bat- 
ted breath for its release. 

Marble Madness first appeared as an 
arcade game from Atari Games Corpo- 
ration in the spring of '85. It immediately 
created a cult following, with huge 
amounts of cash being slotted into the 
unsatiable maws of these machines. 
The game featured an amazing stereo 
sound track, and truly stunning 3D gra- 
phics. It was also a totally original con- 
cept, which probably also helped con- 
siderably in the game's popularity. Up 
until this point, Electronic Arts had 



fe,. 


A 


f J^~ tss& 





vowed never to copy an idea from 
another game, or to do arcade conver- 
sions. The very fact that they broke this 



written for the Commodore 64 (due out 
in October). 

Nobody can really pinpoint what 
makes this game so compulsive and 
addictive, although many suggestions 
have been made. Some say it is because 
of the marvellous sound track that 
seems to hold you to the game, some 
the movements of the ball. A suggestion 
was even made that it was because of 
the 'cute' way the ball falls apart when it 



crashes, although I don't think this is 
very likely. 

Marble Madness on the Amiga is the 
first arcade conversion on any compu- 
ter to live up to the original. All the fea- 
tures are there, including the stereo 
sound track, the 3D graphics, and the 
excellent sound effects. It is in fact a lot 
easier than the arcade version, although 
you may change your mind on this point 
if you play at Level 7! Two players can 

red ball, and the other the blue ball. 
Unfortunately it must be said that with 
two players, game-play does tend to 
slow down a bit, and both players expe- 
rience a slight lessening of control. 
However, you soon get used to this, and 
normal play resumes! The two-player 
games are very different to one-player 
games. For a start, speed is reduced and 
of course besides Steelie, the black ball 
who constantly harasses you, you have 
the other player to contend with! Some 
of the paths are very narrow, and the 
only recourse is to knock the player off 
the playfield . . . 

The 1,000 levels previously rumoured 
are, in fact, only 6. Level 5 is the 'Silly 
Level' where 'everything you know is 
wrong i' ramps going down have 'upward 
pull' and vice versa, so going down is 
like going up, and going up like going 
down! It all gets very confusing . . . The 
final level combines all the obstacles of 
the previous 5 levels into an incredibly 
difficult finale. Finish this, and you're 
good! 

The various screens go up in difficulty 
with every screen-change. Screen One 
is just a practice, with no obstacles. If 
you can't finish this, then there's some- 



thing definitely wrong with you! In 
Screen Two Steelie makes his first 
appearance, trying to knock you off into 
the abyss. The deadly Marble Munchers 
show themselves here too, first stunning 
you so you can't move when your mar- 



ble's hit one, and then leaping up, 
mouths, if they can be called that, wide 



A few bugs have crept in, although 
that is only to be expected in a game of 
this size and complexity. They do not 
affect game-play in any way at all, but 
are merely cosmetic. The ball when it 
falls behind an object sometimes appears 
in front of it. This only happens when 
you die, so there's no cause for concern 
there! Apart from that small gripe, I have 
no complaints about this game what- 
soever. It is a gem of a program, and 



accurately captures the essence of the 
arcade game. The sound has been done 
very well, especially if you are lucky 
enough to have stereo speakers to get 
the full effect. Each screen has its own, 
original sound track which matches the 
type of screen you are playing. The Silly 
Level has silly music accompanying it, 
and some very nice squelchy sound 
effects. Every screen seems to have its 
own individual personality which is 
presented by the obstacles you face, the 
colour, and the music and sound effects. 
It is impossible not to enthuse about this 
game, and even the most hardened 
sceptics of the Amiga almost gasped in 
awe when they saw this game. This is 
one of the few games about which I can 
honestly say to people 'go out and buy 
it, whatever the price', and the price is 
probably going to be a pretty sum! In tne 
UK, Marble Madness is due to be mar- 
keted by Ariolasoft, along with a lot of 
Electronic Art's other products. It will 
come in a squashed video-cassette type 
box, with an almost complete lack of 
documentation! After all, there isn't a lot 



first worked on CAD/CAM for Xerox, 
and later at Versatec. He has worked on 
several Electronic Arts games in the 
past, and most recently of course, Mar- 
ble Madness. 

He signed a contract about a year 
ago, to produce this legendary arcade 

adness Marble 



game for Commodore's 6800 machine. 
The game has been in development ever 
since. Although some may wonder why 
it took so long, take a minute to think 
how difficult a task it is to program a 
game like MM! 

The original arcade machine game 
was written 95% in 'C, and ran on a 
68000 processor (as the Amiga) with a 
great deal of specialist graphics hard- 
ware. What Larry had to do to port the 



game across to the Amiga was to emu- 
late a lot of this hardware in software. 
Consequently, the processor is spend- 
ing a lot of time emulating this hard- 
ware, which slows down other opera- 
tions. So when the game is being played 
at high speeds, the scrolling becomes 
temporarily jerky because the proces- 
sor can't keep up. 

The Amiga version is also written in 
'C; in fact, 90% of it is written in 'C! This 



is quite an achievement considering 
how slow, in comparison with straight 
code, 'C is. Some of the graphics rou- 
tines are written in code, but apart from 
these everything else is in 'C. 

In the US, Marble Madness has taken 
the Amiga fraternity by storm. Stores 
are selling them as fast as they can get 
their hands on them, and just like us, all 
the US magazines are enthusing over it. 
We will permit ourselves just this one 
little ego-boost; CCI was the first maga- 
zine in the world to preview this amazing 
game, even before all the American 
magazines. A little achievement of our 
own. Not much, however, compared to 
the admiration we are sure you will feel 
when you play Marble Madness yourself. 



of explaining you CAN do with this 
game — simply get out there, avoid 
everything, touch nothing except the 
surface, and get to the goal as fast as 
possible! Once you've done that, well 
there's nothing for it but to try to do it 
again . . . and again . . . and again . . . and . 



; 



Shortly before we went to press, we 
managed to interview the author of 
Amiga Marble Madness, Larry Reed. 

Larry has been involved in program- 
ing ever since he was in high school. He 



CCI AMIGA leisure CCI AMIGA leisure CCI AW 



lectronic Arts 



One-on-One is a basketball simulation, 
featuring two of America's mosttalented 
basketball players, Julius Irving and 
Larry Bird represented on-screen. You 
can control either one of these, with the 
Amiga controlling the other, or alterna- 
tively, two players can compete. If you 
want to just sit back and watch, the 
computer can play itself. This can pro- 
vide a useful insight into what tactics to 
employ as each, if computer controlled, 
have their own style of play, guides to 
which are provded on the packaging in 
the form of game design comments. 

The Amiga has the shooting-percent- 
ages for each player stored. It also 
knows their favourite shots, and their 
shooting positions. So playing as J. Irv- 
ing will be different from playing as L. 
Bird. Dr. J., as he's called, is quicker on 
his feet than Larry, and tends to employ 
fancy footwork. Because of his light- 
ness, he can jump higher and stay up in 
the air longer. Larry, who is heavier, is a 
better rebounder, and is intimidating 



Dr J l39 E 20 



when on the defensive because of his 
size and power. Knowing these facts, 
and using them to full advantage can 
really help you win in this game. Unfor- 
tunately, it does take quite a long time to 
use them instinctively. If you have to stop 
and think 'now what do I do next?' then 
you're sunk, and another two points get 
added to your opponents score! 

One-on-One takes into account fouls, 
and lists reasons for fouling for the non- 
basketball player. You might also get a 
'hot streak' when you know you just 
can't miss. The computer decides when 
you get these, so you'll have to sense it! 

Of course, even pixels get tired of 
running and jumping all over the screen, 
so the fatigue bar will tell you what state 
you are in physically. To regain strength, 
dribble slowly or call a time out. Fatigue 
will really affect your performance in the 
game. Tired players don't shoot as well, 
or perhaps more importantly, defend as 
well. 




The game also contains a number of 
humorous additions. If you shoot the 
ball hard enough, then the backboard 
shatters, and a little man comes along 
and sweeps up the debris. After a par- 
ticularly good shoot, the computer will 
show an action replay. The manual 
gives a good, if short introduction to 
offensive and defensive moves, and 
some useful shooting tips. 

Some really brilliant sound effects are 
included. It sounds as if Electronic Arts 
went along to a real basketball match 
and actually digitised all the sounds that 
were going on. If you listen carefully you 
can even hear a guy in the background 
selling hotdogs! The graphics aren't too 
stunning, and I'm sure they could have 
been vastly improved, but the game has 
'feel' to it, which is what makes it so 
enjoyable to play. 

UK Distributor: Ariolasoft: £29.95 



SHOT 
24 




ts • 



JlXTvw s 



^EfvTnSf 



Snc* ^ 31 



AC/FORTRAN 



Mainframe quality, full feature ANSI FORTRAN 77 

compiler includes: Debugger, Linker, Library Manager, 
Runtime Library, IEEE math, and C interface. Supports 
Complex numbers, Virtual arrays, Overlays and Dynamic 
Linking. Not copy protected. $295. 



Version with support for CSA 



board also available. 



AC/BASIC™ -Coming Soon 



From the authors of Microsoft BASIC compiler for Macintosh, 
comes AC/BASIC for the Amiga. Companion compiler to the Amiga 
BASIC interpreter: has more features and includes a Debugger, 
includes BLOCK IF, CASE statement, and STATIC keyword 
extensions and executes up to 50x faster. AC/BASIC is the new 
BASIC reference for MC68000 based personal computers. Not copy 
protected. $295. 

Telephone orders welcome 



absisft 

Scientific/Engineering Software 

4268 N. Woodward, Royal Oak, Michigan 48072, USA 
(313) 549-7111. Telex: 235608 

Amiga trademark of Commodore/ Amiga. Microsoft trademark of Microsoft Corp. 



■■M^~ 




i Road, North Feltham Trading Estate. Feltham, Middlesex TW14 OTT 
Tel: 01-751 5451 Telex: 934689 HA8A G 



<^> 



C Compilers, 
Development Tools 



Lattice 



Roundhill can supply a full range of 
programming tools for the Amiga. In 
addition to the Lattice C compiler, which 
allows direct calling of all Amiga functions, 
we stock Lattice's 'make' program (LMK), the 
Lattice Screen Editor (LSE), text processing 
utilities, file access library (dBC III) and 
MacLibrary (which helps you to transfer 
Apple Macintosh applications). The Lattice 
Amiga C compiler is available to run either 
on the Amiga itself or for cross-development 
under MS-DOS. 

Other products for Amiga include our 
PANEL screen manager, Faircom's C-Tree 
indexed file manager, and the Metascope 
multi-window symbolic debugger from 
Metadigm. Roundhill also supplies MS-DOS 
development tools from Lattice and Phoenix. 

Roundhill Computer Systems Limited 
Axholme, London Road, 
Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1LR 

(0672) 54675 




THE MIRROR 

DISK COPIER 

$49.95 



The Mirror Disc Copier is Amiga 
computer's most powerful disk copier. 
Specially designed to back up heavily 
protected disks, to date it's 100% 
successful. Completely automatic. No 
knowledge of Amiga Dos required. 

Our liberal update policy lets you 
make backup copies even when protec- 
tion schemes change. Works on single 
or dual drive systems. Don't take 
chances with your expensive software. 
Back it up with the Mirror disk copier! 

Also Available! 

The Mirror 'Hacker' Package 

For serious disk analysis 

MasterCard, Visa, M.O. or check + $3 shipping and han- 
dling. C.O.D. or foreign orders add $3. California orders 
add 6% sales tax. 



Write or call 



Compumed 




(408) 758-2436 

P.O. Box 6939 

Salinas, CA 93912 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



AC/FORTRAN 



MICRO: AMIGA - Minimum 256K & 
One disk drive $245.00 
What was the first High-level language? 
What was the first language to be stan- 
dardised by a national standards body 
(ANSI)? From what language was BASIC 
originally derived? The answer to all 
these questions is FORTRAN. So, as 
you can see, FORTRAN had a very good 
start to life. It was developed by IBM and 
released to the public in 1957. Up until 
then most programming was done in 
either assembly language or was hand 
coded. FORTRAN was primarily intended 
for engineering and scientific use and 
was designed to handle problems 
involving large sets of formulae and 
complex numerical computation. It is 
from this that its name was contrived 
FORmula TRANslation. FORTRAN is 
not an interpreted language like BASIC 
but is of the compiler variety. What this 
means is that in order to run a pro- 
gramme it is first necessary to compile 
it. This involves a resident programme 
examining each command and state- 
ment and translating them into machine 
language. Some of the benefits of a 
compiled programme are a much faster 
run time, a more efficient programme 
and lower memory requirements at run 
time. As a Micro user the only major 
drawback comes when your programme 
fails to f uction properly and you need to 
reload the source code, edit it and 
recompile it each time. 

Due to FORTRAN'S widespread 
acceptance and use it became neces- 
sary to agree on standardization. Hav- 
ing standard versions of computer lan- 
guages enables a program written for 
one type* of computer to be run on a 
different type of computer, assuming 
that the same language is available for 
both. The first FORTRAN standards 
were set in 1966 and from these came 
FORTRAN IV, often referred to as 
FORTRAN 66. Overthe years numerous 
extensions to the basic language became 
available and standardization was again 
required. In 1977 the new standard 
FORTRAN 77 was formalised. At the 
date of writing this was still the current 
version. 

Absoft's AC/FORTRAN is a full im- 
plementation of FORTRAN 77 (it can 
also handle FORTRAN 66 programmes) 
but with the addition of numerous 
extensions to permit access to some of 



by Absof t 



the AMIGA'S amazing capabilities. It 
comes on a double sided 3.5 inch Micro 
Floppydisk and is accompanied by a 
170 page ring bound binder containing 
three manuals. The largest of these is 
simply entitled "AC/FORTRAN" and is 
intended as a reference guide for the 
use of the Absoft implementation of 
FORTRAN 77. This is subdivided into 4 
parts. An introduction, the compiler, the 
debugging aid and programming in 
FORTRAN. It is not, however, intended 
as a tutorial. A list of several books suit- 
able for learning FORTRAN is included 
in the bibliography at the rear of the 
manual. The second Manual consists of 
additional information on the compiler, 
the linker (a programme which links in 
external procedures to a programme), 
the debugger and documentation on a 
few external FORTRAN subroutines. 
The first manual is the "FORTRAN 77 
Amiga interface Manual". This is proba- 
bly going to be the most important one 
of all to the dedicated Amiga freak as it 
covers a FORTRAN procedure called 
"amiga.sub" through which access is 
given to almost all of the AMIGA'S ROM 
routines including the graphics, Dos, 
exec and intuition libraries. The source 
code of this procedure has been pro- 
vided should anyone care to understand 
its operation or even enhance it. 

When writing a programme in AC/ 
FORTRAN the first thing to do is to 
create a source file. This is done using 
the system editor "Ed". One problem 
you may encounter here is that "Ed" is 
not documented in the literature supp- 
lied by either Commodore or Absoft. 
The source file has to be written in a 
predefined format. This is due primar- 
ily to its ancestry. Programmes were 
originally entered into computers by 
means of punched cards. These cards 
were set out as 80 columns by 12 rows. 
Each column represented one charac- 
ter and each character would be select- 
ed by punching holes in the relevant 
rows. i.e. the letter "A" would be 
represented by punching holes in rows 
12-0-1-9. I happen to know that several 
of the big high street banks still use 
punch cards to a limited extent to this 
very day. The format required by FOR- 
TRAN is as follows: Statements must 
begin in column 7, while columns 1 to 5 
are reserved for statement numbers. 
Column 6 is used to indicate that it is a 
continuation of the previous line. Once 



we have finished writing our source file 
(deck) we need to compile it. This is 
achieved by typing 'F77' followed by 
any options required and then the 
name of the source. The options are a 
means by which extra commands can 
be passed to the compiler, i.e. "-A" will 
generate an assembler source code, 
while "-K" will disable case signifi- 
cance. There are nineteen options in 
total. More than one option may be 
used at once. i.e. "-ABC". Depending 
on what options were selected the 
compiler will, on completion, display 
the amount of memory used. If the 
compiler was successful it will show 
the elapsed time and the lines per min- 
ute compiled. If all went well we would 
now have a file which can be loaded 
and executed. What do we do if the 
programme does not work? We have to 
track down the error/s and fix them. 
This we can do with the aid of the 
debugging tool DEBUG. This is a 
screen orientated symbolic debugging 
tool for FORTRAN programmes and 
external procedures. It provides for 
executing single statements, setting 
breakpoints, executing blocks of state- 
ments and examining and modifying 
the contents of programme variables. 
Very useful. 

Conclusion 

AC/FORTRAN is a full implementation 
of ANSI FORTRAN 77 but with the abil- 
ity to make full use of some of the AMI- 
GA'S outstanding attributes. It gives 
near machine code speed whilst retain- 
ing a high level language's ease of use. I 
do feel, however, that the manuals could 
have been better. They leapt straight 
into the technical stuff without covering 
the basics. I found the last manual to be 
of the most use with the first being the 
least. Incorporating a step by step guide 
on the birth to death of a programme 
would bea boon. Bearing in mind Com- 
modore's shortcomings when it comes 
to documentation, a paragraph or 
two on the system editor and CLI and a 
few moreexample programmes wouldn't 
have gone amiss. Overall a nice package 
which could appeal to both the expe- 
rienced FORTRAN user and to the 
Amiga user who would like to enjoy the 
advantages of a compiler language. 
Once mastered it becomes a very pow- 
erful tool. I like it! 
Ian Bennett 



38 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA I 



K-SEKA 
ASSEMBLER 



This assembler is not the first to appear 
for the AMIGA although it is the first to 
be made available for public sale. The 
only other assembler I am aware of at 
this time is the Metacomco 68000 
Assembler which was originally part of 
the software development kit provided 
to registered AMIGA software develop- 
ers in the UK. The Metacomco assembler 
is a competent product and although it 
is now on public sale in the USA, it is not 
a series of routines or libraries for specific 
mand sequences necessary to invoke 
any work from it see to that. In addition 
there no monitor is present — the 68000 
monitor is provided by another software 
developers product called WACK (short 
for Westchester Amiga Crash Killer?). 
Thus the prospective purchaser is faced 
with buying two separate pieces of 
software. 

Working in assembly language on the 
AMIGA is not too difficult but is only 
recommended where absolute speed is 
essential for the application. With a 
clock speed in excess of seven times 
that of previous Commodore machines, 
even high-level languages such as BASIC 
are not particularly slow. The operating 
system of the AMIGA was written in C 
and this is the recommended approach 
by Commodore for low-level program- 
ming since there are direct hooks into 
the system software using C. These 
books are omnipresent and using 
assembly language means that labels 
rather than direct addresses are used. 
For example, the multi-tasking control 
of the system is carried out by an entity 
known as EXEC. This is responsible for 
many things such as memory allocation, 
placement of your program code, task 
scheduling and input/output. EXEC is 
the core of the AMIGA. 

The operating system is made up of 
series of routines or libraries for specific 
tasks. For example, the disk operating 
system is controlled by the DOS library, 
EXEC is controlled by the EXEC library. 
In order to get the AMIGA to do any- 
thing the you must first 'open'the EXEC 
library, which in turn provides the 'open' 
mechanism or routine to open the other 
libraries. An abbreviated AMIGA 68000 
assembly language fragment would look 
like this:- 



move.1 a6,— (sp) ;save current 

contents of 
register a6 

move.1 ExecBase, a6 ;move the 

address of the 
EXEC library 
into register 
a6 

lea intuition. library, a1 ;load the 
effective 
address of the 
required 
library name 
in this case 
Intuition 
library into 
register a1 

jsr OpenLib (a6) ;call the 

OpenLib 
routine from 
EXEC 
which now 
checks to see 
that the 
;library name 
is in register 
a1 

move.1 dO.lntuitionBase ;place the 

address of the 
library base 
in register dO 

move.1 (sp) +, a6 ;restore 

register a6 to 
original value 

Note how labels are used extensively 
therefore the correct spelling is essen- 
tial. Your source code file would look 
virtually identical to this apart from the 
setting up of the library version number 
and the inclusion of any macros. 
Addresses are always dealt with indi- 
rectly, unless of course you wish to 
abandon the benefits of multi-tasking. 

Since the object code relies on rela- 
tive addresses, the code must be 'linked' 
with the existing system software librar- 
ies. The process of 'linking'ensures that 
at the time of loading the application 
program code the addesses are correct. 
For example, when the object code was 
initially created it would be located at a 
certain address, let's assume $00A000. 
However, on the next occasion it is 
loaded into memory, this address may 
be occupied by object code from another 



application — remember the AMIGA is a 
multi-tasking machine. To overcome 
this, particularly when branches within 
the code may absolute to an address, 
'linking' solves this problem. Thus an 
important feature of assembly language 
work on the AMIGA involves carrying 
out the 'linking' process, although the 
above example is only part of the func- 
tion of 'linking'. 

Unprotected 

Having briefly looked at the technique 
of programming, what does the pur- 
chaser get for his or her money? The 
product is supplied on an unprotected 
disk along with a 35 page manual. The 
manual make no pretence to learning 
the semantics of 68000 code generation 
and is entirely concerned with the oper- 
ation of the various components. There 
is a text editor which seemed initially 
superfluous since AmigaDOS provides 
the excellent ED or EDIT for this pur- 
pose. However, this editor provides a 
cut-and-paste facility and improved 
control over the screen output. The 
commands available consist of the 
following:- 

I (n) Insert text 

T (n) Target to line (n) 

U (n) Up (n) lines 

P (n) Print (n) lines 

L (text) Locate text 
L Locate next occurrance 

H Query buffer size 

E Edit line 

B Bottom of buffer 

D (n) Down (n) lines 

Z (n) Delete (n) lines 

KS Kill source code 

O Revive source code 

Most of these are fairly conventional 
although some are extremely useful. For 
example, the T (target) line command 
which provides a means of getting 
around your source code file very 
quickly. Similarly, the 'H' (how big?) 
command which displays the buffer sizes 
for workspace, linker input, source, relo- 
cation stream, object output code and 
object output data are future indica- 
tions of a package designed for hard- 
pressed programmers. A definite poin- 
ter in this direction was the inclusion of 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 39 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



the 'O'(old) function which undoes the 
last 7CS'(kill source code buffer) com- 
mand — a real life-saver. 

The assembler itself provides only 
one command which is naturally enough 
'A' for assemble! Several options are 
available to cover output to the screen 
or printer. The remaining two options 
are designed for program enhance- 
ments and include an optimise branches 
facility and toggle the linkable code 
generation on or off. This last feature is 
of particular significance where the 
code contains a large number of errors, 
usually at the initial stages. By switching 
out the linking facility the code can be 
assembled with errors being trapped on 
a 'sfop-on-error'approach, which allows 
a faster cycle of edit/assemble/re-edit to 
take place until the errors are finally 
eliminated. A full range of pseudo oper- 
ators are available based on Motorola 
68000 assembler conventions with some 
additions for specifically invoking 
exceptions. The assembler is said to be 
able to operate at a speed of circa 25,000 
lines/minute on absolute or linked code. 
I did not have any source code to hand 
which approached this quantity although 
on assembling smaller files I could see 
no reason to dispute the supplier's 
claim. 

The symbolic debugger or monitor 
provided symbol table access, arith- 
metic operation and user input in any 
number base in addition to the conven- 



tional monitor facilities. I found this 
monitor easier to learn than WACK, the 
'official monitor' principally because the 
commands used the letters of the 
alphabet more explicitly to signify a 
function — WACK tends to use choices 
such as ';'or '[' for functions. 

Enhancements 

However, I felt that some enhancements 
could be added to the monitor. On the 
next release of the product. I would like 
to see use made of the HELP key — this 
could provide a screen listing all the 
command keys and their functions. It 
would have been pleasant to have on 
display continuously all the 68000 regis- 
ters, for example in a small window in 
the upper corner of the screen. It can be 
both difficult and tedious to keep track 
of just what value is where during your 
dealings with a 18 register processor! 
One final requirement which is peculiar 
to the AMIGA concerns the special cir- 
cuit registers i.e. AGNUS, DENISE etc. 
Some of these cannot be accessed 
directly without the system becoming 
very upset and falling over. A method to 
avoid this is to reduce the display frame 
size of the monitor, a technique which 
I haveemployed successfully with WACK 
— the present release of K-SEKA does 
not support this. 

I mentioned earlier the ability to leave 
out linking, a useful timesaver. K-SEKA 



also allows linking of code modules and 
assembling a source file simultaneously 
— another excellent timesaver. All in all 
K-SEKA is both a useful and above all 
useable product. Not only does it com- 
bine flexibility with speed, it is easy to 
use. Programming the AMIGA at 
assembly language level is very defi- 
nitely not a task for the faint-hearted or 
impatient prog rammer — it is far removed 
from the balmy days of the 6502 proces- 
sors of yesteryear. Whilst hardware 
costs may be falling like the proverbial 
lead plated balloon, software develop- 
ment costs continue to rocket upwards. 
Indeed, the indications are that this 
trend is likely to continue for some time 
to come. Anything a programmer can 
do to reduce both the learning curve 
time and compilation/assembly time 
and thus free him/her to get on with the 
creative aspects of the software devel- 
opment cycle means greater productiv- 
ity and therefore an enhancement of the 
profitability (financial or otherwise) of 
the whole exercise. K-SEKA is an essen- 
tial tool to achieving this goal. 

KUMA Computers Ltd. 

Unit 12. 

Horseshoe Road. 

Pangbourne. 

Berks. 

RG8 7JW 

Tel. 073574335 

£69.52 




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40 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



2 MEGs For Your 

AMIGA 



A must for software developers 

Allows more programs to run simultaneously and faster 

Can be used to increase system RAM and/or as a FAST RAM DRIVE 

Uses standard memory bus architecture to allow for future compatibility 

Allows full use of memory expansion port for additional peripherals 

Already in use by most major software developers worldwide 

AX2000 2 MEG RAM Board $899.00 U.S. ($1276.00 CDN) 
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada 
M6A2Y6 (416)787-0617 



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Coming Soon! — our new Amiga Card Cage 

AMIGA is a registered trademark of Commodore Business Machine. 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIC 



CAD in the computer version stands for 
Computer- Aided Design and a machine 
such as the AMIGA forms the ideal plat- 
form to give life to this concept. 

The Aegis DRAW package is supplied 
on a single disk together with a very 
extensive manual. The manual not only 
provides details of the software but also 
provides an introduction to the con- 
cepts of CAD. Whilst the text of the 
manual gave extensive coverage to the 
package it seemed rather limited in 
terms of the screen diagrams. I think the 
author lost sight of the fact that some of 
the techniques employed in CAD would 
be better served by a drawing rather 
than text. This is, after all a drawing 
package! A minor criticism since one of 
the strengths of Aegis DRAW lies in its 
teaching posibilities and many users 
could well be without direct supervision 
from a knowledgeable CAD user. 

CAD allows the creation of accurately 
scaled drawings — in effect a database 
of the various elements of the drawing 
such as shape, dimension and relation- 
ship to other elements, etc. The screen 
display of the AMIGA serves as a win- 
cfowinto the drawing although the draw- 
ing can have a far higher resolution or 
depth of focus than that being shown on 
the monitor. This means that the user 
can zoom in on a section of the drawing 
and make this the new screen display. 
There are no limits (honestly!) on the 
zoom facility — you can, if you wish 
zoom into infinity and could stop with 
the tiniest screen pixel of display dot 
enlarged into a full-sized screen. This 
may be rather difficult to swallow but if 
you watch this being done you will 
understand the concept. 

I am very pleased to report that this 
package makes full use of both hard 
disks and any additional RAM the user 
may have added to their system. On a 
standard European specification AMIGA 
of 51 2K, Aegis DRAW allows two win- 
dows simultaneously — remember we 
are talking of 600 by 200 resolution with 
1 6 colours. My own AMIGA has a total of 
2.5 megabytes of RAM and was able to 
provide a further 3 windows making 5 in 
total. If you feel that this would be insuf- 
ficient then invoking the multi-tasking 
facility of the AMIGA to initiate another 
Aegis DRAW running provided a further 
3 windows before I ran out of memory. I 
don't think anyone is going to raise their 
eyebrows in complaint at 8 screens run- 
ning on 16 bit-planes each. For those 
users who really want to make the mini- 
computer crew with their DEC's and 
VAX's howl and squirm then switch the 
display into interlace mode and take the 
resolution up to 600 by 400 pixels per 
screen. I would defy anyone to produce 
this on an IBM-AT using any hardware 
add-on and software of their choice for a 
total cost of less than $8,000. 

Aegis DRAW relies on using INTUTION 



35 . » 



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his Plot was made with Regis Draw 
log a 512K Amiga and a Epson HI-80 Plotter.! 



Hm4 tin* PVM> 



OurU Mm Lm« ^"K 







42 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



FBGtNFF— EbrEVf^F^eNl 



i USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI / 




Draw 



n*m« mal 




**« Mm. tit 



| M«tar*>reetln« 



iR-EErR-R 



EVRfPrl-eM 



REGIS 

Development 
2210 Wilshire Blvd. 
Santa Monica, Cfl 90403 



as the working environment which gives 
the user windows, menus and requestors. 
A requestor is effectively a forced-choice 
menu — the user has to respond to it. 
The software is tool based and uses 
conventional terms for a function. This 
makes using the package extremely 
easy. 

Ther are 7 main headings in the menu 
bar — project, edit, tools, display, 
options, preferences and colours. The 
options under project allow creation 
and file operations, edit allows changes 
to be made to an existing drawing. This 
option also contains the very useful 
undo command which will reverse the 
last editing operation. In the tools menu 
are found the various shapes and option 
to create a shape on the drawing whilst 
display controls the screen output. The 
Aegis DRAW uses a continuous grid 
and ruler on the display, both of which 
can be re-scaled or removed.altogether 
— selecting the latter improves the 
already fat re-draw sequence consider- 
ably, a classic demonstration of the 
power of the dedicated graphics hard- 
ware of the AMIGA. The options menu 
gives access to the different aspects of 
the drawing such as line thickness and 
pattern, grid size and plotter scale. Pref- 
erences is similar in operation to options 
in that any selection made here is on a 
toggle (on/off) basis. The final menu 
option is colour and Aegis Draw allows 
selection from 16 colours — these can 
be altered by means of adjustment of the 
RGB components. These 16 colours are 
derived from a master palette of 4,096. 

The output from Aegis DRAW can be 
directed to either dot-matrix printer or 
plotter and some examples of the latter 
mode are shown here. The plotter range 
supported is very extensive. A printer 
will only provide a print of the screen 
display and will not have the resolution 
if the user has been making use of the 
zoom facility. Thus, to obtain the full 
benefit of this package a plotter is 
essential. The file format is the standar- 
dised IFF which allows a large degree of 
portability between different applica- 
tions on the AMIGA. 

It is without exaggeration to say that 
Aegis DRAW is a seminal piece of 
AMIGA software. The most obvious 
markets for this product lie in architec- 
tural design, building construction acti- 
vity, electronic component design, quite 
frankly the list is endless. In effect Aegis 
DRAW has made professional CAD 
available to everyone — yet another 
mainframe/minicomputer monopoly 
bites the dust. A demonstratioin is 
strongly recommended. Most viewers 
will walk away pleasantly astonished 
especially at the cost. 

Price: £147.78 (plus VAT). 

UK Distributor: Precision Software 
Ltd., Park Terrace, Worcester Park, Sur- 
rey KT4 7JZ. Tel: 01-330 7166. 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 43 






Aegis i mages - Professional * 
Paint System - 

* Aegis Animator - Artist's * 

Animation System * 



Clip-Out Images J 

* Aegis Draw - Computer Aided * 

Design * 

* Aegis Impact -Executive * 

Graphics 

* Logistix - Spreadsheet, *r 
Database and Time 
Management * 

* Mi Amiga File - Filing System 

* Gizmoz - Office Desk Utilities * 



* Digital Link -Communications, 
VT100 Emulation 

* Lattice C Complier 

* Cambridge Lisp 



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3-7 SEPTEMBER 1986 
OLYMPIA LONDON 



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K-Seka Assembler 

Amiga Toolkit 

Canon 1080A Colour Inkjet 

Printer 

Microforge 20/40MB Hard 

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Comspec 2MB RAM 

Expansion 

Stereo Sound Digitizer 



* ...and many more 



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Precision Software is an established 
leader in the serious Commodore Market 
for the whole range from C64 up to the 
Amiga. 

Precisions Superscript and 
Superbase lead the way to new standards 
and today continue to be regarded as 
unrivalled quality business packages. 

Precision Software has now 
progressed to become the outstanding 
supplier of software and peripherals for 
the AMIGA. It is also a major sales point 
for the purchase of AMIGA and C128D 
computers. 

For software, hardware and support 
for Commodore and the AMIGA come to 
— Precision Software. 



Precision Software 




Precision Software Limited 

6 Park Terrace, Worcester Park 

Surrey KT4 7JZ 

Telex: 8955021 PRECIS G 



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...the Amiga place 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA I 

CANON PJ 1080 A 
INKJET PRINTER 



Most readers will be familiar with, or 
indeed probably own and operate a dot- 
matrix or daisywheel printer. An inkjet 
printer is more likely to be unknown to 
them in terms of their technology or 
price. Happily, the Canon PJ-1080A will 
provide some welcome relief on the lat- 
ter factor since it is now very compe- 
tively priced. However, can an already 
overcrowded market absorb this inter- 
loper? My answer is YES because inkjet 
printers open another dimension to 
users who demand quality without run- 
ning to the current £2000 + levels of laser 
printers. I have been running the PJ- 
1080A for some 3 months courtesy of 
Precision Software on a variety of 
machines and have learned just what it 
can and can't do. Here's my report. 

In printing terms there are two basic 
theologies — impact and non-impact. 
The daisywheel and dot-matrix printers 
rely on mechanical impact to transfer 
the nk from it's medium, usually a rib- 
bon to the paper. Such a system 
demands a high level of mechanical 
parts with the consequent wear and tear 
that this entails which is ultimately 
reflected in the loss of the original 
manufacturing tolerances after several 
thousand hours of use. To circumvent 
this deterioration a system of mainte- 
nance is necessary which brings further 
problems, not least in additional and 
often unplanned financial costs. A non- 
impact printer such as an inkjet or laser 
does not have the equivalent level of 
mechanical parts (no ribbon to be 
moved) and they achieve their objective 
by transfering the ink by contact with 
ratherthan hammering on the surface of 
the paper. This ink placement process 
can take the form of being squirted onto 
the paper (inkjet) or transfer from a pre- 
coated roller (laser). The outcome of an 
impact on the surface of the paper 
means a disturbance among the fibres 
which constitute the paper. This can 
cause a distortion pattern which can 
lead to the ink bleeding or leaking 
beyond the initial site of impact with a 
subsequent drop in the resolution of the 
character. 

There are a number of solutions to 
this which can involve higher viscosity 
inks, increasing the number of pins in 
the dot-matrix to spread the mechanical 
loading on the paper surface making the 
paper more resistant to the impact 



although this can lead to higher wear 
rates on the impacting unit itself. The 
current line of thinking among the dot- 
matrix printer manufacturers seems to 
favour the increased number of pins 
route. The daisywlual printer can pro- 
duce good resolution characters al- 
though this is at the expense of opera- 
tional speed and very high dependence 
on a mechanical infrastructure with all 
this entails in terms of maintenance and 
noise emissions. 

The CANON PJ-180A produces up to 
seven basic colours using either paper 
or overhead-transparency plastic sheet. 
The Achilles heel of inkjet printers — the 
drying out of ink in the jet nozzles when 
the printer is not in use is overcome by a 
novel technology which allows ink to 
syphon back to a reservoir. As a secon- 
dary precaution the jets are also 
mechanically capped which also has the 
benefit of preventing foreign bodies i.e. 
dust particles, settling on the jets. The 
seven colours available from the printer 
are yellow, magenta, cyan, black, red 
green and blue — there are actually 8 
colours if you include the the paper 
colour which is usually white. The noz- 
zles for each colour consist of a 0.1 mm 
glas tube with a piezo-electric trans- 
ducer attached. Applying a voltage to 
the transducer causes a minute com- 
pression on the glass which in turn for- 
ces the ink through the nozzle orafice 
under sufficient pressure to hit the 
paper. Incidentally, the laser printer 
uses a form of this — the jet of ink is 
issued under electronstatic force rather 
than hydrostatic and since the ink 
stream is electrically charged it is 
attracted to the paper which carries an 
opposite electrical charge. Contrary to 
popular belief, laser printers do not burn 
the paper to form the image. The need 
for an effective capping mechanism is 
apparant when the size of each nozzle is 
only 0.065mm — which is about 15% of 
the size of the fullstop at the end of this 
line. 

The printer as supplied uses the Cen- 
tronics type interface and appears to be 
completely EPSON compatible — I say 
this since I used my existing EPSON 
printer cable without any problems. 
Paper handling is done through friction- 
feed, with the emphasis on using a roll of 
paper as the machine has a recessed 
holderforthis type of paper. I must con- 



fess to avoiding paper rolls and found 
that standard (80 column) paper would 
fit provided the perforated tractor-feed 
edges were removed. By doing this, 
paper of any length would work satisfac- 
torily and narrow paper i.e. labels and 
envelopes presented even less of a prob- 
lem. During the course of this 3 month 
period the printer produced many copies 
of graphic output from my AMIGA 
which placed a severe demand on the 
quantity of ink required. CANON declare 
in the excellent User Manual that ac- 
companied the printer that each colour 
is good for 3.5 million characters and 
based on my own experience I would 
feel this to be an understatement. 

There are two basic modes of opera- 
tion 2 text and graphics. Text mode pro- 
vides a total of 96 characters at a 
claimed speed of 37 characters/second 
with access to 8 ASCII international 
character sets. These are USA, UK, 
FRANCE, GERMANY, DENMARK, 
SWEDEN, ITALY and JAPAN. These are 
ail identical to the EPSON character set. 
The matrix size is 5 by 7 in standard 
characters and 1 by 7 in enlarged char- 
acters. The characters can be under- 
lined, emboldened and printed in a type 
of reverse video, that is the paper being 
printed in a different colour from the 
characters themselves. There was no 
support for italics and the printed char- 
acters lacked true-descenders thus rul- 
ing the CANON out for serious work as a 
word processing printer although the 
true strength of the machine lay in its 
graphics abilities. 

With a resolution of 640 by 560 dots, 
the CANON PJ-1080A is perfectly 
matched for use with the AMIGA. The 
line scan is bi-directional and printout 
taking about 2 minutes on average 
although this is obviously dependent on 
the degree of complexity of the screen 
image. There is a small internal buffer 
which provides a slight advantage in 
overall operational speed although the 
multi-tasking facility of the AMIGA 
made this unnecessary. The output 
obtained from thi; lardware combina- 
tion was spectaci ir to say the least. 
Naturally there are limitations — where 
one device can provide 4.096 colour and 
the other 7 colours, there has to be con- 
straints. However, it should be realised 
that to accurately reproduce the screen 
display of the AMIGA by a terminal prin- 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 45 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



ter would shift the cost element by a 
massive amount — certainly well past 
the cost of the AMIGA itself. 

One problem that could concern 
potential buyers relates to the ink itself. 
This is handled in cartridge form, a 
leakproof plastic bag to be precise 
which is inserted into a special tray in 
the printer. Hypodermic needles then 
penetrate the cartridge and the printer 
obtains its supply (or fix!) of ink with 
complete protection for the user from 
getting ink everywhere. A very simple 
but effective idea. This was also one 
area that I fixed upon rapidly, since run- 
ning costs tend to be ignored or forgot- 
ten by many users, and discovered that 
the cost of the ink cartridge is less than 
£20.00, although no doubt this could be 
improved by shopping around. Obvi- 
ously it would be difficult to forecast 
with complete accuracy the annual run- 
ning costs in terms of consumable items 
since this depends on usage. I menti- 
oned earlier that I had heavily used this 
printer for 3 months on both my AMIGA 
and C128D and I could not detect any 
decrease in performance by the end of 
this period. 

So what is the market for the CANON 
PJ-1080A? The obvious one is business 
graphics since the combination of 
AMIGA/CANON/LOGISTIX is unbeat- 










WmmMzmt 



^WW mooc 9M040 - 




able in this application. Other uses 
could be cartography, graphic design 
and art — the range is potentially 
extremely wide. EPSON compatability 
is important not just from the character 
viewpoint since most graphic software 
drivers also use EPSON control codes. 
The only other competition for the 
CANON comes from EPSON them- 
selves (who else!) with their JX-80 prin- 
ter and the OKIMATE Colour Printer. 
These will be tested in forthcoming 
issues of Commodore Business and 



AMIGA User. 

For graphics and other uses, particu- 
larly at its present price the CANON PJ- 
1080A unquestionably provides excel- 
lent value. 

Price: £345.00 (including VA T) 
Supplier: Precision Software Ltd. 
6 Park Terrace 
WORCHESTER PARK 
Surrey KT4 7JZ 
Tel. 01 330 7166 



The Amiga System: 
An Introduction — 

Bill Donald 
Precision Books 
£9.95. 



Bill Donald is acknowledged as one of 
the outstanding experts on the Amiga. A 
frequent contributor to this magazine 
and possessor of one of the first Am igas 
in private ownership outside the USA, 
he has followed all the developments 
connected with the Amiga with close 
attention. It was therefore no surprise 
when he was commissioined by Preci- 
sion Software — the most important dis- 
tributor of Amiga Software — to create a 
totally authoritative book on the Com- 
modore computer. 

THE MACHINE 

Starting with the hardware, the author 
describes the Amiga's 68000 based CPU 
and the other special chips that handle 
graphics and animation, relating the 
sophisticated visual capabilities of the 
machine to its underlying architecture. 
The Amiga System: An Introduction 
also provides detailed guidance on con- 
trolling the Amiga mouse, light pen, and 



disk drives, as well as the serial and 
parallel I/O interfaces. The hardware 
discussion culminates in a fascinating 
account of the Amiga's audio facilities. 

INTUITION 

Intuition is the name of the Amiga's 
attractive mouse driven multi-window- 
ing interface. Bill Donald shows how the 
elements of Intuition fit together to form 
a friendly and easily manipulated oper- 
ating environment, and discusses the 
routines for programming Intuition 
effectively. 

AmigaDOS 

The Amiga's Operating System, 
AmigaDOS, is probably the first genuine 
multi-processing operating system on a 
microcomputer, allowing users to run 
several programs, or "processes" at 
once. The Amiga System: An Introduc- 
tion covers the Command Line Interpre- 
ter (CLI), the filing system, special devi- 
ces, and the command editor, with 
many examples of essential everyday 
housekeeping operations. 

Bill Donald's book, The Amiga Sys- 
tem: An Introduction, is full of useful 
information. It will provide anyone who 
already owns an Amiga, or prove to 
anyone considering its purchase, just 
what may be achieved. 



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Precision 
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AMIGA 

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An Introduction 



Hardware 

I System Software 
■ Intuition Interface 




46 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 



JRGENTLY REQUEST ... NAME OF AMIGA SOFTWARE DISTRIBUTOR IN MY COUNTRY 



AUSTRALIA J 
COMMODORE BUSINESS 


CANADA 
BEAMSCOPE 


FINLAND 


GREECE 


OY-PCI DATA AB 


MEMOX S . A . 


MACHINES 


128 SHORTING RUAD 


P(J BOX 148 


SEVASTOUPOLEOS 150 


67 MARS RUAD 


SCARBOROUGH 


SILMUKKATIE 2 


115 26 ATHENS 


LAME COVE 


ONTARIO MIS 3S6 


65101 VASSA 




N. S. W. 2066 






TEL: 301-6932945 




TEL: 416-291-0000 


TEL: 358-61-113611 




TEL! 612-1+271+888 










CGMSPEC COMMUNICATIONS 


WSOY 


ICELAND 


AUSTRIA 


153 BRIDGELANQ AVENOE 


MIKRO-OSASTO 






UNIT IS 


OGUKO RIIKONEN 


THOR LIMITED 


DISIMAT 


TORONTO 


PO BOX 222 


ARMOLA 11 


AR8EITER6 46 


ONTARIO M6A 2Y6 


00121 HELSINKI 


PO BOX 8340 


1050 VIENNA 






128 REYKJAVIK 




TEL:416"7B/-0617 


AMERSOFT OY 




TEL: 0222/542892 




GUNNAR NYSTREN 


TEL: 354-1681500 




em:j data systems ltd 


PO BOX 159 
00101 HELSINKI 


ISRAEL 


PRINT IECHNIK 


291 UOODLAWN ROAD WEST 






stumpers 34 


UNIT 3, GUELPH 




TADIRAN MARKETING 


1060 VIENNA 


ONTARIO N1H /L6 


BUBINESMAN OY 


& services' LTD 






KALE VI MAENPAA 


3 HASHALOM ROAD 


TEL: ®222/S73t+23 


TEL: 519-837-2444 


KILONTIE 3 


PQ BOX 36262 






02610 ESPU 


TEL AVIV 61362 


URXEGSAOER 




MIKROLINK OY 


TEL: 972-32-67272 


HAUPTPLATZ 2 


FRANTEK 


PETER BUR MAN 




8230 HARTBERG 


1645 RUSSELL ROAD, UNIT 2 


TaOLONTOLLINKATO 5 


BOG MICROCOMPUTER 




OTTAWA 


00250 HELSINKI 


BOOKS AND SOFTWARE 


TEL: 0S332/2212 


ONTARIO K1G 4G5 




DIZINGOF CENTRE 
GATE 5 


LGRENTSCHITSCH 


TEL: 613-523-7272 


FRANCE 


64332 TEL AVIV 








SPERLINGWEG 23 




COMMODORE FRANCE S.A.R.L. 


TEL: 972-3-290142 


5023 SALZBUR6 




150-152 AV DE VERDUN 
92130-ISSY LED MOULINEAUX 




TEL: 0662/52235 


INGRAM 








50 A ADESSU DRIVE 


TEL: 331-46445555 




UEBERREUTHER MEDIA 


CONCORDE 




ITALY 


ONTARIO L4K 2YL 






ALSER STR 24 




ERISTEL 

9-15 AV PAOL DOUMER 

92500 RUEIL-MALMAISON 


DIEGO PERINI 


1091 WIEN 

TEL: 0222/4815380 


TEL: 416-738-1700 


QUEST 

VIA AMEDO 
CARISIO 42 






TEL: 331-47492748 


37136 VERONA 




PHASE 4 DEVELOPMENT 








7157 FISHER ROAD, S.. E. 






BELGIUM 


CALGARY 
ALBERTA T2H 0W4 


CAPRICORNE 

19 RUE DU VAL MARNE 


LEBANON 


BUSINESS MACHINES 






94250 GENTILLY 


CANBERRA 


TEL: 403-252-0911 




CORPORATION 


INDUSTRIEZONE III 




TEL: 331-47401270 


PO BOX 113-5105 


UATERMULENS TR AA X 






MOMAYYAR BLDG 


9440 AALST-ERENBUDEGEM 






HAMRA STREET 




DENMARK 


GERMANY 


BEIRUT 

TEL: 961-345959 


MAGNA DATA A/S 


MARKT+TECHNIK 


FIRSTSUFTWARE BENELUX 


RYESGADE 3 


HAMS-PINSEL STRASSE 2 




RESEARCH PARK 


2200 KOBENHAVN N 


D-8013 




3030 LEUVEN 






MAURITIUS 




TEL: 01-392039 


TEL: 49-89-4613385 








HOME 8. BUSINESS 


EASY COMPUTING 






COMPUTER CO LTD 


G. LEFEVER AVENUE 30 


R.B. DATA 


ARI0LA30FT 




1160 BRUSSELS 


POSTBOX 28 


CARL-BERTELSMANN- 


NO 5 CHAOSSE STREET' 




2980 KOKKEDAL 


STRASSE 161 


PORT-LOUIS 






0-4830 GOETERSLOH 


TEL: 230-22910 


DA l"A+ 


SUPERSUFT APS 






4 GENEVES! RAAT/B 18 


ABOULEVARDEN 51-53 


TEL: 49-5241-805393 




1140 BRUSSELS 


8000 ARHUS C 








TEL: 06-193244 


DATA BECKER 
MER0W1NGERSTRASSE 30 






OUICKSOFT 


D-4000 DOSSELDORF 






BAKKES ALLE 9-11 








1807 FREDERIKSBERG 


TEL: 49-211-345091 





Commodore Business and AMIGA User 47 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA 

— ' r~ 

URGENTLY REQUEST ... NAME OF AMIGA SOFTWARE DISTRIBUTOR IN MY COUNTRY 



MEI HERLANDS 

BERENDSEN COMPUTER 

PRODUCTS BV 
ENERSIESTRAAT 20 
1411TT NAARDEN 

I'EL: 02159-49594 



MINIHGUSE TSI BV 
J. MEEK 

OSDORPPLEIM 228 
1068 ER AMSTERDAM 

TEL: 620-104-91+9 



NORWAY 

COMMODORE COMPUTER 
NORSE A/B 

BROBEKKVEIEN 38 
0509 OSLO 5 

TEL: 427-648190 



A/B KREA'I IV TEKNIKK 
PQSTBOKS 378 

1301 BANUVIKA 

TEL: 02-54- 32 81 



PORTUGAL 

COMERC1AL LA80RUM 
R. REBTDRACAO 83-2 
4000 PUR TO 

TEL: 251-2-695767 



SAUDI ARABIA 

ABDULLA FOUAD & SONS 

PO BOX 257 
DAMMAM 31411 

TEL: 96-63-8324400 



SPAIN 

OR U -SOFT 
FUND ADORES 3 
28028 MADRID 

TEL: 91-255-45 00 



GRAFOX ESPA: OLA S. A. 
MONTESA 35 
28006 MADRID 

TEL: 91-401-06-12 



PROEIN S.A. 
VELAZSUEZ 10 
28001 MADRID 

TEL: 91-276-22 08 



TECNISGFT S.A. 
IMAGEN 8 
41003 SEV1LLA 

TEL: 954-22 65 42 



CYBERSYSTEMS S.A. 
CHILE 3 
MAJADAHGNDA-MADR1D 

TEL: 91-638 73 06 



SUFI' CAMBRICS 

PI. CREU DE LA MISiO, LOCAL 1 

CAMBRILS (TARRAGONA) 

TEL: 977-35 44 55 



MICRONET S.A. 

VICTOR DE LA SERNA 36 

28016 MADRID 

TEL: 91-45 7 50 56 



PRISMA SUFI S.A. 
CONDES DE TORREAMAZ 5 
28028 MADRID 



TEL: 91-409 II 



il 



COMPULOGICAL 

ST CRUZ DE MARCENADO 31 

28015 MADRID 

TEL: 91-241 10 63 



MUZ ART 

JAIME I 145 

MULLET DEL VALLES (BARCELONA) 



fEL: 93-593 75 01 



SOOTH AFRICA 

TEDELEX 

PO BOX 10525 

29 HERONMERE ROAD 

REOVEN 

JOHANNESBURG 2000 

TEL: 27-11-6838911 
SWEDEN 

CUE COMPUTER PRODUCTS AB 
FAG ERST AG AT AN 7 
S-16353 SPAN6A 

TEL: 46-87602550 



SWITZERLAND 

6EURO AG (MEGA SHOP ) 
FALKENPLATZ 7 
3012 BERN 

TEL: 031/2440 05 



SOFTWARELANU AG 
FRANKLINSTR 27 
8050 ZURICH 

TEL: 01/3115959 



IRCO ELECTRONIC 

3 RUE JEAN VIULETTE 

1250 GENEVE 

TEL: 022/203306 



EUROBOFT SA 
CHEMIN DU MIDI 4-6 
1260 NYON 

TEL: 022/622020 

UK 

SILICA DISTRIBUTION LTD 

1-4 THE MEWS 

HATHERLEY ROAD 

SIDCUP 

KENT DA14 4DX 

TEL: 01-309-0300 
PRECISION SOFTWARE 
6 PARK TERRACE 
WORCESTER PARK 
SURREY KT4 7JZ 

TEL: 01-330-7166 



VISION TECHNOLOGY 
53-59 HIGH STREET 
CROYDON 
SURREY 

TEL: 01-686-6362 



HABA SYSTEMS LTD 

PIER ROAD 

NORTH FELTHAM TRADING ESTATE 

FELTHAM 

MIDDLESEX 

TW14 0TT 

TEL: 01-751 6451 

YUGOSLAVIA 



KON1M 

FOREIGN INDUSTRIAL AGENCIES P.O 

61001 LJUBLJANA 

TITOVA 38/VIII 

TEL: 3B-61-322644 

CANKARJEVA ZALOZBA 
KOPITARJEVA 2 
I 61000 LJUBLJANA 



48 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



CI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA U 



Amiga 



The rapid growth in the UK and USA of 
inter-computer communication in the 
form of public and private data trans- 
mission systems has been matched by 
an ever-growing range of communica- 
tion peripherals and software. In this 
article I will be looking at the software 
available for the AMIGA in the data 
transmission field. I have three straight- 
forward communication packages. 
These are TELECRAFT, ONLINE! and 
AMIGATERM — the remaining product 
being BBS-PC, a bulletin board system. 

First the comms software — these fol- 
low a similar route in terms of the front- 
end or screen display. Each uses the 
WORKBENCH environment of windows 
and menus to display the very large 
number of functions available to the 
user. Indeed, a criticim could be leveled 
at each of these products for having 
rather too many facilities causing con- 
fusion to the novice. There is a funda- 
mental problem here between what the 
user wants and what the software can 
give. Comms software appears to cater 
for two basic types of user — one will 
simply want to carry out specific and 
unchanging tasks. In the UK these tasks 
could well be sending telexes via TELE- 
COM GOLD, reading the CITISERVICE 
pages on PRESTEL or possibily logging 
on to one of the large public databases 
located in the USA. The other type of 
user is a true techno-gourmet. For him 
(or her) sampling the intricacies of baud 
rates, tasting the effects of even parities 
or even slipping into the delights of 
duplex are like food and drink. With this 
level of patience, knowledge and deter- 
mination it is no doubt possible to have 
your AMIGA talking to the distributor 
cap on a Ford Granada located on the 
third floor of a multi-storey car park in 
Wellington, New Zealand. 

Comms software can be either for a 
specific purpose or for the user to 
choose the requirement. The three pie- 
ces under review here belong to the lat- 
ter category. This is fine IF you know 
what to do. In a situation where the user 
does not care to become involved in the 
setting-up of files and communication 
protocols then these packages are suf- 
ficiently powerful and flexible enough to 
enable the retailer to achieve this quickly 
and efficiently for the purchaser. Once 
this has been done, then a simple 'crib 
card' containing the operating instruc- 
tions would suffice. 



Comms 




For example, let us assume that the 
settings file has already been created for 
you. This file contains all of the com- 
munication information such as trans- 
mit and receive rates, protocols, screen 
colours, telephone number and pass- 
word relevant to your application. This 
is loaded into the AMIGA from the menu 
selection 'LOAD SETTINGS'. Having 
done this the machine then prompts for 
a file name — obviously it pays to name 
these files in such a way that they bear a 
meaningful relationship to the individ- 
ual database you wish to contact. The 
software automatically assigns a 'set- 
tings' suffix to these files after define- 
ment so you are kept within the settings 
directory, avoiding possible errors on 
selecting the wrong type of file. Once 
the settings file is in the machine, the 
next step is to open a buffer. At this point 
the uninitiated may start thinking in terms 
of wrestling with a component of railway 
rolling stock. No, the buffer is simply a 
designated area of memory to receive or 
transmit the data from. Imagine your 
AMIGA as a telegraphist (as seen in Wild 
West movies), the buffer is simply the 
telegraphist's notepad upon which the 
message is placed. 

The next stage is to dial the telephone 
number of the database you require and 



listen for a continuous whistling tone 
indicating that the computer at the 
remote end is ready. The final stage in 
this process is to switch the modem to 
ONLINE, unless of course you have one 
of those mega-modems that does all of 
this for you. Data is then received or 
transmitted from the buffer. It probably 
reads a lot more complicated than it 
actually is. Once the foundations, the 
settings, have been laid, then even 
unskilled operators may use the AMIGA 
supported by sophisticated autodial 
modems as a effective communciations 
terminal. 

Packages 

Each of the three comms packages 
we used provide an extremely compre- 
hensive range of functions for data 
transfer across telephone lines using a 
direct connect modem. The more ad- 
vanced features include telephone 
number directories and function key 
definement to character string com- 
mands. This latter function is another 
step in the direction of saving the user 
time — for example key F1 could be 
assigned thefollowing command string:- 

9221 1 1 4444444444 4444 



i 



Commodore Business and AMIGA User 49 



CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA USER CCI AMIGA I 



Amiga 
Comms 



This would allow a user in the local 
call area of Maidstone, Kent to access 
British Telecom's PRESTEL public 
demonstration frames. The first se- 
quence being the telephone number, 
the second sequence the logon number 
and the final sequence serving as the 

iassword. The time saving this makes is 
considerable and each settings file can ' 
contain up to 10 function key command 
stringy Incidentally, the publication of I 
the telephone number and codes abovey 

re quite regal! 

he secortd^element of these^pa"cjs 
lesMs the file transfer facilityrBy^rfis I 

^othe^jpa^ hjjae-t^Tfeligh .aprRS- 
Tnk. iheHSS^poja^HfTl^AMlQA 
is weTT>tr^irn^f¥tgtflTfmft-Usp i Mar[ U£ 



and supportstrahsmission rates of up to 
19,200 baud. A baud represents one bit 
per second and in general terms a 
screen character is made up of eight 
bits. Thus 19,200 baud equates to 2,400 
characters per second or just over one 
full screen of 80 columns by 25 lines 
(2000 characters). 

The direct transfer of files is very 
important to users who have large 
volumes of data on another disk format 
running under different software. This is 
a topic on which I feel well qualified to 
speak since I recently transferred all of 
my wordprocessing files to the AMIGA 
using one of these packages. All of 
these files were under SUPERSCRIPT 
128, 1571 disk format — some of them 
extending back to EASYSCRIPT in my 
C64 days. They were transmitted from 
my C128D running SUPERSCRIPT using 
a Brainboxes RS-232 interface through 
to the AMIGA running AMIGATERM. 
The transfers were not fast nor were 
they slow. I was limited to a baud rate of 
1200 since the technique I used was to 
have SUPERSCRIPT configured for an 
RS-232 printer. Using the SUPER- 
SCRIPT print command the file was 
then sent ostensibly to the 'printer' 
which was a previously opened buffer 
on the AMIGA. As far as the C1 28D was 
concerned it was talking to a RS-232 
printer. Easy and simple really, the only 
1 ■ 

50 Commodore Business and AMIGA User 



cont 



drawbacks being as I mentioned early, 
SUPERSCRIPT will only support a baud 
rate of 1 200. 

indeed, the C128D will only go to a 
maximum of 2400 baud because RS-232 
is merely emulated by the operating sys- 
tem. The obyiou? answer's to use my 

^ntainsa 

ration is 

k/4this 

j*1 9,200 

being the 



6 
!ri 

wi 
TaRhcWjh ^he 

iack/(of a 
rainboxe 1 
DltageWth 

levels ov& v 

direotcpntfedt 

of^me^Q 
33S5fttnesas 

will have 



t PLlil 
i.e. th 



on 
uitat> 

-R 

3 I 

ito 



>H 



level conven 



-a— r3 



>as 

Is/4 



hey 

robl|er 

ion 



ibk 

!S-2tS2 interface 

ne\ to raise the 

ferP&rtfrorVrn. 

/ores necessaro for 

totheAMIGft. Owo) 

fodjore 70S or\B-s( 

reknowriinttae 

; at all vyith W^r 

tain a 6551 A3IA and more important!' 
have a dedicated RS-232 port with the 
correct voltage lovels. This would also 
apply to othe - ma (es of computers such 
as IBM and A PPUE. One of the software 
developmen environments for the 
AMIGA is this tru sty IBM-PC and regis- 
tered software cevelopers in the UK 
have ben issued with the LATTICE C 
8086 to 680C0 cr:>ss-compiler running 
under PC-DCj)S. Efy now, I hope that you 
can see that 
going for it beyond that of simply look- 
ing at databases and bulletin boards. 
Given either )f th' ;se three packages the 
AMIGA is urlikel/to represent a stum- 
bling block t|) attaining your goal in this 
direction. 



BBS-PC 

This takeshe n cely into the final piece 
of software called BBS-PC which is a 
bulletin boa d package. Bulletin boards 
are similar irscajacept to amateur radio. 
Someone decides to start broadcasting 
local news or information and anyone 
can listen in. Obviously both parties re- 
quire the necessary equipment to do this 
— in radio terms a transmitter and a re- 
ceiver. Transferring this concept to per- 



sonal computers, the equipment neces- 
sary apart from a computer at either end 
of the chain is the software and tele- 
phonic link. A modem is a device which 
allows a casting locomputer to com- 
municate using a telephone line. Gener- 
ally the link is made over public tele- 
phone lines (PSTN) although private 
networks may be used for security 
reasons. 

Public bulletin boards vary from the 
mundane and trivial to amusing and 
informative. By and large, they are very 
computer orientated and run by enthu- 
siasts — those which are run as com- 
mercial entities also tend to be biased 
toward computers/electronics. BBS-PC 
allows you to create your own bulletin 
board. I must admit that up until review- 
ing this package my experience had 
been entirely that of a user of bulletin 
boards. It was therefore something of a 
surprise to realise just how much is 
involved behind the scenes. The setting 
up of the various files necessary to 
support a bulletin board is taken care 
of by the package. I found that the major 
problem was one of creation and selec- 
tion of actually what to put up on dis- 
play. It would be advisable to plan very 
carefully the style and layout of your 
board before anything else. One facet 
oJ-eeS-PC I found invaluable in this 
pu rsjjit of content and style was the abil- 
rix H e &ffiP3 board through the 'back 
i xnbnp . mrnvjm i what the users them- 
actuallysee on the bulletin 



\MIGA to 
)thepre- 




hov\ 



ns. Tl 
good and co 



extensively in the cojrss of abou 
igi is. A black mark f( ir h aving no ir <jlex 



ever, when chap 



er. 



such as 



nn- 



ciplos of operating a UBo'oran appen 
c ix c ontaining detils c f in :erfacing a var- 
i ;ty of different mal;es of modem is 
included, the authori-can be forgiven, 
""he manual itself is a mine of informa- 
lion obviously culled from many years 
of p-actical experience of USA bulletin 
I >oa d practices. 

| I lave no qualms in recommending 
this package even if it has been trans- 
lated for the AMIGA from the realm of 
MS- DOS machines. It is robust and has 
been well and truly put through the mill. 
On reflection it would probably be an 
astute move to purchase BBS-PC rather 
than the other packages. This would 
then alllow you to move into bulletin 
boards at some future date whilst fulfil- 
ling the terminal function albeit with 
fewer facilities then TELECRAFT, 
ONLINE! or AMIGATERM. Alternatively] 
if you are a real comms nut then only 
one of these three need suffice. Once 
more a demonstration in knowledgea- 
ble hands would be called for.